Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Keeper for now
#1
Hi all, I've been reading but not posting lately.

It difficult to find western lessons in my area, English is the name of the game here. Until I find a someone who can help me learn I'm just going to be content to be a keeper and not a rider. I'm very comfortable with my horses in the our small pasture. Outside - I'm just too frightened & feel that I don't have enough tools to make good choices to keep us both safe. Coming to this decision has been a huge relief. My husband will continue to ride on and maybe some time in the future I will too.
Reply
#2
Hi Bethany, I've missed your posts.

Keep in mind that you don't have to ride western to trail ride. Plenty of English-style riders do it too, it's not all stadium jumpers and dressage jackets out there. Keep up the hunt for a good lesson trainer, have fun & enjoy what you're doing, and don't worry too much about English or Western.

'plash
Reply
#3

Are you wanting to show? If not, then like plash says it's not all about jumping and looking fancy. Good riding is all the same basically. I always rode western style as a kid, when I decided to take a few lessons, english was the only thing available to me so I went for it. I've never regretted it. Make it clear to the trainer that you just want to learn to ride good and safely , period.
A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

Reply
#4
I couldn't agree more that it really doesn't matter whether your lessons are English or Western. I took lessons last spring and summer from an eventer/dressage rider, and it helped me a great deal, even though I ride Western at home and on the trails.

So please keep an open mind when looking for a riding instructor.

EZ2SPOT
Reply
#5
Everyone is right on....building rider confidence and balance is the same in all disciplines. Soft hands and a good seat is the same too.
I think what will help you the most, is to get those hours in the saddle....and what a great place to be! [Big Grin]



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
Reply
#6
Bethany,

You've got to do what you feel you are able to but taking English lessons is going to help a lot and you'll transfer what you've learned easily to a western saddle. If you really want to get on a horse then talk to the English instructors and tell them what your goals are. You might consider a few private lessons first and then join a group. You will learn a lot from each and I think it's important to learn to ride with others.

If you're happy watching and caring for horses from the ground then that's fine too! There's is a lot of satisfaction to be had from just grooming, feeding, hugging & watching horses. [Wink]
Karen ~ Trails  
  &
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."
[Image: th_horse-galloping.gif]  

~~~~~~
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)