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Another Plug for Helmets
#1
Natasha Richardson died from her head injury and she was skiing on a bunny slope when her accident happened. You can read more about her and the accident [url="http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090319/ap_on_en_mo/obit_natasha_richardson"]here[/url].

Her fall was from head high from the ground. NOT head high on a horse.

Those of you not wearing helmets....please, please reconsider.
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#2
How sad.

I remember in High School a young boy that rode our bus, had an accident on his bike, where he ran into a parked car and got sick the same way that evening and died.

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#3
Mont Tremblant is not far from here. It did say this on that link about helmets:

The fact that Richardson was not wearing a helmet may or may not have made a difference in the gravity of her injury. If skiers are moving slowly - say 10 m.p.h. or slower - and they fall on soft snow, they're probably not going to be hurt severely, whether they're wearing a helmet or not. If they're moving faster than 15 or 20 m.p.h. and strike ice, hard-packed snow or another solid object with the head, they're likely to suffer severe injury, and again the presence of a helmet may not make much difference. It's in the middle area - at speeds that are neither very slow nor very fast - that a helmet can play the biggest role. The trick, of course, is that you never know when you're going to be in that gray zone, since even slow beginner skiers can lose control and speed up, and high-speed skiers have to slow down eventually.


Physics makes things trickier still, causing different parts of the body to move at different speeds. Your skis or snowboard may be sliding along at a slow 10 m.p.h., but if you catch a tip or edge on something stationary, the rest of you plunges forward and accelerates. "The body acts as an inverted pendulum, so the upper body moves much faster than the lower body," says Shealy.


Once you do fall and hit, the brain can do much more than just bump the inside of the skull. "You can have stretching of cortical connections or stretching of blood vessels, and that can lead to bleeding," Shealy says. "You can also have linear or rotational acceleration [of the brain]. There's a lot that can go wrong in there."


Even some experts acknowledge that helmets are no panacea, and not only because they become less effective at higher speeds. Skiers argue that they reduce peripheral vision and also provide a false sense of security that encourages speeding. Those claims may well have some truth, but seat belts too may create a false sense of security, yet few people argue the wisdom of wearing them. Helmets may not provide the same level of protection as a seat belt, but in some cases, even inconsistent protection may make all the difference.


View this article on Time.com

I would still go for a helmet, we have a customer that was riding his bike to work and got hit by a car running a red light, he was hit head on, his helmet was broken right down the middle, it saved his life, he wrote a letter to the helmet manufacturer to congratulate them and for saving his life too.

Colleen who hopes to have a horse soon.

The air of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears -- Arabian proverb

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#4
Whether a helmet could have prevented the brain injury in the skiing accident, we'll never know, but I've never heard of a helmet CAUSING an injury to the head.

I grew up thinking that I was "too good" a rider to need one, but now that I know better, I won't ride without a helmet. It just takes but an instant and there's no "do overs".

Very sad indeed....



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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#5
On a related note, while horse shopping I took my helmet each time. After discussing it with Mr1Walks, I decided I'd wear it even when testing out horses. Remember I'm buying an easy gaited horse in Kentucky, you can imagine some of the sellers. [:o)] Well, we went to look at a horse. The owner rode it up and down the barn aisle, bareback with a halter. Nice. Then he saddled/bridled him and rode him again. Nice. Then I got on him (helmeted) and he was nice until I said "I'm going to ride him outside". Outside he was like this --> [:O][}Smile][xx(][B)]. Yeah. Proceeded to act like a big fool even when the guy rode him. I was so glad that I would have had my helmet if something happened. Um, we didn't buy him.

*Riding smoothly with Spotted Saddle Horses "Thunder" and "Sugar"*
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#6
I'm gonna ramble.
Folks I think everybody is on the same page with the helmets. What we need to bring out is our awareness of how easily this can happen.
Our forum friend Rick just lost his SIL to this same type of accident. She was in a car wreck and went to the hospital and sent home thinking everything was ok. Same outcome.[Sad]
What we do need to remember is that if this happens and conditions change imeadiate medical help is needed. It appears Colleen has a good point.
quote:
Once you do fall and hit, the brain can do much more than just bump the inside of the skull. "You can have stretching of cortical connections or stretching of blood vessels, and that can lead to bleeding," Shealy says. "You can also have linear or rotational acceleration [of the brain]. There's a lot that can go wrong in there."


I think this would be like a double severe case of whip lash.


Maybe Bones will help us understand and we all can learn from this.




<edited by Hook to correct quote symbol to fix page width display>
Keeping The Kids In a Saddle and Out of Trouble
Giddyup
"Holy Moly I'll Buy What They're Selling" LJD (Get A Little Mud On The Tires)


[url="http://spreadsheets.google.com/pub?key=pAL83zDwQmy92yrTMg4xpPg"]Morgan's riding log[/url]
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#7
www.braininjury.com/injured.html



I'm not a trauma nurse; sounds like she did not seek definitive treatment (ED, CT scan) in time; not sure of the time line but sounds like the bleed progressed rapidly. Clots, edema, all can impair nerve function and blood flow = cell/tissue/brain death. Little I heard, I am guessing she was brain dead when they flew back to the states.

How sad. ANY head trauma and especially with headache, dizziness,not feeling well, vomiting etc....get in PRONTO.

Had a friend who got concussion from walking into a low lying branch from coconut tree...I mean, how hard can you hit when just walking????Took her about a week before she started feeling normal.


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#8
Actually, this is what killed my Mom a couple of years ago. She tripped over a chair (in her doctor's office, no less!) and hit her head hard when she fell. Even though they were literally next door to a hospital, by the time her headache was bad enough to worry anyone, it was too late because of the blood-thinning drugs she was on. Head impacts are definitely NOT to be taken lightly, and should always be checked out just in case...

'plash
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#9
quote:
Originally posted by 1Walks1Trots

On a related note, while horse shopping I took my helmet each time. After discussing it with Mr1Walks, I decided I'd wear it even when testing out horses. Remember I'm buying an easy gaited horse in Kentucky, you can imagine some of the sellers. [:o)] Well, we went to look at a horse. The owner rode it up and down the barn aisle, bareback with a halter. Nice. Then he saddled/bridled him and rode him again. Nice. Then I got on him (helmeted) and he was nice until I said "I'm going to ride him outside". Outside he was like this --> [:O][}Smile][xx(][B)]. Yeah. Proceeded to act like a big fool even when the guy rode him. I was so glad that I would have had my helmet if something happened. Um, we didn't buy him.




Good for you. Especially important when riding a strange horse.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#10
quote:
Originally posted by Colleen
[br
Even some experts acknowledge that helmets are no panacea, and not only because they become less effective at higher speeds. Skiers argue that they reduce peripheral vision and also provide a false sense of security that encourages speeding. Those claims may well have some truth, but seat belts too may create a false sense of security, yet few people argue the wisdom of wearing them. Helmets may not provide the same level of protection as a seat belt, but in some cases, even inconsistent protection may make all the difference.




I have never worn a ski helmet but I suspect a helmet certified for Horse Back riding is different as is a bike helmet and a motor cycle helmet. I know I would not be writing this now if I was not wearing a Motorcycle Helmet back in 1969 when I flipped my motorcycle and bashed my head on the pavement.

I heard the same vision restriction argument from an old time cowboy who also said the extra weight would cause neck problems.

I wear my Helmet every time I ride. Shucks, I buy Lottery tickets to win the big one where the odds of winning are far lower than the odds of falling from a horse and getting serious head injury without a helmet.[Big Grin]
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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