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Greenie Mare
#11
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

quote:
Originally posted by Hook

You might want to get a weight tape to keep an eye on her after the move. It's hard sometimes to see any trends when you are with her every day.


Especially this time of year, when they are all furry and it's hard to tell what's under all the fluff.

A word of caution about how she greets you in the stall. The rubbing up against you is sweet and all, but she really needs to respect your space and not rub on you.

She is a very pretty mare!



Picaboo doesn't really get a furry coat in the winter so I'll be able to tell more easily if there is a significant change in her weight. I'll still consider buying weight tape at the tack shop just so I can follow up with things. :]

And about the stall tip, thank you. She DOES respect my space. Very much so. If there were a problem where she wasn't doing that I would address it immediately. I don't like when horses do that. I've had a few that would try to completely ignore you when leading and do anything in their power to get somewhere else, let's say... hay or feed, etc. The ones that take advantage of you... they learned quickly that their behavior would NOT work with me. :] If she moves more near to me than I prefer, I make it known to her and she repects it. [She has never crossed me or got in my way at any time in her stall. She usually just keeps to herself.] She just nickers like that and gets excited. Once I get into the stall she quiets and just wants some love since now, I'm not seeing her as much as we both want to be together. Haha
*Tara*
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#12
quote:
I just didn't want to cover this forum in a bunch of pictures.


HAA ha ha ha ha! [Big Grin] Not cover this forum in pictures??? Now THAT's funny! [Image: laugher.gif] Nah, c'mon, we LIKE pictures.... though your links work pretty well too.

'plash
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#13
Hi!
I think you have a lot of work ahead of you! To get your easy spooked horse calm, I have had my horse for seven years now and he still spooks occationally but not near as much as in the beginning. the big thing is to build your horse selfconfidence and confidence in you as her trusting leader.
here are some great articles to desensitizing horses and practices how to help them overcome the spookiness hope they will help!
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_spooking2.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_spooking.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_ground44.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_ground45.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_ground46.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_ground48.php
http://www.horsechatting.com/b_ground49.php
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#14
Tara:

Picaboo is gorgeous; I love her face. I would definitely reccomend the pre-purchase exam by the vet just to make sure she's 100% sound. If you feel you will be doing a lot of jumping with her, xrays of her legs wouldn't be out of the question.

It sounds to me like she is reacting to her game plan being changed (i.e., going from the leisurly life of full-time broodmare to that of a working horse. If she has recently been relicated to this new lifestyle and/or surroundings that may well have something to do with her being spooky.

Horses are animals that need to develop confidence in themselves and trust in their human counterparts. It sounds like she is quite well behaved for ground handling, but you are having trouble introducing her to new things. Desensitization is the key and working slowlt and patiently as you build her trust in you and whatever you ask of her.

There are many training resource materials at your fingertips via researching the internet and the many fine, reputable and experienced horse people on Daily Equine.
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#15
HI Tara and welcome to DE!
Picabo is gorgeous. You have gotten some good advice, so I won't add much except you might expose her to the velcro "zipping" sound before even trying to apply the boots. She may be alarmed by the sound. I would do it while she is at liberty until she understands that it won't hurt her. If you have a round pen, I would put them on in there and let her get used to them. Wear a helmet when applying them.
Regarding spookiness, when she spooks or is worried about something, do not focus on it. Act like it is not a big deal at all. Look past the spooky thing and ride ahead. If she trusts you, she will take her cues from you. Some horses take awhile. My Rocky took 4 years before he was confident, but now will go anywhere I point him. It took lots of wet saddle blankets to get there.
Nancy (and Tag & Rocky)
Free & easy down the trail I go......
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#16
Yeah, Picaboo has a very "girlish" figure and face. There's some horses you can just TELL are girls or boys, and others, you can't. Picaboo would not make you think twice. :]

We might get xrays of her legs. Either now or later, because I know jumping at this new barn will not be for awhile. She needs her balance before she trys ANYTHING. [Her legs are sooo tiny too.] I don't know if you can see in the pictures, but they're just soo delicate. I just feel like they're going to break when I get on. Haha.

Hmm, I never really thought about her "game plan" being changed. But I think that seems to be VERY logical. This is Peak's story... I feel like she's a modern-day Black Beauty. Haha. She was being kept at the fairgrounds [where people can do self care, everything- feeding/cleaning etc. themselves] and she was just a broodmare. She was leased a couple of times, had a few babies, not turned out at all. With her little training she had, the barn I ride at now bought her for a school horse. Well, they soon found out that even though Peak has exceptional breeding, her as a school horse may not do quite well. She took off with people when she spooked [not very far, but an unbalanced canter on a trembling horse will make people not happy.] She ducked things, she threw people off... I remember one time she was TERRIFIED of a traffic cone. I would go near it and she'd go completely insane. She looks at EVERYTHING when you ride. Ground poles were a biggg no no. A little bit of mud? I think not. School horse? That soon stopped. Now she hardly gets ridden at all. No one wants to work with her. My lost cause. :[ However, she's gotten lots more training... She doesn't spook as much and her "spooks" are far less scary. But, she still ducks jumps. Thank God my mare takes care of me. Even my trainers say that. From the moment I started riding her they said she was completely different for me compared to other people, and they highly encouraged that if I really liked her, she would be a wonderful buying prospect. She would never think about ducking or sending me to the ground. I started out my jumping on her. [Great- a new jumper on a greenie.] I'm fine when I jump, I just lean too far forward and ride with a "duck butt" I guess, which in some cases, just causes me to collapse over the jump and Peak just takes it as it comes. It's pretty amusing. However, I'm getting better and doing that less and less. I've just recently switched to riding a different horse to just re-teach me some things. Peak gets terribly upset with me :[ Anyways, Peak's life of a "school horse" will not even reach that. I fell in love with her as she has for me, and I've realized, I cannot live without her. Hence why, I'M going to be her ONLY mom. She won't have to worry about being over worked and having scary kids ride her. She'll have somebody to trust.

I'm so excited. :]

On Saturday when I go back to the barn, I'll just bring the boots and introduce them again. Not even put them on, just show her and let her be around them. I'll make sure I zip and unzip them until she doesn't care at all. Just last week, I was holding my saddle pad in the aisle and she saw it and jumped back in her stall. I was like, WTF? You've seen this and had this on you plenty of times. So I grabbed her halter, went in there, and showed her that a saddle pad being held by me ISN'T scary. I ran it all over her. I even just let it stay on her neck for a while and she was just confused. I eventually just let her wear it around until she was comfortable and payed no attention to it. Silly girl.

I've done a lot of research on horses via the internet, maybe looking for about 6 years. So I'm pretty knowledgeable. [It's just scary and frustrating when it's your first time at something.] You don't quite exactly what to do. I'm sure I'll be fine.

What happens during a vet check? [I've been to the vet plenty of times with my other animals- rats, ferret, cockatiel, dobermans... I don't know what else we have anymore.]

Does everyone here just ride western?
*Tara*
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#17
Tara:

I have no doubt you will bring Tara out of her shell and watch her bloom into a fantastic horse. Patience is the key, and I believe you are going to have that in spades. It is good you have spent the past years preparing for the ownership of your own horse; you have basically "hit the ground running."

During a pre-purchase vet exam, the vet will most generally evaulate basic things such as heart rate, teeth, temperature, pulse, respiration, legs, feet, gait, etc. I would recommend a somewhat more extensive exam that encompasses jumping, if that is the avocation you most expect from Picaboo. I would also recommend having the vet administer any needed vaccinations and a tetanus shot, if she is not up to date on those. I would also have him do a fecal count to check for any parasitial infestation. A blood panel is not unheard of either, if you wanted to go the extra expense. All of this will basically ensure you are getting a healthy horse.

From your explanation about Pic, it sounds like you and she are already developing a special bond, and let me tell you as someone who has been around horses most of her life, this doesn't happen often. I believe you may well have found your forever horse and Pic her forever home.

Keep us updated on Pic's progress and how she responds to her new environment and training.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#18
Thank you for telling me what happens during a vet exam. I just want to be prepared for any things that may come my way. [I'm mostly going to be doing lots of groundwork with her.] We're going to jump a little bit, but not anything very big. No big oxers, low verticals... Peak is probably so confused on what she's supposed to do. First, she was ridden western, then I guess she was trained in some dressage, now, she's encouraged to be a jumper. Poor pony. :[ She's very very intelligent though. In the summer I also want her to be a trail pony... Oh man, THAT will be fun to teach her. Moving leaves and trees... she'll have a heart attack.

Picabo already got all her shots in the fall. She was given them at the same time the other horses at the barn received them. However, I have to get a list of everything they've received.

Also, another thing I need for Peak is a coggins and strangles test [something needed in order for her to stay at the new barn.] What happens when they test for that? And when are test results given back?
*Tara*
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#19
Tara:

The Coggins test is just a blood test to guarantee Pic is negative for Equine Infectious Anemia, which is a highly-contagious and untreatable fly-borne disease. Horses that test positive for EIA must be kept quarantined in a fly-free environment from other horses. Each state has their own parameters established for positive horses, with some requiring euthanasia. Not to worry, occurrences of EIA are very low. Results from the Coggins test should be available within as little as 2 days or 2 weeks, dpending upon the type of test given.

The strangles vaccine is a vacinnation to combat the occurence of Strangles, which is a highly-contagious and costly illness that can sweep quickly through an entire barn, resulting in mild-to-severe symptoms in horses. It can be quite costly to treat when given the number of horses that may become infected. That is why every boarding facility should require the strangles vaccine. There are two separate types of vaccinations for strangles, one is an IM injection and the other is administred nasally. Personally, I prefer the IM injection (best given in the chest muscle) as the intra-nasal vaccine has been none to produce abscesses within a horse's lungs. This information was obtained directly from a Rood & Riddle veterinarian here in Kentucky. There is a small possibility of injection site infection occurring; however, administering the injection in the chest muscle will provide for adequate drainage if such an infection arises. If Pica has not had a history of receving annual strangles boosters, she will require a total of three vaccinations with a two-week period between injections (i.e, first injection today, 2nd injection two weeks later, 3rd injection two weeks after the 2nd). Again, I strongly urge the use of the IM vaccine over the intra-nasal vaccine. I'd must rather deal with a potential injection site absess than a dead horse.

Happy to answer any other questions you may have.
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#20
I don't think I want to give my horse the strangles vaccine. I've read a few articles on it and they say that 50% of the horses end up getting it shortly after since they actually inject the horse with the virus to allow some immunization of it. Is that a risk to take?

Also, is there a TEST to see if your horse is a carrier of strangles? Because the guy wants me to have a coggins test performed, which I've heard of... but along with the strangles test, which I've only heard of the vaccine. I don't think he requires a vaccine, only a test.
*Tara*
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