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First Lesson
#1
I road Brewster a 20 yr old Qtr horse yesterday during my first lesson. We did a lot of jogging (bone jarring/Brewster's not real smooth), instruction on how to sit, where to keep my shoulders, how to keep my feet, how to instruct the horse with voice, legs and tail of reins (I reined with one hand). It was a good start. I felt comfortable with the instructor and I'm headed back next Saturday. [Wink]
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#2
Excellent! Those bone jarring trots are a pain, to be sure, but think of it as good motivation to learn how to sit in a way that helps smooth them out! Keep up the good work!

'plash
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#3
I was nervous about a canter ... no more ... this jogging has me sore! What motovation!!!
Beth
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#4
Good work! I had an instructer that told me if I wasn't sore at the end of a lesson then she wasn't working me hard enough - and boy she worked us!!! That means both you and the instructor did well. [Big Grin]

Really, a trot is much harder to sit than a nice collected canter. Once you get that trot down you will find the canter a piece of cake. Keep us posted on your progress.

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#5
As usual, Mrs Hook is right on the money. The trot is far and away the most difficult gait to sit well.

Mrs H, I think I had that instructor once... was she the one who made you trot for fifteen minutes at a stretch while posting with no stirrups? (Talk about sore!)
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#6
Sounds like your first "torture" session went well[Big Grin]. You'll be cantering along in no time.

Jan
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#7
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Mrs H, I think I had that instructor once... was she the one who made you trot for fifteen minutes at a stretch while posting with no stirrups? (Talk about sore!)



She only made you trot without stirrups for 15 minutes?? She must have been slipping, we got to warm up with stirrups and then we got to post the rest of the lesson without them. If your belly muscles weren't screaming as well as your legs, then again you were told you weren't doing it right.

Did you have the western coach that made you two point the whole lesson - walk trot and canter? That was an interesting experience. Everyone needs to try it, and just see how long you can actually manage to stay up and in control.
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#8
"Did you have the western coach that made you two point the whole lesson - walk trot and canter?"

LOL! Oh yeah... I was threatened with having to do that every day until I no longer complained about being sore the next day. Not that I ever stopped getting sore from it, but I DID stop complaining!

Some things never change - recently Jerry (Lucas) has been getting on me for not keeping my legs in full contact with the horse at all times - no relaxing the legs and letting them hang. Interesting with cutting - it's really critical to keep that contact so you don't have to move at all to deliver a leg cue. No kicking allowed of course (most cutting horses will literally jump away from a leg that loses contact), just varying calf pressure. Heels down of course, but toes point out. Heels WAY down so spurs don't make any contact. It works a whole 'nuther set of leg muscles from the "English" or western pleasure seat where the toes are near parallel to the horse. And no spur jabbing at all, only roll the rowl up the horse's side by dipping the toes if extra emphasis is required. I found all that couterintuitive for a long time, but now it feel pretty natural.
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