Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Possible Purchase
#11
Agree with ILJ, PG and Harv. Nice looking guy, but it really is what's in his head that counts. I'd do what ILJ suggests - see how quickly he gets over stuff. No matter how much has been put into him, there's likely to be some things that set him off. Consider "what does he do when he's scared of something?". Does he try to run off, or crow-hop, or just start and freeze? How may reps before the reaction goes away? If he desensitizes quickly, it shouldn't be hard to get him where you need him to be. If he's still freaked out by the same thing the umpteenth time you show it to him, maybe another horse would be better/easier for you.
Reply
#12
PaintGal, ILG and ArenaDirt - Thanks so much for your input and it makes a lot of sense. I did work with this guy putting on the saddle blanket without him tied (like the owner always did) and he did calm down quickly and allow the blanket without moving away, but remained nervous. I tried to longe him (very gently) but he was very fearful. Flipping the lead rope over him was also very scary and he is head shy. He is also a hard catch with the owner saying he has to "chase him for a long time", but when I used advance/retreat I was able to catch him in about 10 minutes in a 1 acre pasture. He is a sweet horse and only tried to get away, never pushed into me. I know he will make someone a wonderful horse, but he isn't what I'm looking for, a horse that is safe now so I can rebuild my riding skills and work with my other two, one green and one not ridden yet. With 3 falls in 3 years I don't want to push my luck at my age with osteoporosis.

I did find a nice mare that I'm having the vet check Monday. She is very calm and has a great attitude, comes right up to you in a 5 acre pasture and puts her nose in the halter. She loves to go on trail rides and has done very well with barrels & poles. She is an 8 year old Morgan Quarterhorse and has won in Halter, pole bending & Western Pleasure. She is so happy to go places that to load her all you have to do is toss the leadrope over her neck and say "trailer" and she loads herself. I did have one little concern as when doing figure eights when the owner asked her for a flying lead change she did a slight crow hop, but this was the only time she would do it. It was as if she was confused and didn't know what to do. However when doing the pole bending pattern that she knows, she does it flawlessly without any crow hops. I will probably have a trainer work on this one thing as I'm not sure why she is doing it. Otherwise she is the perfect horse and I don't think I could find this many good qualities in one horse if I were to keep searching. I'll try to post a photo of her.

Thanks again to everyone for your help!
Linda
Reply
#13
Here is a photo of the mare I think I'm purchasing. Confirmation wise I think she looks great but she doesn't have the wide Quarterhorse chest which you can't see in the photo. I don't know if that is the Morgan in her or her age of 8.

[Image: gallery1]
Linda
Reply
#14
She sure sounds & looks like a nice mare! I hope she works out.

Keep us posted!
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
Reply
#15
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

She sure sounds & looks like a nice mare! I hope she works out.

Keep us posted!



I agree, and she has a kind eye! (I am a sucker for a sweet face!)
[Big Grin]



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
Reply
#16
Thank you for all the well wishes and compliments on "Star". She passed her vet check with flying colors, no lameness, no navicular, back, lungs, heart good, conformation good. I asked him about the narrow chest and he thought her chest was perfect for a Morgan/Quarter. Guess I'm used to my big Mustang who's built like a tank.

The weather is finally letting me take my first ride on Star this evening. I'll let you know how it goes. So far, I adore this horse!
Linda
Reply
#17

I'm glad that Star is working out so far! Let us know how the ride goes! [clap]



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
Reply
#18
Congratulations. Of course we will need some more pictures. She looks real photogenic in the showmanship photo.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Reply
#19
Well, the first ride was a dissappointment. I had stressed to the sellers that I was looking for a safe, well trained horse as with my age and osteoporosis, back problems, etc. I could not afford any more falls or fractures. On our first ride she walked the length of the pasture next door where two of her new horse buddies are, then refused to go any further. (I admit I was nervous, which I'm sure she picked up on). On insisting she keep going she started crow hopping. Unfortunately I had the bit that this horse has been using, a Tom Thumb snaffle with shanks, so I didn't dare try to one-rein her and couldn't handle it the way I wanted. I did my best to make her work just by neck reining, circles, backing, to make it more pleasant for her to just go the direction I wanted her to go but nothing worked. I waited for my ridding buddy to meet me and was then able to get her to walk along with the other horse. It was getting dark and she became spooky, afraid to step off a curb, etc. I had so little control over her I got off and walked her home. Of course the previous owners said she had never done this before. The next day I did some ground work and lateral flexion which she quickly remembered and was cooperative. I put her in a D-ring snaffle and we tried again. She was much calmer, but balked at the same spot. This time with the snaffle I was able to one-rein her, make her work and then she would go a few steps further where we would have to repeat the process. I didn't have a switch. No crow hopping this time as I had better control and could flex her. Eventually we met the other horse and rider and from that point on we rode streets and trails and she was absolutely perfect, calm, energetic and loved the ride. She was so much more comfortable in a snaffle and responded usually with a light touch. I could tell her bare feet were sensitive on rocks but she kept doing every thing I asked with a great attitude. She was very sure footed, non spooky to things most domestic horses would spook at, and a pleasure to ride after we got going.

In talking to the girl who mostly rode her before, the only time she crow hopped with her was when she asked for a lead change (using Tom Thumb). However, she does perfect flying lead changes in pole bending. I'm wondering if the Tom Thumb was the culprit mixed with some barn sourness she needs to get over, in addition to sensitive feet.

I'm going to have her shod ASAP and keep taking her out. I think she will work out with a little work. I'm also looking into the proper bit for her as I'm never using that Tom Thumb again, and I don't thinks she needs a training bit. She is collected, did barrels, poles and started reining training. She is 8 years old.

Thanks for your good wishes. As always, I really appreciate your comments.

Linda
Linda
Reply
#20

She sounds like she will work out with a little time to settle in and adjust. When I first started taking Monte out alone he was nervous and so was I, which he zeroed in on. I used an old cowboy trick I was told about by an old cowboy in fact. I would take along a bag of goodies and when we came to a real spooky place, we would stop and have a "picnic". Pretty soon he couldn't wait to get to the spooky place. Sometimes I would get off and just walk him for a while, then get back on and ride. It all helped to relax me and him both, and it worked too. Hope to hear more success stories about your new girl.[Smile]
A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)