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 The Beginning Rider
 Well, I rode Blackie for the first time
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  6:33:14 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hey all,
Wanted to share that I got to ride Blackie today successfully. We lunged her first in the round pen and she did well. Then, I got up on her and rode a bit around the ring. I felt pretty good on her and she was well-behaved. The only thing that didn't set well for me was probably the english saddle. I will admit that she probably works well in an english, but its just not that comfortable for me (I have ridden western for a while and we spent a whole week on our ranch vacation on western saddles). It was the right size etc for me and her, but it was just sooo different. I'm thinking about checking out an aussie saddle to get hat blend of western and english. I don't want to jump her and really would prefer to trail ride and maybe even competitively trail ride her and the english saddle just wasn't enough for me. Do you all think I should try the english again and just make myself get used to it(no offense to those english riders out there, but its just really not my cup of tea at all) or should I check out an aussie? Any advice would be great. :)

Oh, and one thing I have to tell you all and complain about:
So I'm in the barn getting Blackie all ready with one of the trainers on site and we're talking, enjoying, ourselves etc. Well, a friend of the stable owners shows up and just kinda stands there admiring my horse and hangs out watching everything we're doing. Well, no biggie usually and I thought she was just being curious and/or polite to compliment Blackie and THEN (and I just can't believe this) even though she knew the horse belonged to me and I was right there, she says to the trainer "If you ever hear someone who can't handle the horse wants to sell her, I'll buy her". I was like "What?" Then, she proceeded to get just enough in the way that I didn't even feel like I was working with the horse at all. Now, I can be confrontational but just didn't want to deal with it, ya know? I thought ok, whatever. THEN, she follows us to the round ring and stares at Blackie as the trainer lunged her, all the while making comments about how she should only be ridden english (even though she has been ridden both ways) etc etc etc. I am so glad I had sunglasses on because I was doing some serious eye rolls. Trust me, she just didn't look like she rides much or rides english correctly and just knows enough terminology/info to think she's knowledgeable. So time comes for me to get up on Blackie and she and her husband and 3 other family members I didn't know are all standing there staring at us!!! I realize I'm being a little sensitive but I was really looking forward to riding her without all the commentary and remarks about "If y'all ever want to sell her...." over and over. Yea, I get it lady- You like my horse! Enough!! Even my husband, who never gets bent out of shape about things like that thought she was soooo obnoxious. Anyway, long and short of it, she followed us back to the barn to watch me clean her (all the while offering tidbits of help). When I was done, I got Blackie back to the pasture and it was done. But geez! Has anyone ever had stuff like that happen? I mean, how rude and annoying! And its not like I could say much because they were the owners friends! Ugh! Sorry, just had to vent it all to a bunch of fellow horse owners. Just frustrating because it tainted what was actually not a bad ride at all.

Thanks for letting me spout off

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse

Montezrider
Clinician



USA
1284 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  8:24:13 PM  Show Profile Send Montezrider a Private Message  Reply with Quote

One of the down sides to boarding your horse at a facility is having to deal with people like that. There really isn't a lot you can do about them, but go on about your own business and ignore them. Sorry your special time had to be infringed upon by such an unthoughtful person. The trainer should have spoken up and said that the horse didn't belong to her as she is yours.
As for the english saddle, I would just get the type of saddle that you want and forget about what she has been ridden in. The horse doesn't care what kind of saddle you use, as long as it's comfortable for her. If you don't intend to show, who cares what type you use? Do you know anyone with an Aussie you can try? Or maybe check out the endurance style saddles. They are usually a little lighter than western saddles. I have two endurance saddles and love them both. They are rigged english, which I prefer. AE rides aussie, and can tell you about their rigging.
Bottom line... do what YOU want with your horse, and don't let yourself be influenced or intimidated by " helpful" advice.

A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  9:24:18 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Aww,thanks! I needed to hear that. :) You are right and that is the same thing I would have told someone else with this problem but when its you yourself, its hard to ignore them when you just want to grab them and shake them- heehee! Thanks again Montezrider! :)

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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andalusn
Beginning Rider



142 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  9:31:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit andalusn's Homepage Send andalusn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Congrats on the first ride :) It's always such an unknown when your first starting out. Sounds like having the trainer there was a good move. Another set of eyes to give you little adjustments etc.

Now barn people.. ya just have to tolerate them Even though they are really being a pain one way to possible shut her up would have been to almost agree with her. A Thank you, I agree she IS very nice and we are really looking forward to riding her.... I"ll keep your offer in mind but right now we are very happy. End of discussion. Of course I come across to people as upfront anyway so I think I would have just straight up told them I would prefer if you would not stay and watch. I really want to focus on this first ride. Thank you for your compliments. then ignore them they aren't important. In my barn I am already the odd one out since I have Andalusians. We ride how we want, are friendly, agree when people want to share with me how beautiful they are but just do our own thing. As for saddle??? well, saddle, smaddle. Ride in what makes you feel comfortable. Depending on my horse I ride trail/arena in my dressage saddle. With Nanse it just works better for trail riding in my western but more often than not I ride him in his English bridle. He is comfortable and happy so who cares what we look like when we mix and match. I recently added a Circle Y endurance saddle for my Morgan and that is a mix of western and no horn. Another great saddle is the Tucker Endurnce saddle. I find it's easier to fit that than the Aussie saddles. With an Aussie saddle quality is very important.

Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  9:41:10 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the thoughts. I guess I should also clarify that although this person was hanging out around the stable, they do not board there- I think they are neighbors from a farm or two over. They were just there...hanging out....obnoxious as you know what. Oh, and also although it was my first ride on Blackie, it wasn't my first ride ever by a long shot. Just first one on a mare currently at the end of her hormonal cycle (who was a freak-a-zoid 3 days ago) who is a little spunky anyway. Gotta love those girls! lol

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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boisdarcspringsranch
Beginning Rider



USA
86 Posts

Posted - 08/09/2008 :  11:12:38 PM  Show Profile Send boisdarcspringsranch a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Red, congratulations on having a great first ride on Blackie in spite of the peanut gallery! How annoying.
What is it about the English saddle that you don't like? Is it the way the stirrups swing back and forth or is it the feeling that you aren't as secure as you feel in a western saddle or is it your leg position? If it is just the leg position you could try a dressage saddle that will let you sit a little more like a western saddle. If it is the legs swinging back and forth or the slight insecurity I would look at the endurance saddles as has already been suggested. Unless you have some special showing needs I agree with the posters who say ride in what you and the horse are both comfortable with. I have one horse I go back and forth with. I show her in dressage but trail ride in a western saddle. She doesn't care as long as the saddle fits her. Have fun!!
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Montezrider
Clinician



USA
1284 Posts

Posted - 08/10/2008 :  09:04:16 AM  Show Profile Send Montezrider a Private Message  Reply with Quote

Red, one day after riding Monte, I was walking him back to the wash racks. This lady, who was new there, approached us from the front while holding out her hand towards Montes nose. He started backing away from her, and I made the comment, Monte whats wrong with you? This lady had the nerve to look me straight in the eye and say in a very condescending voice... You're leaning back, dear, that's why he's doing that. Well! I was blown away by her whole attitude, and just smiled and rode on. I later came to the conclusion that it's true that children and animals can sense evil.

A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC

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andalusn
Beginning Rider



142 Posts

Posted - 08/10/2008 :  10:59:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit andalusn's Homepage Send andalusn a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I have come to the conclusion that dumb comes in many packages. Last year early my husband had an equipment malfunction and his Aussie saddle slid, horse spooked and he fell off and then the rodeo was on to catch said spooked horse with the horse eater saddle.... when all was said and done we were back at the stalls untacking when "minnie mouse" comes from across the barn to give her .02 worth of advice as she has been "reading" ... Now this advice s from someone who one day wanted to know "why do you lunge your horse?".. there will always be those experts that feel the need to share. I just tune out the noise.

Now as for touching my horse... Forget about it. I am very upfront and direct. Don't touch my horse. If you have your own go pay attention to it. My horses really don't like strangers and will ignore those wanting to pester them. They don't mind stall cleaners but they do not seek attention from those not in the family. Many people only get to see our horses fanny's

Laurie
Andalusians NW,
Ridgefield, WA
Green+Green=black & blue(treasure the knowledge of an experienced horse)
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/10/2008 :  1:04:48 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Monte and Laurie- I am dying here laughing at those great stories! So good to know I'm not alone and as Forrest Gump said "Stupid is as stupid does". You know, I know people always have to give their 2 cents about kids and how we raise them etc but for some reason I just wasn't expecting it with the horse, although people probably give more with them! lol Its those people who have "read" something or know just enough info to think they are experts that are the most annoying. I tell people that although we have experience and have ridden quite a bit, we are approaching getting back into the horses as non-experts so we can continue to learn the right way.

bois- In answer to your questions, its more the security and wanting my legs to hang a bit lower. I'm used to western and like having them a bit lower. Also, I have one knee (post-ACL injury) that isn't the most comfortable with the shorter stirrups. Dressage or endurance are definite possibilities. I don't intend on showing. I just want to have a great relationship with Blackie and enjoy riding her for fun. To properly get her ready for showing, I would want to devote time to do it right. Since I also have a young son (6), time is a factor-at least until school starts up again. :)

Thanks for all the encouragement, questions, suggestions, and funny antecdotes! I loved them and it really helped. Maybe I can train Blackie to kick her when she comes around to bother me again..... J/K! lol

-Laura
(Red)

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/10/2008 :  2:29:00 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message  Reply with Quote
WOOHOO!! Congrats on your first ride! It's always nice to have that first one over with.

Sorry about the barn dweeb. Hopefully, you won't have to put up with her all the time.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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1Walks1Trots
Advanced Rider



USA
258 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2008 :  12:53:10 PM  Show Profile Send 1Walks1Trots a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi Red, congrats on your ride even with the interference! We board our horses also and can totally relate. We even had a lady who was out there with the barn owners proceed to take pictures of my horses AND me riding my horse without permission. I don't allow pictures of myself and really don't want a stranger taking my horses' picture without my permission. We've had many people hang around and just watch. It's completely frustrating if you have one you're having trouble with. Like my husband said, everyone from a fellow boarder to the cow guy (he boards cows, can you believe it) witnessed his involuntary dismount. Not only that, but the cow guy has to ask about it every time he sees us now. I was working with an onery mare one day when a neighbor of the barn owners came by. She kept hanging around and staring until she drove me insane. Then she decided to offer "helpful" comments. I was polite, but fairly short and didn't really do more than acknowledge her, but she wouldn't go away. Man, people are weird.

As far as saddle, perhaps a western style synthetic saddle would give you the security of a western saddle with the weight on an english saddle? Don't worry about bridle/saddle match. We often ride in western saddles with english bridles.

I sympathize for sure, people being around is definitely one of the negatives of boarding!

*Riding smoothly with Spotted Saddle Horses "Thunder" and "Sugar"*
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2008 :  1:19:49 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hey 1W1T (abbreviated-heehee!)! Thanks for the stories. Cow boarding? Okay... lol Anyway, I was laughing when I read your post because I thought "is she talking about the same lady??" I swear my problem person did exactly the same thing as yours. I was so tight in the saddle that the trainer thought I was scared stiff. I could not get my butt to relax into it and I'm sure I looked uncomfortable. Even though I said I was not scared at all and just hated being watched (eyeballed more like it), she treated me like a total amateur and even asked if I wanted to be led around on a lunge. Ugh!

As for the saddle, I think I am leaning towards an endurance saddle. I have nothing against the english style but after having my knee surgery and then my son (a 10 lb-er no less) 6 yrs ago, my body definitely changed and I'm just not as comfortable as when I was younger. I have always loved western (guess I like playing cowgirl- yeehaw!) and have never been that uncomfortable. In fact, after our ranch riding vacation last month I even commented how I was more comfortable in it than I had been before! And we rode for 4 hours a day everyday! lol lol How weird is that?! Anyway, since we plan to trail ride, I think an endurance will be the perfect blend between then two and will let me and Blackie meet in the middle :) My hubbie is thinking of one for his horse as well. Thanks for all the advice though, its very much appreciated. :)

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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Mr.1Walks
Beginning Rider



USA
81 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2008 :  4:43:47 PM  Show Profile Send Mr.1Walks a Private Message  Reply with Quote
People are weird. All of the stories Mrs.1 related are true and after the one with the lady who stared and offered 'helpful' suggestions, I came over to the barn to find her breathing fire. It's almost a given that we'll have spectators whenever it's least desired (like the first time my daughter rode my horse and was already crying when everyone came over to watch). Luckily almost no one else rides there so as soon as we're through the gate and past the boarded cows, we have the remaining 100 acres pretty much to ourselves unless they are mowing or haying. Or hunting. We'll be painting the horses orange this fall I think.

Red, I'm wondering if you'll have the same temperament difference in your horses that we had in ours early on (Half Arab/Half Saddlebred vs Quarterhorse), hopefully you'll have a better result. I struggled to keep my Quarterhorse at a similar pace to the Saddlebred, not that Mrs1. is a speed demon, but her gaited horse had a lot more get up and go than mine did. When I got the TN Walker we could finally ride together and it was much nicer to ride. Could be that Gypsy was just lazy, but we definitely struggled to ride together last year.

Sugarfoote - 14yo spotted saddle horse, glide ride...
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/11/2008 :  10:05:28 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Mr 1 Walks,
I will agree that the gaited horses have more get-up and go. I rode Blackie again tonight just walking and doing some trot work and let's just say she has a lot under the hood. She's not crazy mind you (well, she is right now being in heat and all), she's just spunky and can get moving. She's still a bit lazy on her cues etc and we'll definitely be working in the rings more before hitting the trails. Heck, I may lunge her to tire her a bit before I ride too at the beginning here.

I also tried out an endurance saddle a lady had at the barn (she rides her arabian in it) and I must say, I was really really comfortable in it. I'll have to make sure I get the correct one based on Blackie's measurements though (this one was a cheaper one and a tad big I think). Blackie didn't care for the little (tiny)saddle wiggle and definitely is a breath holder when she is cinched. I'll have to re-cinch her before riding. Still, something wasn't quite right with her. We would be going along in a nice trot and then she would just come to a stop. At first I thought she was being fiesty, fighting the bit, etc but it happened a few times and then she acted like she wanted to buck, but thought better of it and rear, but thought better of it. I think she was just uncomfortable in some way and I was really proud of her that she kept composure (and proud of myself that I picked up on her cues) :) Anyway, I think when we get a saddle thats just right and fits us both, the problem should be resolved. Oh, and btw, no obnoxious lady tonight so the ride was smooooth! :)

Was your other horse the same breed as ours? Half Arab/Half Saddlebred?

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2008 :  05:56:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Oh, dear, I guess nobody is going to appreciate an opinion from someone in the "peanut gallery"!

My horses are kept at home, so there's usually nobody around to witness my ground thumps; in fact, sometimes I'm WAY too alone, such as when I got hurt a few years ago, and nobody realized for awhile that I was out there in the weeds and couldn't get up.

But, anyway, when I do visit a boarding stable, I enjoy watching what people are doing with their horses. It often inspires me to go home & try something I probably wouldn't have thought of on my own.

And when I take my riding lessons, I'm conscious of the fact that I'm in a semi-public area, and that there are going to be people watching. I don't mind this at all.

I'd never interfere with someone's training session, however, and agree that spectators should keep their opinions to themselves! And taking pictures without permission is just plain rude...

EZ2SPOT

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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2008 :  11:23:51 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
First I totally understand where everyone is coming from when people who don't know what they are talking about try to offer advice to someone riding or working with their horse in a fairly public area. I wouldn't like it either.

BUUUTTT there is the other side of the coin. I can't begin to count how many times I've seen people do things around and on their horses that is down right dangerous and could be life threatening. Accidents just waiting to happen. I get so concerned about the rider's safety that I try to say something to them as politely as I can so I don't offend them. Sometimes the person is delighted for the help and other times I'm treated like some kind of a moron. But at least I try.

Then there are those that think they know how to ride and are interfering with their horse to no end. Then they blame the horse for it when it's the rider's fault in the first place. Again, sometimes the rider is overjoyed when someone comes forward to offer advice, but some get highly offended and tell me in no uncertain terms that they know how to ride.

So, I can see both sides of this discussion. Sometime the observer definitely doesn't have the slightest idea what they are talking about, but sometimes it is the rider or the handler of the horse that truly needs the help. It just depends on the situation.

I guess I should add that once the person needing help let's me know my help isn't appreciated, I will leave them alone. I won't keep harping on them about it, and their fate is now in their hands. I've done all I can at that point.


"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Montezrider
Clinician



USA
1284 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2008 :  11:33:11 AM  Show Profile Send Montezrider a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Most of us don't mind someone watching casually, I think. It's just that intense busybody stare that bothers me most. The one where you just know they are picking apart your riding or your horse. You can just sense their critical nature and superior attitude. I have learned to tune most of those kind out by just concentrating on what I am doing and how Monte is moving. If I can do that, pretty soon I am totally into it, and they no longer exist for me.
Notice that I said IF I can do that.... sometimes it doesn't happen for me, and I am just too uncomfortable to be an effective rider. My discomfort and lack of concentration communicates itself to Monte and it all can just fall apart for us. That's the worst case scenario... sometimes having someone watch makes you a better rider. Or at least it makes you stretch yourself in ways that you might not do if you were alone. At least that is what has happened for me before, maybe it's just my stubborn Scotts-Irish nature rearing it's head. My maiden name is not Kincaid for nothing!

A good rider has a thinking mind, fine emotions and a sensitive hand.-Tu Yu,72 BC


Edited by - Montezrider on 08/12/2008 11:39:51 AM
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Red
Beginning Rider



129 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2008 :  2:18:42 PM  Show Profile Send Red a Private Message  Reply with Quote
EZ and Redhawk,
I can totally understand your points and agree that the casual observer or even experienced observer with nuggets of info is absolutely great and I totally appreciate any tips someone gives me (they can see me better than I can see myself without a doubt). I'm not a pro and don't pretend to be above learning something each time. For me, it was rather the fact this person made many not so subtle comments about BUYING my horse (to both the barn owner, the trainer, and me- in that order with me present everytime) and it was not only annoying, but kinda creepy the way she did it. I mean she KNEW I was right there! It was as if she had been scoping out Blackie and was making the comments about the riding etc as a way to unsettle me and call into question whatever decisions we make about how to ride her etc. It was just...weird, ya know and since it happened on the first ride, kinda rattled my cage a bit (I'm of Irish, Scottish, and German decent too so I'm a but hotblooded like you Monte- heehee!). Anyway, it wasn't that she was offering advice, it was how the advice was given and the context.

Wow! Guess I opened up a great discussion eh? lol lol I love all the advice and thoughts though from both sides- keep 'em coming!

-Red :)

BLACKIE: National Show Horse
BIG RED: sorrel quarterhorse
JAKE: sorrel/chestnut quarterhorse
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2008 :  4:21:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I am probably guilty of taking pictures without permission. Never thought anyone would care as long I didn't try to sell them for profit. If you are out in public I think it's a part of public life. Never had a complaint yet.

Most ... people are well meaning with their advice and the more experienced we get the less it bothers us.

Hookie is just a people magnet and he likes the attention

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2008 :  09:33:47 AM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Hook

Never had a complaint yet.


Well, except that one of Tuffy!

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2008 :  9:10:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

quote:
Originally posted by Hook

Never had a complaint yet.


Well, except that one of Tuffy!



AWW Harv;

That was not an intentional shot. Tuffy bent over just as I snapped the picture BUT I DID miss eliminating it from the file on PhotoBucket. And I Did delete it when it was found and pointed out to me.

Some of the best shots of people are candid ones.


Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Edited by - Hook on 08/14/2008 05:53:16 AM
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spots
Advanced Rider

Australia
444 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2008 :  04:59:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit spots's Homepage Send spots a Private Message  Reply with Quote

You poor thing, i would have gotten off the horse and put him away if someone was staring me down like that (yes im gutless but need to get over it)
Im all for someone who genuinly wants to help you out, heck im the first one to take advice but i think some people are just plain out rude in what they say and do
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killybean907
Clinician



USA
1082 Posts

Posted - 10/31/2008 :  06:37:59 AM  Show Profile Send killybean907 a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow Red, what a hot topic!! All I can say is, BIG difference between well-meaning advice givers (even if it's unwanted!) and just plain rude people. Oh well, you held your tongue and proved that you were the better person, even though I was spitting nails for you just reading it!
As far as the saddles go, keep trying out some that interest you to ride in, and see what works for the both of you. I switched to western myself!
Good luck with the rides, and the lunging first might help with her "freak-a zoid" impulses!



It's not the years in your life that count, it's the life in your years.
Karen-Anchorage, Alaska
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SeaHorse
Tenderfoot



USA
8 Posts

Posted - 11/18/2008 :  2:33:42 PM  Show Profile Send SeaHorse a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Give that english saddle another try :)
It will make you a much stronger and more balanced rider in the end... I promise.

"My angel traded her halo for hooves then lent me her wings."
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