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Gad, I love the smell of the bush!
#11
I agree with Beccajane, yeah what she said!

Appygirl, I don't admit this to many. I detest poetry. I'd read your poetry anytime!!! You capture moments and feelings. And I'm NOT saying this to make you feel good, but when I read Morning Ride I really wondered why in the world I don't just DO that!!! I did that as a child, and as your poem described, there's nothing like being out there on your horse, hearing the newness all around you.

So now (I'm not kidding about this)... you got my tastebuds singing for early morning rides. So one practical question. How do you work feeding your horse around a super early morning ride? It takes Cloud a long time to munch through her hay (grain is another story). Could I just feed her a LITTLE hay and her grain? Load her in the trailer and hit a trail at 5am?? And spend an hour, reload her, take her back home and then give her the rest? Or would she get really snotty about being cheated??

Not kidding, friend, you described something that I now WANT!!!
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#12
Appygirl, that is a great little poem. Really conjured up a picture in my mind. You have talent in writing poetry!

OTW, we load up 2 of our 4 horses every Sunday morning for the trip to our trainer/lessons. We give them their grain first, then load them in the trailer with hay in the manger. The other 2 stay home and eat their hay as usual. Probably one of the reasons our horses hop right in the trailer is that they figure there's eats in there. By the time we get to lessons, it's all gone!
"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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#13
Thank you, Hook, Beccajane, and OTW for your kind words. I'm glad you liked Morning Ride; thanks for riding along with me this morning.

Hook, I have written several poems and have thought about publishing them, but I really don't know how to go about it. I used to be a member of an online forum called FanStory.com, but I had to unsubscribe when money got tight.

OTW, to answer your questions. When I trailride I don't grain in the mornings, but keep hay in front of Hi-Grey all the time. Since I bridle him last (after grooming and saddling), he has plenty of time to munch the hay before he's bridled. Then when we get back, the bridle comes off and he can happily munch again.

I encourage you to get out on the trails early in the morning, it's my favroite time to ride. There are so many marvelous things to see that you miss later in the day. The resident wildlife is very active early. I've seen fox and skunk families, wild turkeys, a fawn eating his breakfast, squirrels (a whole regiment of them), a marvelous horned owl sitting so low in a tree that I could have touched him if I'd had the urge. Once I caught a fleeting glance of a coyote before he jumped a deadfall and ran out of sight. The quietness of the trail is awesome; the only sounds you hear are those the forest harbors inside herself. The morning artistry is magnificent: an intricately designed spider web iced with morning dew, the glistening drops gleaming as the morning sun captures them; watching the soft motion of the wildflowers as the canopy dew splashes onto their petals. Yes, this is the time to ride out and just listen; no need to speak, hear the sounds of nature.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#14
Thanks, hmyer, glad you liked the poem, and I appreciate your kind words.
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#15
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

Hook, I have written several poems and have thought about publishing them, but I really don't know how to go about it.


Here is some info about self publishing that I saved.

You could also put a collection on CD and offer the collection for sale for a ..Ahem...modest fee...."

Do-it-yourself booksJACK KAPICAGlobe and Mail UpdateSelling books in digital format may have been afailure, but the traditional notion of bookpublishing is facing another high-tech revolution:The book looks like it always has.The new technology is called InstaBook Canada Inc.,the Canadian branch of U.S.-based InstaBook Corp.Instead of asking buyers to read the text on acomputer screen, InstaBook offers a very real book,but one that got to where it is by a digital route.And InstaBook Canada president Dave DiMarcantonio hopes it will change the way readers,content providers and retailers look at printing anddistributing traditional printed books.InstaBook Canada — based in Stoney Creek, Ont. —is essentially a self-publishing business, but itworks like a photocopier — making one book at atime.Thanks to computerization, a complete book-makingsystem takes up very little space — about twometres by one metre by less than a metre deep. Itcan produce books sized up to 8.5 by 11 inchesbefore trimming; a 200-page perfect-bound bookcan be produced in five minutes.There is such a diverse need for what it can do forso many different users, Mr. Di Marcantonio says,that he could publish a book on the subject.Anyone who e-mails a digital file or makes anappointment and walks into any one of InstaBooks'three current locations with a disk will be able toget the book printed. Within five to 10 businessdays, the InstaBook Self-Publishing Centres willproduce printed and bound books - made inquantities of one book and up."Anyone can self-publish their materials into qualitybound books quickly and economically, which iswhy InstaBooks are perfect for the holiday giftgiving season," Mr. Di Marcantonio said."Personalized InstaBooks will be around for thefamily to enjoy for years to come, and can bepassed down to future generations."The cost is about the same price as one would payfor a traditional book, CD or DVD, Mr. Di Marcantoniosays.For that price, people can publish family histories oreven the family's favourite recipes."We think that an InstaBook of this type is muchmore meaningful, far more appealing in it'spersonalization and provides much greatersentimental value for family and friends than almostany other gift that could be given," Mr. DiMarcantonio said.So far, Mr. Di Marcantonio has published familygenealogies, personal memoirs, recipe books,religious publications and bible study courses, andcollections of speeches.Mr. Di Marcantonio requires customers to have amanuscript written in Microsoft Word or othersuitable text processor.InstaBook Self-Publishing Centres will helpcustomers format, lay out and design the book."Pre-Press" design costs are typically $150 for thecover file and $150 for the book file. Self-Publishingcustomers with some computer savvy can do thesame to save design costs by following the How toFormat Your Content instructions on InstaBook'swebsite.For $249 (before taxes), InstaBook provides oneprinted proof copy then 10 copies for books up to400 pages in length. Graphics or photos can beprinted within the manuscript in black and white orhalf-tones for an additional 10 cents each per imageper book. Additional copies can be ordered at anytime for $7 to $14 per copy, depending on thenumber of total pages in the book.When selling the system to stores, Mr. DiMarcantonio stresses that basic training timerequired to learn how to run it will take less than anhour, and does not requires highly skilled staff tooperate — although the operator should have somecomputer knowledge.For stores, the system breaks-even with productionof between eight and 10 books a day, and iscapable of producing 50 to 100 books in aneight-hour shift, depending on book size, he says.So far, the InstaBook system has a home in threelocations: Book Express (Cambridge, Ont.), MonsoonBooks (Milton, Ont.), and at its main office in StoneyCreek, Ont. Front Page | BusinessSports | Technology Visit us on the web atwww.globeandmail.com© 2002 Bell Globemedia Interactive Inc. All rightsreserved
Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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#16
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

Thank you, Hook, Beccajane, and OTW for your kind words. I'm glad you liked Morning Ride; thanks for riding along with me this morning.

Hook, I have written several poems and have thought about publishing them, but I really don't know how to go about it. I used to be a member of an online forum called FanStory.com, but I had to unsubscribe when money got tight.

OTW, to answer your questions. When I trailride I don't grain in the mornings, but keep hay in front of Hi-Grey all the time. Since I bridle him last (after grooming and saddling), he has plenty of time to munch the hay before he's bridled. Then when we get back, the bridle comes off and he can happily munch again.

I encourage you to get out on the trails early in the morning, it's my favroite time to ride. There are so many marvelous things to see that you miss later in the day. The resident wildlife is very active early. I've seen fox and skunk families, wild turkeys, a fawn eating his breakfast, squirrels (a whole regiment of them), a marvelous horned owl sitting so low in a tree that I could have touched him if I'd had the urge. Once I caught a fleeting glance of a coyote before he jumped a deadfall and ran out of sight. The quietness of the trail is awesome; the only sounds you hear are those the forest harbors inside herself. The morning artistry is magnificent: an intricately designed spider web iced with morning dew, the glistening drops gleaming as the morning sun captures them; watching the soft motion of the wildflowers as the canopy dew splashes onto their petals. Yes, this is the time to ride out and just listen; no need to speak, hear the sounds of nature.





Well, you really got me going, Appy, I asked Susan (friend who said I could park trailer in her driveway) if it would drive them nuts if I pulled in around 5:30am, she said no.

I haven't trail ridden alone yet, would much like to. Cloud has done really well with other horses on another friend's trails. Susan said the ones across from her house are pretty neat if I take the right turn. And yes, I know it's not adviseable to trail ride alone but I want to give it a shot, particularly that early. What have you found the spook factor to be that early with the little critter population more active? Susan said her horse (now deceased) was able to handle dirt bikers and people, but would freak out if a mouse ran across the trail, lol. Do you find horses tend to be calmer in the early morning peacefulness? Or more jumpy?

Meanwhile, you really got me jazzed for early morning anywhere. I emailed the woman I've been riding with on her trails, and asked if she wanted to give a try to the beach (about 45 minutes away) -- low tide is at 7:30am Sat. 8Confusedomething on Sunday. Just sounds like a great time of the day to be out!

Really glad (selfish reason obviously) that you posted that poem. Please don't think your poetry doesn't inspire, lol, I could practically feel what you were describing.
Carol
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#17
PS Appygirl, I was asking Susan that question too (about the food). She said she would grain the horse but not do hay until she returned. Cloud only gets 4 cups grain morning, ditto at night, so I'd be inclined to give her some hay also before taking off.

But why don't you grain before going? That doesn't take long to eat. And do you let your horse eat hay WHILE you're grooming and saddling??
Carol
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#18
OTW, I'm glad my poem got you excited to try an early morning ride. In answer to your questions:

The spook factor is a little more prevalent in some horses when they are ridden alone in the early morning, but not all. Hi-Grey is pretty good out on the trails by himself and moves out and away from camp without his buddies. Some horses absolutely will not leave the 'herd'. Just as any time you are in the saddle, you need to be ready for anything. If you will be riding with a friend, my guess is Cloud will be fine. If you do go out alone on the trails, always leave a note or tell someone where you are and what time to expect you back.

Wow, a beach ride! I have always wanted to ride on the beach. Maybe someday I'll get that chance. It would be "totally awesome" (to quote my teenaged daughter)to watch the sun come up (or go down) over the ocean. Heck, I've never even seen the ocean in my 45 years on this planet!

You definitely have to post on the forum how your ride went, and I hope you'll have pictures for us.

Thank you for your kind words on my poetry, I'd be happy to share more if you'd like.

Enjoy your morning ride!
Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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#19
PS to your PS, OTW ~

When I camp and trail ride I generally only feed Hi-Grey his grain at night. The reason for this is grain takes longer to digest and may contribute to a colic situation during the day. I keep a very good quality of hay in front of him during his 'off' time. When he's in the stall or at the hitching rail. Having him happily munching hay doesn't interrupt the grooming or saddling process. Before I bridle, I'll take the hay bag away and let him finish up what he has in his mouth and then bridle him.

Also, I do not give Hi-Grey any grain prior to or during trailering. If the length of my drive will be over two hours, I will not grain Hi-Grey the day before the trip. If I trailer really long distances (like to Virginia or Florida) I will stop the grain two days prior and have the vet come out and 'oil' him. Again he will be hayed constantly or on pasture, just no grain. I will keep a hay bag in front of him in the trailer, if it will be a long drive. For short drives, he doesn't need to eat. A couple of things to remember when tying horses in the trailer and feeding them a hay bag are 1) a horse must have his head tied so that he can lower his head enough to keep his lungs clear and 2) make sure the hay bag is positioned where the horse can move his head away from it when he's not munching. This will prevent dust, dirt, and other small particles from being inhaled into his lungs.

Hope this helps answer your question.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


Reply
#20
Appygirl, I will mention the slower digestion / colic question to Susan. Cloud only gets 4 cups 2x/day (Pacer, I think Blue Seal) which isn't much, she says. I don't have hay in front of Cloud all the time, I give it to her morning and night. And she is totally rivited on getting it. Grain too. The way it goes is I come out there, she nickers and chortles, watching me coming. I give her a small amount of hay so she can't throw too much around, and while she's eating that I muck her pen. Then I give her the rest. Finally I get the grain at which point she stops eating the hay and comes over, nicker/chortle again.

This has become SUCH a routine that if I muck first (because she's pooped a lot and there's no clean place to put her hay bin) she gets really miffed! She'll do little jabby type jump toward me. "Hey, hay machine, you're not working and I'm reminding you!" I rarely don't give her something to munch on, but there's that rare time.

The other night I came out earlier than usual, figured she wouldn't connect to dinnertime yet, I started mucking her stall and she did that. (Bossy!!!) Whereupon I raised my voice, yelled at her to stop that, and then growled MEAN and chased her out of the barn, lol. She cooled it after that.

But you get the idea. So with that set of a routine (and it IS such a set routine), what think if I'm going for an early morning ride, I go out the minute I wake up and give her a couple pounds of hay (just 2 or 3) and then while I'm getting dressed, warming up the truck, pulling down the ramp, etc. she can eat it. Maybe just 2 cups of grain??? (Tell me if STILL a no on that, but I don't think her world is normal until she gets that routine).

The ride would only be an hour, maybe 1-1/2 max. So what I'm suggesting is same routine itself, but just half her already-small portion of grain, and just enough hay to take the edge off and complete her little morning cycle, psychologically, lol.




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