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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  1:13:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh - and my apologies to tchighhope also for hijacking the thead - I promise to start another one elsewhere. Now back to our regularly scheduled program - DON'T LET ANY HORSE BITE YOU: NOT EVER!
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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  4:08:53 PM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Oh - and my apologies to tchighhope also for hijacking the thead - I promise to start another one elsewhere. Now back to our regularly scheduled program - DON'T LET ANY HORSE BITE YOU: NOT EVER!



Still, I'd add to this one: Try not to put a horse in a situation, when she needs to "scream" to be heard. And this will remove at least 50% of "respect" problems!
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  4:47:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"Try not to put a horse in a situation, when she needs to "scream" to be heard."

That's good, Sara. I might have it tattooed on the back of my hand. Certainly most of the "aberrant" behavior I get out my own horses can be traced directly to my own negligence.

There are some truly "dishonest" horses that seem to pull every trick in their very thick books to distract you from what you're trying to get them to do, but I believe that's pretty rare.

"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  6:10:14 PM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Exactly! When Belka does something silly, it's 95% my fault - I can tell exactly what I've done wrong. Of course, I make her understand that she still shouldn't do whatever she's doing, but I correct my own behavior as well.

For example, about the only time Belka really bit me was when she was about 1 yo, and I was walking her in the barn's aisle because she hurt her leg and just had to be carefully walked 15-20 minutes, but not outside, as she got too excited there.

It was completely boring, and I think I was talking over the phone and she was kind of dragging behind me. And then suddenly she gave me a bit on my arm - but she really only wanted to tell me that she was completely bored as well and I just shoudn't have neglected her there.

Of course, I reminded her that she shouldn't bite me by rather aggressively backing her all the way down the aisle, but it really was my fault - if she was 20 yo she could have been able to do this, but she was just a child.

And she never bit not before, nor after this (except when she was very-very small and had her front teeth growing out and itching :)).
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2008 :  8:05:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message  Reply with Quote
This got me to thinking about a trainer named Mark Rashid; is anyone familar with his methods? His philosophy is that you need to be a leader, but that this doesn't mean you have to be constantly making a show of exerting your dominance over a horse just to prove you can do it. Interesting, though I've read several of his books, and I STILL don't really understand the difference between what someone like (for example) John Lyons or Clinton Anderson might do, and what he (Rashid) does.

I agree with Sara, it does seem like that whenever something goes wrong, it can usually be traced back to an error on the rider/handler end.

EZ2SPOT

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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/15/2008 :  8:29:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
When first getting into training horses I read everything Mark Rashid had written, and still keep some of his books around when they're not lent out. Really great-yet-light reading. A good horse really never IS a bad color! Between him, Monty Roberts, Chris Irwin and a bunch of other writers with similar philosophies, I was well prepared on the mental level. When it came to actual implementation, the trainers training me made a whole lot more sense than would have otherwise been the case. HIGHLY recommend reading Mark Rashid and his ilk, even for casual horse owners. No - especially for casual owners.

Funny thing about horse training... I've always felt like I was on the very first step of the stairwell to the Empire State Building, and still do. Then I talk to trainers whom I really respect, and THEY relate similar sentiments. Which makes me think I must be in the sub-basement. I only know how much people like Mark Rashid have helped me out, and hope that some day I might help someone else in some small way.
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 02/16/2008 :  07:40:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh, I don't think it is possible to ever get to the point where you can't still learn something new! Horses have such varied personalities...just as people do. And then you combine that unique equine personality with a unique human personalilty, and ANYTHING can happen...

I think I've owned around 17 or 18 horses, and although what I learned with one did help greatly with the next, they were all different enough that I could not use the exact same method with each. Not even with two that were full brother and sister.

Whenever someone comes across as knowing everything, or tries to come across that way, I'm immediately skeptical. Because I know it just isn't possible.

EZ2SPOT
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/16/2008 :  11:12:10 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the reassurance EZ. There's little danger that I'll start to think I know anything - let alone everything. Witness the rookie question that Mrs H and Domino helped me with in "flexion".

No, I expect that I'll continue to get the same feeling every couple of months at least: I don't know ANYTHING!. It really is only by the grace of God and the help of some fantastic people that I've been able to stay safe and keep our horses mostly well. But there is a certain thrill to continually realizing that I'm at the very beginning of a great adventure.

Watching guys like Clinton Anderson transform horses before my very eyes is both inspiring and intimidating/discouraging. Hopefully I won't get bitten today.
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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2008 :  05:49:59 AM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Yes, Rashid was exactly on my mind when I replied to this topic!

I think that while Anderson, Parelli and others are really great at a very actionable demonstration of what and how should be done, Rashid helps a great deal to understand what effect it really has on a horse!
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2008 :  08:05:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well said, Sara! Is English your native language?
If not, I am quite humbled by your ability. Heck - even if so!
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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/18/2008 :  4:38:25 PM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Well said, Sara! Is English your native language?
If not, I am quite humbled by your ability. Heck - even if so!



No, it's actually not , my native language is Russian, but I've studied English and used it a lot at work for a long-long time!
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