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 Caring and Owning Horses
 Horse Training
 Pawing
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BethAnn
Trainer



USA
864 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  05:25:43 AM  Show Profile Send BethAnn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Both of my horses paw when tied and while eating. I am sure this has been discussed before but this is now! What can I do to stop this? We have tapped their knees with a stick when they start so now they still occasionally do it while we are there but otherwise wait till we are 20 feet away. I want to do some camping this year and don't want to have to follow the hole to china to ride the next day!

BethAnn Stewart
Palmyra,Indiana

Lovie-gypsy vanner
Lad- Clydesdale


Do not take up the warpath without a just cause and honest purpose. Pushmataha-Choctow leader

Colleen
Trainer



Canada
940 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  08:49:01 AM  Show Profile Send Colleen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
HI, I don't have a horse but have learned a lot here on DE. I think they do this for attention. I have heard something about a pawing bracelet that helps with this. Maybe just google pawing bracelet.

Colleen who hopes to have a horse soon.

The air of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears -- Arabian proverb

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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5298 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  09:02:09 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I've read about tying a horse shoe to their leg so that when they paw, it hits them. It's a hard habit to break!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Colleen
Trainer



Canada
940 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  10:49:41 AM  Show Profile Send Colleen a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ive read the horse shoe thing isn't very safe because it can get caught in something.

Colleen who hopes to have a horse soon.

The air of heaven is that which blows between a horse's ears -- Arabian proverb

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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  12:26:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Warsong has always done this. In her case, I think it is the equine equivalent of twiddling one's thumbs. She gets bored easily, and is a high-energy horse who doesn't like to wait for anything. If I am near her or on her, I give her a sharp tap, and she will generally quit. If I'm not right there, then not much I can do. I've probably gotten used to it. It hasn't really caused any problems, it is just annoying.

There are probably a lot of things you could try, like using hobbles (after getting the horses accustomed to them, first), if you can't live with the pawing. I'm kind of a "pick your battles" kind of person, so I've never really worried much about this.

EZ2SPOT
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BethAnn
Trainer



USA
864 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  4:01:58 PM  Show Profile Send BethAnn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It actually bothers my husband more than me!

BethAnn Stewart
Palmyra,Indiana

Lovie-gypsy vanner
Lad- Clydesdale


Do not take up the warpath without a just cause and honest purpose. Pushmataha-Choctow leader
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walkinthewalk
Advanced Rider



USA
215 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2014 :  5:47:37 PM  Show Profile Send walkinthewalk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I won't tolerate it because sooner or later the pawing escalates to kicking or banging the wall while they're waiting to be fed.

I have to custom mix everyone's feed and do the bulk of that at the house but still, there is some waiting involved while I get each horse's (4 of them) feed pan ready. I also feed according to pecking order which immensely helps to promote good "table manners".

My Arab is the worst for pawing. He has been with me 20+ years and still will occasionally paw to see if he can get away with it.

By now, all I have to do is look at him and, in my most authoritative "mom voice" say "STREEEEETRRRRRR!! NO!!" and he does.

Back before that didn't work, he got his knees whapped as needed.

For whatever reason my 19+ TWH, who has been with me 17+ years has suddenly decided to paw. He is a pig headed horse, who, "no" to him means "why not!?" I am in knee-whapping stage with him but alas this morning, I yelled at him and stopped pawing, so mehbee he won't needt he riding crop to his knees anymore

I have about five hard and fast rules for the horses and if they don't listen, they are in trouble. Happily they are all so smart they have learned when I literally wheel around from the prep table, point my finger, give them "the look" and tell them they had better behave, they mostly stop what they're doing.

It's all part of manners and respect and each person has to decide what they want to tolerate.

The pawing probably will rear its ugly head from time to time just always be consistent with the type of discipline used so the horse clearly understands why it's going to the woodshed
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2014 :  12:37:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I hear you WITW. Seven loves to paw while anticipating food. Or when bored. I think he jus wants to hear me yell "QUIT!", because he always stops immediately and acts as if he never pawed once.

"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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