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Buckles
#1
Okay, here's Buckles. 9 y.o. Quarter Horse mare, not registered, Hancock lines (I have been told). Dial-up here, better get to down-loading, or is it up-loading?

[Image: buckles-2webb.jpg]
And One More:
[Image: Buckles-1web.jpg]
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#2
From the first picture I can tell she has a nice hip.

I like her.


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#3
Thanks, she came to me at a very young age, approximately 2-3 weeks. Her mother had been sold to WSU for lactation studies. Raised her on goats milk, and Equine Jr. (it's what we have available locally). She's been a neat project, I wouldn't have bought her on purpose, meaning I lean more toward a little heavier mount, but she's turned out alright.
On this board I learned why she has a hard time collecting. Her rear is a little higher than her withers, but bless her she tries--it isn't very comfortable. So mostly we trail ride.
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#4
Thanks Hook! That's Better. The only thing that would keep her back from me was the flash of the camera, so when she'd start walking toward me, I'd take a picture, to keep her back so I could take another one.... not the best way to take conformation shots, I'll have one of my family help me, when someone is here, and I think about it, and and well you know...
Once these are submitted, can I say take the dark photos off? Or will that make the whole disappear
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#5
Sweet looking little mare. Nice round hip and a sweet face. Nice story too. Glad you bought her.
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#6
Buckles looks like a pretty good example of a well balanced quarter horse. Too bad she isn't registered.

I don't see her hindquarters higher than her withers in either of the photos. Her neck looks a bit heavy in the first one but not in the second.

From the photos i would guess that see has a nice willing personalty.

Nice mare.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#7
Buckles truly is a nice little mare, thank you for noticing. I do not mind that she is not registered, because I ride the hills with her, do not want another like her (breed her) everything is at 100 miles an hour; I work alot, just slowing her down. She's willing(to GO quick), and quick, real quick. She would be an excellent barrel mare, but I think it would be a lot of work not turning her 'hot' on the cans.
Her withers, she had none until the last 1 1/2 years. Truly her shoulder blades were even with her withers forever. I don't know the technical term for this. The last year and a half the saddles fit differently and better. I don't know if maybe now, or the next couple of years she'll be able to collect better. When she is asked to canter slowly, it feels like you are on a spring, not a gentle glide, but lots and lots of air time, she flexes well at the poll, but something doesn't seem right.
I am hoping for suggestions. A lovely mare, but does have to be handled carefully as she is quick, with a quick mind and slowing down (as she's ages it's better) is difficult for her. I wasn't sure if it was the Hancock lineage, I have no experience in this line, except this one mare? Anybody have one? General disposition?
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#8
Years ago, a friend had a Hancock bred blue roan gelding and I don't remember him being "quick". He was young and fresh, but never hard to slow down. Sounds like you've got a pretty good handle on her. She looks like a sweet little horse!
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#9
Hancock horses were , to my knowledge, solid working horses. Remember a large proportion of all of the foundation quarter horses were race horses. Folks wanted quick horses to work cattle and hopefully make little money match racing.

Your Buckles conformation reminds me of that of my Games mare, Sugar. She is an honest to goodness race horse with AQHA points and a speed index. She rides like you describe Buckles. Always "there" waiting for the go signal. Collection and balancing from behind was just not her thing. (She had four legs and every one of them always shared the job. Front legs are for pulling and back legs for driving so we can run faster.) Still one of the fastest horses I have ever ridden. She is retired now at 20 years old, 17 of that with us, with some progressive lung problems. Trust is a big thing with horses like her and when you have it they will work with you. We ran games but she also did fine on any of the trails we went on. Make sure you keep her exercised and her mind busy and you will have fun.

If you think her movement is not quite right perhaps a visit from a Chiropractor is in order.
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#10
Well you just described Buckles to a T.
For instance, when you put horses to work because they just won't hold still? She would prefer to work than hold still, for a long, long time. She'll hold still while I mount, but boy is she 'ready to go!' A "Yahoo, we're outa here!" attitude. Buckles is really fast, I haven't let others ride her because if they give a 'cue' she'll do it quickly, and someone could get hurt--I just know it. Buckles also compulsively worries a bit, to date I must have tried ten different bits, mostly a broken mouth piece, a couple of solid mouthpieces were rejected completely by her. She compulsively runs her tongue over, working the metal of anything. I have considered just bringing the bosal along for the long trail rides when I get tired of hearing the smacking.
She is honest as the day is long, she loves to do anything that requires action. Inaction is what stretches her. I know I can only ask her to hold still for a short time, as she ages the amount of inactive time progresses.
I will begin to look around for a chiropractor.
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