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Simple Safety Tips
#1
I just wrapped all my flat-back buckets with duct tape to prevent an injury and thought it might be nice for everyone to share simple safety tips especially for new horse owners/riders. We all know horses find all kinds of ways to get into trouble. We have a horse with a scar on her nose from when she was a baby. She was eating out of a bucket and the handle pierced her nose where it is bent back around. It required many stitches to fix. All I did was wrap duct tape around the wire where the handle attaches to the bucket and the wire is no danger to the horse. Anyone else got any tips?

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#2
Keep your pastures clear of junk and/or machinery. Keep fences in good repair and the lid tight on your grain bin. Keep the halter off except when working with your horse.
Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
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#3
quote:
Originally posted by Parrothead

Keep your pastures clear of junk and/or machinery. Keep fences in good repair and the lid tight on your grain bin. Keep the halter off except when working with your horse.



Sounds so simple! I've seen horses lost over all of those. It amazes me when I see a horse turned out with its halter on, for days on end. There's one running next to our property right now - the rancher who owns that property is way old, but he's also a veterinarian for cryin' out loud! Should know better. If he's still there in a day or so, I'm taking his halter off.
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#4
One I need to remember to do more consistently: put on shipping boots for trailer rides, especially with multiple horses. In the confined space of a trailer, it's too easy for a horse to give itself a bloody ding on the lower leg from either shifting around or trying to kick.

'plash
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#5
On trailering- I also put fly masks on my horses when hauling in our stock trailer. If a rock or dust comes between the slats the fly masks will help protect the eyes.
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#6
Good one TC. My trailer has those open side slats and I never even thought about that. Doh!

Thanks!
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#7
Close gates & latch everytime you go through them even if you will be right back and will latch them on the way out. Don't ask me how I know this.
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
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#8
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

Close gates & latch everytime you go through them even if you will be right back and will latch them on the way out. Don't ask me how I know this.



This is so true! One time not so long ago my sister had her horse in the arena and I brought Frosty in to the far side. I had asked my sister if she could close the gate, which I thought she heard. I unlatched Frosty and started to walk back towards the gate and noticed it was open. [:O] My sister apparently didn't hear me ask her to close it. Immediately I heard honking galloping and turned to see the swish of white blur past me as Frosty made a bee line for the gate. Out the gate she went right to the pasture fence and stood there as if nothing was going on. Yoiks! [|)]
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#9
If your horse acts up while being bridled, check it's mouth, ears, etc. I have seen so many people just think their horse is just being stubborn.

Check high traffic areas for nails/glass. Find a thrown shoe as soon as possible. Keep your horse's water clean. If you have to saddle your horse before trailering, do NOT put his bridle on as well. Tie your horses high when you tie them so they can't paw and get their foot over the rope.
Four things greater than all things are, -
Women and Horses and Power and War.
~Rudyard Kipling, "The Ballad of the King's Jest"
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#10
quote:
Originally posted by tchighhope

When ever I buy new buckets, before I use them I make sure the "eyes" on the bail and the "S" hooks are fully closed, Then I use a MIG welder to close them permanently, taking care not to leave any rough spots. I think adding tape is giving a horse something else to chew on. If you don't have a welder, ask around, people who have horses have a "once in awhile"need for one.


Larry Van Dorn
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