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ground work ideas?
#11
Amberly,

I read your profile and you say you are 12. If so, perhaps that is why you think you know more than anyone else. RH is older than dirt and invented the saddle and rode the very first horse so she probably does know what she's talking about!

If you've done those techniques with your horse, then you have a very patient tolerant forgiving horse. I know it's is hard to accept, but there are others that probably know a bit more about training and horses than you do. I urge you to be cautious when doing any of the things you've described as doing with your horse and I hope there is a horse savvy adult nearby to help you.

And, btw, if my horse steps on my foot, I'm not shoving him with my thumb. He'll get a slap on whatever part of his body I can get to.

I encourage you to read though the training posts here on DE.

Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#12
"the horse has learned to go into a small enclosure on cue"
Exactly. Some horses may spook when they go through small spaces. They aren't squeezing, it's just a name for the exercise.

"You can't assume someone will automatically know what you mean."
I didn't, I was going to make another post on some exercises and games - including this one. And, sorry about that!

"Flexing puts the horse in position to move. A horse can't move before that. And once flexed to the best advantage, there is no need to poke or prod anything. You are talking about a 1000 lb. animal. You think you're going to move him if he doesn't want to by poking him?"
But what if you don't have a halter with you, it would be harder to flex the horse - if by flexing you mean bending of the head. I do not poke or prod. I have already stated that. I apply pressure slowly and steadily. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_tF3ndnN9k In this video, she uses all of her fingers to apply pressure - which is also another way instead of just your thumb. What you are not getting is I am not prodding the horse - I am slowly and steadily applying pressure until the horse moves away. No flexing or anything is necessary and it is another quick and effective way.

"And YOU are the one who needs help. I gave riding lessons for 8 years. I showed horses for over 30 years. I have trained regional and national champions and have the trophies and national points to prove it. I know from where I speak."
It does not matter how many years you have done anything or been teaching anything. There are different methods too. I'm not saying you are this way, but some people have trained, showed, and taught for many many years - but are still not very good at it. It's impossible to know everything or to always be right.

Paintgal:
"I read your profile and you say you are 12. If so, perhaps that is why you think you know more than anyone else."
I am not sure why it says I am twelve, I am almost 15. That is very weird. And no matter what age I am, I DO NOT think I am better or I know more than anyone else, because I don't. I don't know more than anyone, but I do know what I believe and what is right. I am not saying you are wrong, I am only saying that e all have different methods and we need to accept that. I am only trying to help you understand me, not proving you wrong or anything.

To be able to ride, you must know how to fall.
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#13
Like Paint Gal said; You must have very tolerant horses. Not all horses will act the way yours do. And please, get supervision from an experienced trainer or riding instructor.

I already figured you were a teenager from how you write your posts. It came through clearly. We were all that age at one time, and I too thought I knew a lot about horses at that age. Then I ran into people who took the time and the patience to show me I knew diddily squat. Once I realized that and accepted I had tons to learn, everything went so much more smoothly. I came to understand horses and horse behavior in a brand new way that reaped huge rewards in the long run. You will too, and I urge you to seek out mentors like I was so fortunate to have and were willing to teach me.

I see what you've written thinking you can help others and see the dangers stick out like neon signs. You have barely scraped the surface of knowing how to work around horses. You need to learn more before posting any kind of advice here or anywhere else. You need to ask questions, ask for advice, and accept it graciously. I don't like talking down to you, but you are headed for a serious wreck with the things you've suggested. Heed the warning of those more knowledgeable than you. Think safety first and foremost when working around any horse, yours or someone else's. We want to keep you from ending up seriously injured or worse.

Yes there are different methods to train horses. I've seen what some methods can do to those who lack the ability to use them or misinterpret them. And some methods just plain don't work or are unsafe. I see this in what you offer as advice. It's the job of us more experienced horse people on this forum to keep you safe and anyone who reads what's posted here safe. That's why it's so vital to make sure what you post is safe and won't be misinturpreted by someone else. That's all. Your journey in the world of horses has just started. You've barely left the trail head with the entire ride still ahead of you, and we're here to guide you on a wonderful ride that will stay with you forever... if you'll just give us a chance.

BTW: I'd like to see your regional champion and national champion trophies. I'll gladly show you mine, and I've earned every single one of them. And I'll leave it at that.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#14
I know how to work around horses. And I don't need trophies or anything else. I don't need nor want to show off my skills. I'd rather keep them private. But people like you always want to be right and always want to prove others wrong.

I use Parelli and Buck Brannaman. All of those techniques I have shared come from those people.

I'm done trying to help you understand what I'm saying. It's not worth my time.
To be able to ride, you must know how to fall.
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#15
No I don't. My show days are behind me. I quit when things changed and in the wrong direction to how horses should move and behave. Nowadays I enjoy horse camping and trail riding with my friends. I brought up horse showing to prove I know from where I speak. I've learned from others much more talented than I and wish you the same. You were the one to come at me and challenge where I am coming from. All I did was defend my position.

Just explain yourself much more clearly so nothing you say can be taken the wrong way or used by someone else because you assume they will automatically understand. Too much chance of someone doing it wrong and ending up in a terrible wreck.

It's not just me understanding you. It's also you understanding me.
You're the one not listening. Listen, ask, learn, from us here on this forum. That's all I ask. Regardless of whatever clinician you follow, we can help you as an individual. Help that's one on one. You can't get that through a clinician in a magazine article, a book, or online. You are the newcomer here. All we're trying to do is steer you in the right direction. Let us help even if it's only by pointing out your mistakes if you're not going to ask for advice. It's a lonely road you're undertaking. Let us travel it with you.

And like I said; I'll continue to point out any time you post something that you need guidance on or might put someone else in a bad situation. Just make your posts much much clearer and to the point. If done right, you won't hear a peep out of me. If not, I'll have my say.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#16
I use radial side reins, they do a great job with all head issues.

Link removed. Please review the forum rules. Also, it might be nice to post an intro and tell us a little about your horse experience.
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#17
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

Amberly,
RH is older than dirt and invented the saddle and rode the very first horse so she probably does know what she's talking about!



LOL!

I learned early in my DE Forum career DO NOT disparage lunging!


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#18
When I was fifteen I knew everything there was to know about horses. Then I forgot most of it for a few years. But at around 23, I was assigned to ride an ex racehorse on trails - after a few lumps and bumps, I knew everything again, only better and with scars to remind me of how much I "knew".

It wasn't for another 35 years that I learned the one thing that has really helped:

I KNEW NOTHING AT ALL

Now, thanks to another 14 years of intense focus on horse psychology and training, lots of help from some of the best trainers in the world, and a willingness to pick up bits from anyone (even a 15 year old), I have amassed a tremendous body of knowledge and one deep realization;

I STILL KNOW NOTHING

... except horse. I can get horses to do things - willingly, easily and usually enthusiastically.

Amberly, there are no magic techniques. What works today with this horse may not work tomorrow, or with another horse. All you can hope for is that as you get better, you will spend less and less time doing things that don't work, and more and more time doing things that produce positive changes, no matter how small.

Take it from one who has spent a lot of time doing things that didn't work. [Wink]
"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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#19
Excellent, AD. You have nailed it exactly. Every new horse you meet will tell you that you don't know what you thought you did about their kind. They are the true teachers along with those rare but incredible humans that have been there ahead of us still waiting in the wings.

Well said, my friend. Well said indeed.
"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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#20
Where is the like button for AD? Great post and so very true.
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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