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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  1:19:17 PM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I'm looking at an Overo Paint today with some Quarterhorse in him. for trail riding. I've decided after a few falls from my Mustang, I need a dead broke horse who will let me make mistakes and reclaim my old riding skills before really working with Brownie Mustang. This guy is 12 & very broke. I'd be so grateful for any opinions on his confirmation. Thanks! Linda


Linda

hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  1:33:57 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
He looks nice to me, of course I'm not a good judge. Looks a little sway backed, but not bad for a 12 year old. I don't think it's too much to worry about. For the kind of use you want him for, I think what's between his ears is much more important than his conformation or looks.

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  1:39:46 PM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

He looks nice to me, of course I'm not a good judge. Looks a little sway backed, but not bad for a 12 year old. I don't think it's too much to worry about. For the kind of use you want him for, I think what's between his ears is much more important than his conformation or looks.



Thanks for the quick reply. I printed a photo of him and he looks sway backed in the photo, but doesn't on the ad. I'm not sure if that's him or the monitor. Will have to see how he looks in person. This is the only photo I have of him now. I really appreciate your input! Thanks.

Linda
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  1:54:31 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think the reason he looks sway-back is because his one back foot is so far out behind him. His off-side hip will be dropped because of it and could very easily give you an impression that he's sway-back. See if you can view some pics of him standing more square, and I bet he won't look near that sway-back.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  2:05:23 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I agree with Harv on what's between his ears! I don't see any glaring conformation problems that would cause problems if you intend to use him for trail riding. Remember to have the owner ride him first! If that goes well and if you're still interested in him, at some point you need to have a vet check and make sure to test for navicular.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  4:32:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I agree with PG and Harv. And if he is real nice & quiet...grab him! (After the vet check that is) Sometimes you just need something to relax on. I think he looks pretty good, even nicer if he has a nice sweet disposition and no navicular or other health problems.
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 07/27/2009 :  5:41:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message  Reply with Quote
He's gorgeous....blue eyes to boot!

Saw a horse this weekend who was amazing Western performance, does mounted patrol, etc.....is sway backed, age 5 but is one fit horse.

I'm not sure how it affects them later in life??
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2009 :  01:57:48 AM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks to everyone for your input. I really lucked out on getting a lot of replies! I saw the horse today. He isn't sway backed in person, so it probably was his stance. He is a very sweet horse, but I didn't take him. He had some issues from probably being roughly handled in the past which would be a spook hazard on the trail. Tossing the leadrope over his withers freaked him out but he calmed quickly when rubbing the rope on him. Tossing the blanket on the "wrong side" really scared him. He will make someone who wants to work with him a bit a really nice horse, but I need a bombproof one that will tolerate my mistakes while I get skills back.

It is a tremendous help to get your input on confirmation and I really appreciate everyone's help! THANKS!

Linda

Linda
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 07/28/2009 :  08:48:46 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Linda,

Not that I'm encouraging you to get this particular horse but most of the time, there is not an immediate "Click" when you find the right horse. It takes time for a horse to get to know you and your habits just like it takes time for you to know the horse's habits. As an example, I helped Dave get up his lesson horses one day which involved walking about 100 miles to the back of his place and leading the horses back to the barn. I can't remember now who put the halter on this particular horse but I was leading him when suddenly he realized that I wasn't Dave and he pulled back. We did a tug of war battle for a bit till he settled down and I talked to him and rubbed on him a little. This was a dead broke horse used for beginner lessons but he didn't know me and thought I was going to lead him to his death. LOL!

Also, there is no bombproof horse. Any horse can spook for any reason but some spook easier than others. Take your time but keep an open mind when you're on the hunt for the right horse.

Good luck!!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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ILoveJoe
Clinician



USA
2499 Posts

Posted - 07/29/2009 :  4:17:05 PM  Show Profile Send ILoveJoe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I like this horse, he looks like a nice guy. You may want to keep an open mind and go back and see him again. Take some tools and do a little ground work again and see how he responds. He may be more accepting of you the 2nd time he sees you.

The first time I saw Joe, he was indifferent to me and standoffish. There was too much snow on the ground for me to ride him so I didn't. I wasn't really interested in him until a few weeks had passed (I did NOT want an Appaloosa) and I had looked at other horses but I kept thinking of Joe and I am glad I called them back and he wasn't sold yet.

He did everything I asked him to do when I rode him and the 2nd time he started looking at me, like I was actually there. In fact now that I think about it, he would not even nicker when he saw me for a long time after I bought him. The people told me Joe bucked when someone else came to ride him and it wasn't until right before I gave her the check that she confessed he was a stallion until about 5 months previously.

But I saw the potential in him and I am glad I went back.




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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 07/30/2009 :  10:07:32 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Agree with ILJ, PG and Harv. Nice looking guy, but it really is what's in his head that counts. I'd do what ILJ suggests - see how quickly he gets over stuff. No matter how much has been put into him, there's likely to be some things that set him off. Consider "what does he do when he's scared of something?". Does he try to run off, or crow-hop, or just start and freeze? How may reps before the reaction goes away? If he desensitizes quickly, it shouldn't be hard to get him where you need him to be. If he's still freaked out by the same thing the umpteenth time you show it to him, maybe another horse would be better/easier for you.
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2009 :  12:25:26 PM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
PaintGal, ILG and ArenaDirt - Thanks so much for your input and it makes a lot of sense. I did work with this guy putting on the saddle blanket without him tied (like the owner always did) and he did calm down quickly and allow the blanket without moving away, but remained nervous. I tried to longe him (very gently) but he was very fearful. Flipping the lead rope over him was also very scary and he is head shy. He is also a hard catch with the owner saying he has to "chase him for a long time", but when I used advance/retreat I was able to catch him in about 10 minutes in a 1 acre pasture. He is a sweet horse and only tried to get away, never pushed into me. I know he will make someone a wonderful horse, but he isn't what I'm looking for, a horse that is safe now so I can rebuild my riding skills and work with my other two, one green and one not ridden yet. With 3 falls in 3 years I don't want to push my luck at my age with osteoporosis.

I did find a nice mare that I'm having the vet check Monday. She is very calm and has a great attitude, comes right up to you in a 5 acre pasture and puts her nose in the halter. She loves to go on trail rides and has done very well with barrels & poles. She is an 8 year old Morgan Quarterhorse and has won in Halter, pole bending & Western Pleasure. She is so happy to go places that to load her all you have to do is toss the leadrope over her neck and say "trailer" and she loads herself. I did have one little concern as when doing figure eights when the owner asked her for a flying lead change she did a slight crow hop, but this was the only time she would do it. It was as if she was confused and didn't know what to do. However when doing the pole bending pattern that she knows, she does it flawlessly without any crow hops. I will probably have a trainer work on this one thing as I'm not sure why she is doing it. Otherwise she is the perfect horse and I don't think I could find this many good qualities in one horse if I were to keep searching. I'll try to post a photo of her.

Thanks again to everyone for your help!

Linda
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2009 :  12:30:19 PM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here is a photo of the mare I think I'm purchasing. Confirmation wise I think she looks great but she doesn't have the wide Quarterhorse chest which you can't see in the photo. I don't know if that is the Morgan in her or her age of 8.


Linda
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/01/2009 :  3:14:32 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
She sure sounds & looks like a nice mare! I hope she works out.

Keep us posted!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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killybean907
Clinician



USA
1082 Posts

Posted - 08/02/2009 :  03:08:58 AM  Show Profile Send killybean907 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

She sure sounds & looks like a nice mare! I hope she works out.

Keep us posted!



I agree, and she has a kind eye! (I am a sucker for a sweet face!)





It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/08/2009 :  9:37:22 PM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thank you for all the well wishes and compliments on "Star". She passed her vet check with flying colors, no lameness, no navicular, back, lungs, heart good, conformation good. I asked him about the narrow chest and he thought her chest was perfect for a Morgan/Quarter. Guess I'm used to my big Mustang who's built like a tank.

The weather is finally letting me take my first ride on Star this evening. I'll let you know how it goes. So far, I adore this horse!

Linda
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killybean907
Clinician



USA
1082 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2009 :  04:47:51 AM  Show Profile Send killybean907 a Private Message  Reply with Quote

I'm glad that Star is working out so far! Let us know how the ride goes!




It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2009 :  07:43:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Congratulations. Of course we will need some more pictures. She looks real photogenic in the showmanship photo.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2009 :  11:06:55 AM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Well, the first ride was a dissappointment. I had stressed to the sellers that I was looking for a safe, well trained horse as with my age and osteoporosis, back problems, etc. I could not afford any more falls or fractures. On our first ride she walked the length of the pasture next door where two of her new horse buddies are, then refused to go any further. (I admit I was nervous, which I'm sure she picked up on). On insisting she keep going she started crow hopping. Unfortunately I had the bit that this horse has been using, a Tom Thumb snaffle with shanks, so I didn't dare try to one-rein her and couldn't handle it the way I wanted. I did my best to make her work just by neck reining, circles, backing, to make it more pleasant for her to just go the direction I wanted her to go but nothing worked. I waited for my ridding buddy to meet me and was then able to get her to walk along with the other horse. It was getting dark and she became spooky, afraid to step off a curb, etc. I had so little control over her I got off and walked her home. Of course the previous owners said she had never done this before. The next day I did some ground work and lateral flexion which she quickly remembered and was cooperative. I put her in a D-ring snaffle and we tried again. She was much calmer, but balked at the same spot. This time with the snaffle I was able to one-rein her, make her work and then she would go a few steps further where we would have to repeat the process. I didn't have a switch. No crow hopping this time as I had better control and could flex her. Eventually we met the other horse and rider and from that point on we rode streets and trails and she was absolutely perfect, calm, energetic and loved the ride. She was so much more comfortable in a snaffle and responded usually with a light touch. I could tell her bare feet were sensitive on rocks but she kept doing every thing I asked with a great attitude. She was very sure footed, non spooky to things most domestic horses would spook at, and a pleasure to ride after we got going.

In talking to the girl who mostly rode her before, the only time she crow hopped with her was when she asked for a lead change (using Tom Thumb). However, she does perfect flying lead changes in pole bending. I'm wondering if the Tom Thumb was the culprit mixed with some barn sourness she needs to get over, in addition to sensitive feet.

I'm going to have her shod ASAP and keep taking her out. I think she will work out with a little work. I'm also looking into the proper bit for her as I'm never using that Tom Thumb again, and I don't thinks she needs a training bit. She is collected, did barrels, poles and started reining training. She is 8 years old.

Thanks for your good wishes. As always, I really appreciate your comments.

Linda

Linda
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Montezrider
Clinician



USA
1284 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2009 :  11:55:00 AM  Show Profile Send Montezrider a Private Message  Reply with Quote

She sounds like she will work out with a little time to settle in and adjust. When I first started taking Monte out alone he was nervous and so was I, which he zeroed in on. I used an old cowboy trick I was told about by an old cowboy in fact. I would take along a bag of goodies and when we came to a real spooky place, we would stop and have a "picnic". Pretty soon he couldn't wait to get to the spooky place. Sometimes I would get off and just walk him for a while, then get back on and ride. It all helped to relax me and him both, and it worked too. Hope to hear more success stories about your new girl.

A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 08/18/2009 :  9:36:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LindaOz



I'm going to have her shod ASAP and keep taking her out. I think she will work out with a little work. I'm also looking into the proper bit for her as I'm never using that Tom Thumb again, and I don't thinks she needs a training bit. She is collected, did barrels, poles and started reining training. She is 8 years old.

Thanks for your good wishes. As always, I really appreciate your comments.

Linda



I think you are off to a good start. Perhaps a bit of groundwork to get acquainted and develop some trust would help. Check out the hints in the groundwork post.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/19/2009 :  02:05:34 AM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Montezrider


She sounds like she will work out with a little time to settle in and adjust. When I first started taking Monte out alone he was nervous and so was I, which he zeroed in on. I used an old cowboy trick I was told about by an old cowboy in fact. I would take along a bag of goodies and when we came to a real spooky place, we would stop and have a "picnic". Pretty soon he couldn't wait to get to the spooky place. Sometimes I would get off and just walk him for a while, then get back on and ride. It all helped to relax me and him both, and it worked too. Hope to hear more success stories about your new girl.



Cindy - What a great idea! This mare is an absolute nut apples. Think I'll bring some slices along next time.
Thanks for the suggestion.
Linda

Linda
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LindaOz
Trainer



USA
534 Posts

Posted - 08/19/2009 :  02:09:02 AM  Show Profile Send LindaOz a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hook
[br
I think you are off to a good start. Perhaps a bit of groundwork to get acquainted and develop some trust would help. Check out the hints in the groundwork post.



I think you are right, Hook. She has not bonded with me yet and vise versa but I'm sure that will dramatically improve the situation. Thanks for your input.

Linda

Linda
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