Daily Equine Forum Visit Horse Saddle Shop Read Horse Saddle Shops Blog Horse Saddle Shop Twitter Horse Saddle Shop Facebook Image Map
Daily Equine Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics |Recent Messages | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Caring and Owning Horses
 Grooming and Health
 How cold is too cold for my girl?
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

P.Evans
Tenderfoot



5 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  4:52:34 PM  Show Profile Send P.Evans a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi everybody...I'm new.

OK so I live in the northern part of Michigan and have 1 horse on my 5 acre "farm". We had that terrible arctic blast not long ago and I felt so bad for June (my 1 horse). It looks like it's going to get pretty cold again and it sounds like this should be a real cold winter. Should I keep June in the barn these cold days? With a blanket? How cold is too cold for my girl?

Pam E.

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  5:46:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi P.Evans. Welcome to the Forum.
There are differing opinions about how to handle your situation. It is common for horses to be exposed to cold weather without a blanket as long as they have adequate shelter from the wind, rain and snow. If June looks cold then keep her in the barn in the extra cold weather with a blanket if she needs it to keep warm. Make sure she has adequate feed and water ( preferably warm) to drink.

In our case our horse have an arena to go into for shelter and we do bring them in every night. The older ones may get a blanket if it gets really cold but normally they will just stay in the arena if it is windy or wet.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Go to Top of Page

P.Evans
Tenderfoot



5 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  5:59:35 PM  Show Profile Send P.Evans a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you Mr. Hook!
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  6:02:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Feel free to ask any horse related questions. We have many experienced hose folks that can help.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2016 :  8:04:27 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
ahh....The "To Blanket or Not" dilemma! I think all of us wrestle with this one. Welcome to the Forum, btw!

Horses are built to survive without much help from us so the answer is that your horse will probably be okay if you don't. When horses are blanketed, the weight of the blanket will flatten their naturally fluffed up coat which is what insulates them. Have you ever seen snow piled up on top of a horse's back? It's hasn't melted because of the insulating properties of a horse's coat.

If a horse is healthy, in good weight, has plenty of quality hay & warm water, can get out of the wind and stay dry, then I don't think a blanket is needed. You may want to check to see if your mare is shivering and blanket if she is. Remember though, that a wet blanket is way worse than no blanket.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2016 :  3:31:53 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Of course not all horses are alike, so there are no steadfast rules on how much cold any one horse can handle. You've already received good advice from Hook and PG. So I'm just adding to things to think about. On an average most horses are comfortable between 15F to 55F degrees above zero F. My horses seem to be just fine in the barn or out of the wind at about zero F. If it gets much lower than that (or for several days in a row), they might start shivering. When a horse starts shivering, they're body is losing heat. The shivering is the body trying to restore that heat. That's when I blanket.

If you must keep your horse blanketed for several days, it's good to take the blanket off and give the horse a good rub down before putting it back on. Also check for rub spots where the blanket might be bothering the horse, and adjust the blanket if needed.

And like has already been said; Good quality hay and clean water helps create body heat. Sometimes all I've done is throw my horse a little extra hay and/or some fresh water to stop the shivering.

I hope this helps,
Ginger

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

ILoveJoe
Clinician



USA
2499 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2016 :  3:44:23 PM  Show Profile Send ILoveJoe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi June,
Welcome to the forum!
I think about this question every winter and I feel that my horses are better off outside where they can move around to warm up and they have plenty of round bales to pick at.
I feel that in if they are in their stalls (my barn is pretty old and drafty) then they are going to be colder than outside moving around.
Candace




Go to Top of Page

Frank Somerville2
Tenderfoot



USA
2 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2017 :  08:30:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Somerville2's Homepage Send Frank Somerville2 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi
I keep my horse ( Frankie) in barn during the cold days and you should add the blanket. Everybody know that if you add more( good quality) hay you will keep you horse warm. I belive if you do this your horse will be healthy and in good shape. I treat my horse like a member of the family.
Go to Top of Page

Chuck
Forum Admin



USA
1265 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2017 :  2:38:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit Chuck's Homepage Send Chuck a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Frank, welcome to DE Forums.

With the spring like weather we've been experiencing in N Indiana, our outside animals don't have the winter coat they usually do...I sure hope we don't experience a March deep freeze.

Chuck

Horse Saddle Shop

http://www.horsesaddleshop.com
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2017 :  8:17:35 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Welcome to DE, Frank!


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2017 :  8:02:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Frank Somerville2

Hi
I keep my horse ( Frankie) in barn during the cold days and you should add the blanket. Everybody know that if you add more( good quality) hay you will keep you horse warm. I belive if you do this your horse will be healthy and in good shape. I treat my horse like a member of the family.



Hi Frank, Welcome to DE.
Sound like you have things well under control with Frankie.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Reply to Topic
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Daily Equine Forum © 2000-2002 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.14 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000