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 CRUISER GOES TO SCHOOL
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  1:44:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote


Well, there comes a time in everyone's life when they have to start school - regular classes, new ideas and lots of repetition. A couple weeks ago Cruiser started school in earnest. Last fall he went to Kindergarten and learned a bit about basic groundwork, learned what longing was about and was introduced to standing square. He then went on vacation and didn't do anything until the middle of the summer when he was introduced to having a rider on his back. We only managed a handful of rides before vacation time started.

Vacation is over, Cruiser is two and half years old now, and school is back in session. I had stressed about when I should start to actually work him - start him slowly now or wait until the spring when he was a full three years old. The vet was here to do Hookie's teeth a couple weeks ago and I was asking him. He looked at huge baby Cruiser, looked at me, laughed, and said "Start him. Your weight sure isn't going to do him any damage. Just use common sense with the amount of work you ask of him." So, Cruiser is now officially a working horse.

He is an exceptionally quiet and level headed baby that was born here, so if anyone is using his training as a guide, don't be upset if your horse isn't progressing at the same rate as Cruiser. I have never had a horse as smart and willing as he is.

Classes started with a refresher in longing. He remembered that he was supposed to go in circles around me, but forgot that he was not to drag me all over the ring, just because he felt that was where he wanted to go. He ended up with a stud chain run through the ring on the left side the halter, over his nose, through the right side the halter and then snapped to the ring on the bottom. It didn't take too many yanks for him to realize that it hurts your nose when you try to go wherever you want. We are now back using a line snapped to the bottom ring of his leather halter.

Because his body is not used to being curved to the inside on the longe line, we have been working on that. I bump to pull his nose in and at the same time I push with the whip to compact and collect his body. It is a slow process as he needs to strengthen some muscles and lengthen others. After a 5 minutes or so of this I then attach the side reins, as little horses really need to learn to carry and give to a bit. I attach the side-reins to the breast collar attachment of the saddle, and make them about an inch shorter than his natural head carriage. The idea isn't to force him into a headset, but to let him learn to carry the bit and to give to pressure.

Riding has always been simple for him, he just doesn't care that there is a rider on his back. Michelle is the saddle person and I am the ground person. Last ride, the mounting block was in the arena and we were in the outside ring. I gave Michelle a leg up, (Cruiser is huge now) and she kind of went flop/plop/scramble onto his back - I'm not a great booster-upper person. He stood perfectly still and after she got herself collected she laughed about her smooth mounting style on baby. He is such a good boy!!!!

The training is progressing well, we still have him on the longe line, not because we are concerned about him running off but I can give him some strong reinforcing cues from the ground. It is really working well. If she asks him to turn and he forgets to steer, I have the line attached to his halter and can get his attention back and insist he do as he was asked. If she pulls on a rein and he pops his nose in the air - which babies do sometimes until they learn to give to pressure - then I can just pull his head in and down. Today he walked and trotted and changed directions easily at a walk, but with more difficulty at a trot. He really does try hard to please. He is responding well to leg aids for the most part, and doesn't get upset in the least if they are reinforced with a few hard thumps if he forgets.

After every ride, we do a few minutes of standing up practice. I ask for movement of each foot and then expect him to keep it where I place it. We then do a couple nice smooth backups and he is finished for the day. We are trying to work him three days a week, and then I try to do some longing and standing up training in between riding lessons.

He is such a sweet willing horse, and is a joy to work with. Did I say that he is such a good boy?!!!

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  3:17:18 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Sounds like great progress! You're building a strong foundation and Cruiser sounds like an excellent pupil. He seems to be very mature mentally for his age and I'm sure he is because of the way he's been handled from day 1.

Where is Hook and his camera?? He needs to document the progress and share the pics with us!

Congrats, Fern!


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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killybean907
Clinician



USA
1082 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  3:30:33 PM  Show Profile Send killybean907 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I think that I would like to come to Cruisers school too!! He has an EXCELLENT teacher!

He does sound like such an honest horse...due I'm sure in large part to his care and handling up to this point. Kudos to the great job you've done with him....

Now, don't forget some more pictures!!



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  4:29:09 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Delayed reaction. Why I thought of this while cooking chicken for supper is beyond me!

quote:
Classes started with a refresher in longing. He remembered that he was supposed to go in circles around me, but forgot that he was not to drag me all over the ring, just because he felt that was where he wanted to go. He ended up with a stud chain run through the ring on the left side the halter, over his nose, through the right side the halter and then snapped to the ring on the bottom. It didn't take too many yanks for him to realize that it hurts your nose when you try to go wherever you want. We are now back using a line snapped to the bottom ring of his leather halter.



I tried to work Bud today without the chain but he wasn't listening so it went back on. You said you ran it through the left side, over the nose, through the right ring & attach it to the bottom ring. Is there a reason you do that instead of through the bottom, then left, over the nose & attach to the ring on the right? Don't you have to unhook and redo it to reverse?

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  5:02:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

Delayed reaction. Why I thought of this while cooking chicken for supper is beyond me!


I tried to work Bud today without the chain but he wasn't listening so it went back on. You said you ran it through the left side, over the nose, through the right ring & attach it to the bottom ring. Is there a reason you do that instead of through the bottom, then left, over the nose & attach to the ring on the right? Don't you have to unhook and redo it to reverse?



I don't have an especially good reason for doing it that way. Probably happened because when I put a chain over a nose I go through the left side hole and snap it on the right side hole, or continue it upwards and snap it to the cheek piece of the halter. I wanted to get his attention but I didn't want to hurt him, and yanking on a slack chain can damage a nose, so I made it snug around his whole nose. That way I can give him a yank sideways to get his attention. And yes, when you change directions you have to redo it.

One thing I did when Profit was young was to take a long dog choke chain and fasten one end to the bottom ring, then wrap it around and around the nose piece of the halter and fasten to the bottom loop. That way the halter noseband has bite all the time.

That is an option if Bud is going to keep forgetting to listen to you. You then just have to clip your line in the bottom ring and not worry about changing it for each direction.

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/12/2008 :  6:05:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Hook

quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

Delayed reaction. Why I thought of this while cooking chicken for supper is beyond me!


I tried to work Bud today without the chain but he wasn't listening so it went back on. You said you ran it through the left side, over the nose, through the right ring & attach it to the bottom ring. Is there a reason you do that instead of through the bottom, then left, over the nose & attach to the ring on the right? Don't you have to unhook and redo it to reverse?



I don't have an especially good reason for doing it that way. Probably happened because when I put a chain over a nose I go through the left side hole and snap it on the right side hole, or continue it upwards and snap it to the cheek piece of the halter. I wanted to get his attention but I didn't want to hurt him, and yanking on a slack chain can damage a nose, so I made it snug around his whole nose. That way I can give him a yank sideways to get his attention. And yes, when you change directions you have to redo it.

One thing I did when Profit was young was to take a long dog choke chain and fasten one end to the bottom ring, then wrap it around and around the nose piece of the halter and fasten to the bottom loop. That way the halter noseband has bite all the time.

That is an option if Bud is going to keep forgetting to listen to you. You then just have to clip your line in the bottom ring and not worry about changing it for each direction.



Ok, I've been thinking about why I do it this way. If you do the chain from the bottom ring and up it can tighten and not loosen. If you put the chain through the side ring of the halter, the chain that goes over the nose loosens when you give slack in the line.

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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appygirl
Clinician



USA
3211 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2008 :  09:09:29 AM  Show Profile Send appygirl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
We definitely needs pics for the continuation of our Cruiser Chronicles.

Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 11/13/2008 :  12:35:43 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have two comments on Cruiser's training:

When I get to the stage of teaching the horse to give to rein pressure while lunging, I prefer to tie the reins to the stirrups of a western saddle instead of tying the horse's head to something that won't give like the breast collar rings on the saddle. Also, with the reins tied to the stirrups, it puts the head in a better position. This is just my opinion, you understand. With the reins tied to the stirrups, if the horse raises his head, the stirrups' weight will pull the head right back where it belongs and the horse won't be jabbed in the mouth like he would be if tied to something solid. The stirrups work just like a rider's hands but with better timing than what most riders can do.

I also start my horse's saddle training on the lunge line because this continues the training the horse has already learned from previous lunge work. The first time a rider rides the horse on the lunge line, that rider is nothing more than a passenger. He sits the horse while the one holding the end of the lunge line asks the horse to work just like any other lunging session. This lets the horse adjust to the weight of the rider without being asked to do anything else. Then, over time, the rider begins to take control a little at a time until the one holding the lunge line is just standing there and the rider has all the control. Only then is the lunge line removed and the rider takes over from there. Of course I still continue to lunge the horse before mounting to re-enforce the lessons and to remind the horse what's expected of him once he's ridden.

Glad Cruiser is being so good and trying to please. That's always a joy for any owner/trainer .


"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2008 :  11:27:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

I have two comments on Cruiser's training:

When I get to the stage of teaching the horse to give to rein pressure while lunging, I prefer to tie the reins to the stirrups of a western saddle instead of tying the horse's head to something that won't give like the breast collar rings on the saddle. Also, with the reins tied to the stirrups, it puts the head in a better position. This is just my opinion, you understand. With the reins tied to the stirrups, if the horse raises his head, the stirrups' weight will pull the head right back where it belongs and the horse won't be jabbed in the mouth like he would be if tied to something solid. The stirrups work just like a rider's hands but with better timing than what most riders can do.

I also start my horse's saddle training on the lunge line because this continues the training the horse has already learned from previous lunge work. The first time a rider rides the horse on the lunge line, that rider is nothing more than a passenger. He sits the horse while the one holding the end of the lunge line asks the horse to work just like any other lunging session. This lets the horse adjust to the weight of the rider without being asked to do anything else. Then, over time, the rider begins to take control a little at a time until the one holding the lunge line is just standing there and the rider has all the control. Only then is the lunge line removed and the rider takes over from there. Of course I still continue to lunge the horse before mounting to re-enforce the lessons and to remind the horse what's expected of him once he's ridden.

Glad Cruiser is being so good and trying to please. That's always a joy for any owner/trainer .





Red Hawk, I also use the reins tied to the stirrups, but NOT at this point in the training process. Actual side reins, have elastic strips sewn into the reins so the horse always has a bit of give. There are a couple reasons why I use side-reins attached to the breast collar rings.

1. When a baby is just starting out with a bit, their first reaction to any kind of pressure is to throw their head in the air. If you adjust the side reins to just about and inch shorter than the natural head carriage of a horse, they aren't going to feel trapped, they can still toss their head up, but the reins are short enough they will learn to give to pressure. At this point I want solid pressure, so they learn that it is easier to hold the bit and give, rather than bump their head around.
2. The side reins, attached to the breast collar rings are putting the bit and reins in a very similar position as a rider holding the reins, so when the rider pulls a rein, the horse is already familiar with that action.

Tying a regular rein to a stirrup at this point, to my way of thinking, is asking for problems. If you tie the reins tight enough to actually do anything about a headset you can trap and panic a baby. If you leave the reins long, and the baby drops his head to the ground and gets a leg over the rein then there could be major problems. When a horse is moving, particularly at trot, the stirrups move around quite a bit. I sure don't want something that is flopping around attached to the mouth of a baby. To my way of thinking this is encouraging head tossing and avoiding the bit, rather than holding and giving to it.

In my training system, only one side-rein is attached to the inside breast collar ring, very loosely first. After the horse is comfortable with this, I add the outside rein. When they are giving to the bit and are comfortable, I will take the inside rein and snap it to the cinch ring. I leave the outside one attached to the breast collar ring. This teaches the baby to give more to the bit and to start flexing to the inside of a circle. When he is comfortable doing this then I take the outside rein and drop it to the cinch ring. This is where we really start working on collection and headset. Before this the purpose is for the baby to get familiar to pressure on the bit, and to learn to be comfortable carrying it. These reins are not tight, they have enough slack the baby can raise his head up, but hopefully by this point he will not be flinging it. If he is flinging to get ride of pressure, then I have moved too quickly and have to go back a couple steps and move slower. It is only after he is carrying the bit comfortably with the elastic side reins and has the basics of collection that I then attach the actual reins to the stirrups. Because he is used to giving to pressure, the moving around of the stirrups should just tell him that when he gets bumps on his mouth he should tuck his chin and soften.

I know everyone has their own way of doing things, and I follow more of a traditional/classic approach to training horses. When I was training Profit I was going to a well known Quarter horse judge/trainer for help and her suggestion was the same as my approach. Last year, when I had the professional horse starter come in and work with the three babies, she followed this approach, but with a twist. She ground drove them, and it was a joy to watch what she could do with a baby on long lines. I don't ground drive because I don't have the finesse necessary to do a good job at it.

It is ok that tying a babies reins to your stirrups works for you, but I would hate to see someone do this and have a major disaster because they didn't understand. If you use loose, and actual elastic side-reins, attached to the breast collar rings, you have less chance of a horse feeling trapped and panicking.

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2008 :  1:25:45 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mrs. Hook, I'd trust you with any of mine! All your points and ideas are exactly as I've learned.

But I want to add my voice to the crowd's:

"WHERE's THE PICTURES???"

Edited by - Arenadirt on 11/14/2008 1:26:30 PM
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2008 :  2:43:43 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Ahhhh, now I understand. I didn't know the side lines would stretch. That's a whole nuther ballgame.

Strange you should mention the stirrups moving with the reins tied to them. I have never seen them move that much except when the reins are not attached to them. I wasn't trying to say that your way was wrong, but just pointing out how I've always started my own horses to saddle. I learned this method from watching Richard Shrake videos.

Also, I never leave the reins long enough for the horse to step over them... and if they were that long, the point of tying them to the stirrups in the first place would be pointless and the horse would learn nothing.

One thing about lunging that you can't get with round penning is that the horse does learn to give to pressure even if he's outfitted in nothing more than a halter and the lunge line. The handler's pull on that line will teach a horse that once he gives to that pressure, he gets relief.

Glad we've had this discussion. I know I've learned a few things, but if I ever have another horse that has to be started under saddle, I'm sending him(her?) to a pro. I can't take the falls anymore.


"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2008 :  3:02:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk



Glad we've had this discussion. I know I've learned a few things, but if I ever have another horse that has to be started under saddle, I'm sending him(her?) to a pro. I can't take the falls anymore.




That is the exact reason why I had the horse starter come in and do the babies last year. That ground is so darn hard now!!!

Cruiser is just so sweet and easy, that I figured I would be ok starting him. Also, right now Michelle is the rider and I am the longer, but I am itching to ride him myself, maybe next time. She says he feels like a mature horse, and she has to keep reminding herself she is on a baby and to pay attention to what she is doing!!!!

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2008 :  8:15:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Mrs. Hook, I'd trust you with any of mine! All your points and ideas are exactly as I've learned.

But I want to add my voice to the crowd's:

"WHERE's THE PICTURES???"



Mrs Hook and her helper Michelle took these pictures on Wednesday.

On the lunge line showing the attachment of the side reins and lunge line and Michelle in the saddle.


















Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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killybean907
Clinician



USA
1082 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2008 :  10:25:15 PM  Show Profile Send killybean907 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Doesn't he look nice and ready to work! He's such a good looking boy!
Loved looking at the pictures...



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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carver
Beginning Rider

USA
145 Posts

Posted - 11/20/2008 :  10:33:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit carver's Homepage Send carver a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I agree with the program,we use the same approach.I also am a firm beleiver in ground driving all my horses.You are proof that if you combine common sense,experience,and breeding horses with a brain the sky is the limit.ride safe
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2008 :  07:55:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by carver

I agree with the program,we use the same approach.I also am a firm beleiver in ground driving all my horses.You are proof that if you combine common sense,experience,and breeding horses with a brain the sky is the limit.ride safe



Thanks Carver.

After watching Jill ground drive the babies last year, I agree with you, BUT after wrapping Profit up in the long lines about three wraps I decided that it might be a good idea if I practice more on Profit and not on a baby. Profit just stands still and kind of looks at me like I am a wee bit slow, and waits for me to untangle him. I grew up driving draft horses, you would think it would translate into the long lines - but it hasn't seemed to!!

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2008 :  09:24:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the pix Hook! Such nice relaxed carriage, nice head position. He looks so... willing. You're obviously doing a great job with him. The way he has his feet under him at this stage looks pretty amazing to me.

Ground driving looks so easy when an expert is doing it, but it's NOT. I almost got myself dragged around several times before mastering even the basics, let alone the fine points. Sandy still makes me feel pretty rank when I watch her working with the young'uns. But the results are nothing short of amazing; first rides are a non-event and a lot of cues are already established. Sandy has a way of using the inside line to teach horses to move off pressure on their sides, as well as to give their heads - by the time we were riding Lena she already seemed to know to bend around the leg. I was speechless.
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2008 :  10:50:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Thanks for the pix Hook! Such nice relaxed carriage, nice head position. He looks so... willing. You're obviously doing a great job with him. The way he has his feet under him at this stage looks pretty amazing to me.

Ground driving looks so easy when an expert is doing it, but it's NOT. I almost got myself dragged around several times before mastering even the basics, let alone the fine points. Sandy still makes me feel pretty rank when I watch her working with the young'uns. But the results are nothing short of amazing; first rides are a non-event and a lot of cues are already established. Sandy has a way of using the inside line to teach horses to move off pressure on their sides, as well as to give their heads - by the time we were riding Lena she already seemed to know to bend around the leg. I was speechless.



AD, he is absolutely amazing to ride. He rides like a solid broke horse. He is strong, he keeps his shoulders square, he is never unbalanced - the only word I keep coming up with to describe him is amazing. The trot, is nice and slow and balanced, but he tosses me all over the place because he pushes so strongly. With that kind of power I bet the canter is going to be a bit of a challenge to sit.

Michelle and I are about the same, so basically he is taller than the top of our heads - then add the saddle, so getting off means sliding. Michelle slides down in front of the horn, and Cruiser just stands there. I rode on Wed as well and I slide down sort of sideways behind the horn. Guess Michelle didn't realize what the whole process looked like (she is an English rider) until I slid down and went plop on the ground beside her. She remarked about how amazing (that word again) it is for a baby to put up with the stuff he does.

Regarding ground driving, I would love to have someone who knows what they are doing teach me. I know what you mean about some of the stuff a knowledge person can accomplish. Jill had the babies leg yielding, and sidepassing and backing in not very many sessions. I was in awe. Maybe I should just put up with Profit's scowling face, and work on driving him.

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2008 :  1:59:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mrs H,

What a thrill! Cruiser is going to be an absolutely rare ride at this rate. I wasn't too sure - you know how photos can "lie" - but if he is REALLY like he looks under saddle in those shots... totally amazing. I swear it took Seven months and months to move that naturally; first time at a trot I thought I'd get a concussion. (Of course he's much smaller at ~14.3) And he turned out pretty all right; Cruiser is going to turn some heads.

I admit to some jealousy - such an exciting time!

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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 11/21/2008 :  7:44:35 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
WOW! Cruiser looks fantastic!

I swear he's saying "Whacha want me to do, mom? Just let me know and I'm there!".

He is something special!


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Mrs Hook
Trainer



Canada
862 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2008 :  03:31:43 AM  Show Profile  Visit Mrs Hook's Homepage Send Mrs Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by PaintGal

WOW! Cruiser looks fantastic!

I swear he's saying "Whacha want me to do, mom? Just let me know and I'm there!".

He is something special!





You know Karen, you are right, he is special. Every time I do anything with him, its always "Wow Cruiser" and I can't take any of the credit, he is just so darn sweet and willing, and he is also really smart, so I have to be really careful what I do with him.

I had finished longing him and we had ground poles laying in a row, and I walked him over the, turned him around and walked him back over them. Next time Michelle came she was riding and she walked him over the poles and he tryed to turn around and walk back over them like we did.

I need to be very very careful what I do with him. Looks like he learns things the first time he is shown. Maybe I can just buy him some videos and let him teach himself.

Mrs Hook's Riding Log


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Horsecrazygirl
Clinician



USA
2132 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2008 :  4:49:08 PM  Show Profile Send Horsecrazygirl a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Cruiser sure is looking more mature these days!

Lovely pictures, thanks for sharing!



"In the steady gaze of the horse shines a silent eloquence that speaks of love and loyalty, strength and courage. It is the window that reveals to us how willing is his spirit, how generous his heart."

"The horse, gives you the freedom from all life's challenges." H.Z.


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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 11/22/2008 :  7:12:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mrs Hook
I need to be very very careful what I do with him. Looks like he learns things the first time he is shown. Maybe I can just buy him some videos and let him teach himself.

Ha ha! We had a maxim a few months into training Seven:

NEVER DO ANYTHING TWICE!

I am SURE Cruiser is going to be exceptional, and probably in ways you don't even suspect... yet.
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2008 :  06:39:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Here is a few more pictures of Cruiser's training as it progresses.

Mrs Hook could give you a much better description of how he is going but here he is going nice and relaxed with Michelle aboard without the lunge line while Mrs Hook is riding Flyer.

I think he is still growing and just starting to lose that Baby look.














Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Edited by - Hook on 12/27/2008 06:49:25 AM
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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2008 :  08:28:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message  Reply with Quote
He is absolutely gorgeous! What a handsome fella....and brains to boot! So soft..can't wait to see more! Keep the progress reports coming! (And the pics....he sure is easy on the eyes...hard to believe he's just a baby!)
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Montezrider
Clinician



USA
1284 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2008 :  09:03:59 AM  Show Profile Send Montezrider a Private Message  Reply with Quote

He is gorgeous. And quite an interested spectator you have there too!

A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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