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At Witt's End
#1
That about sums up how aggravated I am trying to get to the bottom of Thunder's penchant for stumbling. Guess it's time to get the vet out for an assessment and ex-rays, as everything else (Natural Balance shoes, chiropractic adjustment, etc.) Just today, he stumbled on his right front three times walking quickly/trotting in the pasture.

So, it looks like there is a possibility that a) I won't be riding next weekend, and b) I will most likely be looking for a new horse next season.......... [Sad]
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#2
Some horses are just clumsey, and it doesn't necessarily mean anything is wrong. A lot of the Quarter Horses I've had, just wouldn't pick up their feet, and would stumble over every little uneven spot on the ground! Unusual to see this in an Arab, though, I admit. Hope everything checks out okay, since he seems to be such a great horse for you, otherwise.

EZ2SPOT
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#3
Thanks, EZ. Clumsy is what I would think, too, if it happened with different feet, but this is always on the right front.

When the chiro was here and observed Thunder at a walk, he said that he was compensating for the movement of his left side, which was the side out of kilter, with his right side. I don't know if all of this compensation for that may be causing problems on the right side now.

He may have a bit or arthritis or something as well, since he is 20 years old.

All I know is it is aggravating to know he may not be trustworthy on trails, because it really detracts from your ride when you are always worried your horse is going to stumble and fall.
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#4
Have you tried him on Bute? I was just wondering if he stumbles as much when he's on it. I have Joe on Platinum Performance for joints since his bout with laminitis per Dr. Bill's suggestion.

Does he stumble more on a particular lead? (not that I'd know what that means!) Do you think he's getting worse?
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#5
Haven't tried him on bute yet, PG. That is one thing my vet said to try when I mentioned to him earlier about Thunder stumbling. Was going to try it at this next weekend's ride. I am sure a supplement would be a good thing for Thunder, as I am sure his joints would appreciate it.

The vet comes tomorrow at 4:00 and I'm hoping he'll have some good news.

When he stumbles, it is always on the right. He will go down to his knees or his hind leg will slide out from under him. When Maria and I rode in Brown County earlier this year, he went down in the front and the back, each time on the right. I don't know if it is getting worse or I am always looking for it. When he canters he is fine. When he is in a fast trot he is fine. But if he walks or does a little job trot he stumbles.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#6
You know he won't stumble when the vet is there!

Let us know what the vet says.
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#7
That is certainly odd! You'd think that if he had a serious problem, it would also be evident at a trot and a canter. Brings to mind the older grade Arab gelding I had, who fell down with me a few times. The vet could find nothing wrong, and finally told me that if he did it again, I was to get off, get him up, get back on, and continue the ride as if nothing had happened. Well, he went down again, I followed the vet's instructions, away we went, and I never had that problem with him again.

EZ2SPOT
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#8
Well, the vet came out, and I think PG must have called Thunder to tip him off! That durn horse didn't stumble a single time!

He did give him a complete going over testing for flexibility, swelling, tenderness in the feet, neurologic weaknesses......you name it. Thunder did fine. No stumble, no bobble, nothing, nada. Vet wanted to see him at a trot and maintained his composure quite well as he watched me TRY to run fast enough to get Thunder to trot. So, we decided to lunge him a little. Thunder moved on the lunge easily, both directions. No bobble, no stumble, nada.

Vet recommended that we try to get a little weight off of him (yes, I let him beef up on me over the summer because we didn't ride much). He gave me some thyroid supplement just to help with the weight loss. He also said to ride him for exercise as well. I am to touch base with the vet every now and then to let him know how the stumbling goes.

He said that if the stumbling continues at its present rate or worsens, he can then test for EPM and navicular, but he didn't think that would be necessary now as he did not see anything on clinical to indicate either.

He also said that if starts to get sore from the exercise, there are some injections I can give him for his joints.

So, after the vet left. I decided to lunge Thunder for about 10 minutes. Can ya guess what happened? Yep, he started stumbling!

We shall see what the next few weeks hold.
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#9
EPM was the first thing that came to mind for me, but in my experience the stumbling never improved but just got worse. So in my honest opinion, I really don't think Thunder has EPM from what I went through with two of my horses that died from it. Of course any vet would know more about that than I do.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#10
My husband's horse stumbles and does not want
to pick her feet up.Some times i think it is
being Lazy'. I want to know what the vet. would say.
I have been giving all the horses a joint suplment.
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