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tchighhope
Advanced Rider

USA
257 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2008 :  1:59:16 PM  Show Profile Send tchighhope a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My horse that I've had for 20 years bit me yesterday. Luckily I had on carharts, and 2 sweatshirts so no harm was done. I wasn't even sure she got me until the next morning when I saw the bruise on my arm. I had walked past her stall to feed the horse next to her and had my back turned. She was mad because I fed the other horse first. She went without her grain for that. Now, I'm carrying a hand whip and making her stand in the back of the stall until I have her food ready. I looked up some Biting Horse articles and a John Lyons trainer suggested petting and petting a horses' nose when it bites. That sounds crazy to me! I couldn't pop her nose at the time because I wasn't sure she had bit me. I know she doesn't respect me or she wouldn't have dared tried to bite. What do I need to do to reestablish her respect?

hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2008 :  3:49:08 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I disagree wholeheartedly with John Lyons on this one. If the horse bites, or even looks like they are going to with ears pinned back, I think the best thing to do is get real big and make him think he's going to die. Just remember, the punishment has to take place within 3 seconds for the horse to connect it with the crime. After that, it's pointless to discipline them. In your case, I'm sure your horse made no connection between biting you, and a few minutes later not getting any grain. Making them move away before you put the grain in their pan is a good idea. This can be very helpful when dealing with an aggressive eater. I think even a horse that does respect you will, once in a while, test you to see if you really are up to being the alpha. You just have to be ready to remind them you are.... within 3 seconds.

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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hoopski
Advanced Rider

USA
419 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2008 :  3:54:18 PM  Show Profile Send hoopski a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

I disagree wholeheartedly with John Lyons on this one. If the horse bites, or even looks like they are going to with ears pinned back, I think the best thing to do is get real big and make him think he's going to die. Just remember, the punishment has to take place within 3 seconds for the horse to connect it with the crime. After that, it's pointless to discipline them. In your case, I'm sure your horse made no connection between biting you, and a few minutes later not getting any grain. Making them move away before you put the grain in their pan is a good idea. This can be very helpful when dealing with an aggressive eater. I think even a horse that does respect you will, once in a while, test you to see if you really are up to being the alpha. You just have to be ready to remind them you are.... within 3 seconds.




I've read enough John Lyons to know that this is exactly what John Lyons recommends. But he goes a step farther with the lovin' on his head advice when you are not in a biting situation. I think the point of that is to allow him into your space only when you say it is ok.

Edited by - hoopski on 01/25/2008 3:56:48 PM
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Jinxnwv
Advanced Rider



USA
477 Posts

Posted - 01/25/2008 :  9:27:56 PM  Show Profile Send Jinxnwv a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Princess will try to nip you if you have something she wants. When she does it to me or Kylie we right away give her a soft smack on the nose then she wont try it again for a long while.... Now my cousin Todd is diffrent.... He wont do anything but yell at her for a min cause hes is affraid of hurting her but she has left big places on him cause she wants his beer! She has even grabbed him by the back of his coat and pulled him to her (though the fence) to get to his beer. I know I need to send my horse to AA ! LOL

Later Bye Bye
Love & Respect your horse & they will do the same for you!
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2008 :  09:27:31 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
In cutting (and probably a lot of other disciplines) backing is considered foundational. I train my horses early to back on a verbal cue ("Shhh" sound). I start this on the ground and reinforce it in the saddle until "shh-shh-shh!" sets them fairly running backwards. When I feed, I don't let them near me. If they crowd the least little bit I make them back off - WAY off, like 10-15 feet. They soon learn that they're not getting fed until they give me plenty of space. And I never hand-feed treats except in a very controlled circumstance where I can issue a come hither command. And even then I make them stand a few fee away and stretch out for it.

Haven't been bit by any of own horses that were two or more years old... When I am working other people's horses I try to go with what hmeyer recommends - as he states, the timing is super critical (3 seconds might even be too long IMHO), and you gotta know how to make the horse KNOW (s)he screwed up bigtime. Whacking wome horses makes them disassociate and simply get fearful, so the "punishment" has to be thought out in advance and cusomized for the individual.

Your mileage may vary...


"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2008 :  3:06:50 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
It's been awhile since I've read anything recent that John Lyons has written when it comes to horse training, but I've never heard him recommend petting a horse on the nose for biting. I've read his book "Lyon's on Horses" and watched his first 6 piece video collection, and this was never said.

On the contrary what was said in both is that any bite or kick, or any warning that the horse will bite or kick, is an act of war on the handler by the horse. Once it is done, the punishment must come within 3 seconds or the horse will not connect the punishment to the deed. The punishment should be something to make the horse think you are going to kill him right on the spot. It should scare the horse so badly and be so quick that the horse literally thinks his life is at an end and you are going to kill him. Of course, you're not, but the horse must think so.

If you watch horses at liberty; If the alpha horse doesn't like what another horse is doing, the alpha horse will either kick, bite, or lunge at that horse. It's quick, to the point, and lasts about a split second, but the horse on the receiving end remembers it and respects it. Not long after that, these same two horses may be seen standing peacibly side-by-side.

This is why Lyons says to go up within a few seconds after you have threatened to kill your horse for trying to bite or kick you, and go up and pet him. This is to tell the horse that you've decided to let him live, but you could have killed him if you'd wanted to.

This is what I learned from John Lyons when it comes to a horse attacking the handler or threatening to do it. Strike fast and within 3 seconds, then go up and pet the horse like nothing had ever happened. I've used this on my own horses, and it works like a charm.

As for the respect issue; When I feed or water my horses or am working around them from the ground, I never back out of their space or detour around them. I make them move out of my way and get out of my space. They know this and respect me for it. It makes things very clear that I'm the alpha horse in our herd of two. If I back down and retreat from my horse in any way, shape, or form, it tells my horse that he's the one in control... not me.

At feeding time; I make my horse back away from me if I have to enter the stall to feed him. He knows he must stay there until I put the hay down or the feed in his bucket and cannot come forward to eat until I tell him he can. I do not allow him to butt past me or snitch a bite while I'm feeding him. He waits to be fed, and if he does snitch a bite before this, I either put him outside or take his feed away until an hour or so later. Then, I try, again. If the horse is really bad about this, he doesn't get anything to eat until he's learned his manners and that he doesn't eat until I say he can.

Never let a horse tell you what to do. If you watch yourself when you're around him, you may be amazed at how well your horse has trained you to serve him. I was the first time I tried these things.

One more thing that's come to mind; Try not to ever walked away from your horse when you are in the stall with him. Try to face him at all times. And when it comes time to leave the stall; make sure he is facing you and stays where you've told him to stay. Then back out of the stall and close the door. Horses do not like to be stared at. It intimidates them. This really works well if you take on an angry stance... one that says you're angry without you saying a word. Stare the horse right in the eye and walk toward him like you're really mad at him. He should back off immediately.

All any of this advice is doing is making you the alpha horse in your horse's eyes. You're using body language and attitude just like the alpha horse would in a herd situation. And believe me, your horse will respect you for it.


"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2008 :  4:06:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Red Hawk:

Excellent!

I knew there was a reason I joined here...

"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2008 :  9:43:02 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Jinxnwv

Princess will try to nip you if you have something she wants. When she does it to me or Kylie we right away give her a soft smack on the nose then she wont try it again for a long while.... Now my cousin Todd is diffrent.... He wont do anything but yell at her for a min cause hes is affraid of hurting her but she has left big places on him cause she wants his beer! She has even grabbed him by the back of his coat and pulled him to her (though the fence) to get to his beer. I know I need to send my horse to AA ! LOL



I made the same mistake around Dove one time with the beer. I was short on time and wanted to drink a beer but had to check on the horses, too. So, I decided to just take the beer out with me while I was out with the horses. Dove absolutely fell in love with my beer! I couldn't get him away from the can! I did finish the beer... eventually.

I asked my vet if it would be okay to let Dove have a little beer on occasion, and he said in no uncertain terms, "NO!!!!" He said Dove has enough problems without becoming an alcoholic. You see Dove has heaves.

But when you think about it, just what is beer made of that horses are sometimes fed on a daily basis? Think about this, and I'm sure you'll figure it out. The main ingredient is grain. So beer, in a way, is really fermented grain. It's no wonder horses are attracted to it.


"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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ILoveJoe
Clinician



USA
2499 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2008 :  1:09:49 PM  Show Profile Send ILoveJoe a Private Message  Reply with Quote
I read that John Lyons advice also, and tried it on Rocky when he was nipping. He loved the attention and my arms got tired from rubbing his face. It is supposed to be annoying to the horse...

When Joe was stalled, I taught him the command "wait" and he had to stand at least 3 feet away from me (I was in his stall) until I put the grain in his bucket, then I would step back and say "ok" and let him at it.
It took about 3 times to teach him this (three feedings), every time he would try to push toward the food, I turned toward him and very firmly made him back up to the spot I wanted him, then I said Wait! Holding my finger up in the air.
He hasn't been stalled since last spring but I imagine a few firm repetitions would reinforce the command quickly enough.




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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2008 :  7:51:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message  Reply with Quote
My horses all know "Back off!", so I use that. The only one I really have trouble with, is Butterbrickle. She was always a little aggressive at feeding time, but when she got home from training, it was MUCH worse! I have no idea why. It took quite awhile to get her back to having some respect for me at feeding time.

I don't have the time to work on it with the horses I have now...but I had two geldings that I could alternately bring forward & back with hand signals...motion one to come forward, & the other to go back, then change around. That was sure a big help when I went out in the pasture with them.

EZ2SPOT
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Domino
Beginning Rider

67 Posts

Posted - 02/08/2008 :  08:20:51 AM  Show Profile Send Domino a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good responses here. It reminds me of my youngster who, from so much handling, began to think he was a dog. When I was out in the pasture, he'd follow me like a puppy. How cute!!

Well, he's a draft cross, and I knew that this could escalate into problems later if I didn't get him to respect my space.

As he grew--a lot!--I realized that his entering my space at will was just an invitation for more display of dominance.

Quickly I taught him to STOP when my hand is raised in front of him. It's a safe distance. Then I walk up and enter his space and pet him. Even in the pasture, now, he'll follow; but if he gets too close, I put my hand up; he stops; with just one quick-step (and I don't mean ballroom dancing!) my draft-cross horses could do some serious damange without meaning to.

I think a bite isn't the FIRST sign of dominance. You know how youngsters try to nibble (you see them pulling at each other's skin); My guy tried it once. I reacted as though the sky were falling. I don't think it was the rap on his mouth when he did it that stopped the behavior (with a human, anyhow), but rather, my total over-reaction with my whole body that scared him nearly to death. He'll smell my hand, but he's never tried to take a bite since. I think John Lyons has mentioned rubbing a young horses nose--it's very annoying to the horse--when young horses try to mouth you in any way. I don't think I'd even think about doing this with an adult horse that made such an aggressive move. A bite and a kick, to me, are all-out war; and you had better win it.

But don't you think it starts with how much respect the horse has for you and for your pesonal space? And, as others have said here, getting him to back off when told is a good way of defusing any kind of aggressive response--bite or kick.

Domino

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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2008 :  2:49:20 PM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hi!
I'm new to this forum and so far have only been reading other topics without replying, but this one, I guess, touches some issues that are really interesting to me, so, here is my weird thought on the matter.

I completely agree with everything that has been written, but at the same time - if I had a horse for 20 years (and as far as I understood she was quite respectful all these years or at least lately?) and then she suddenly bit me - it would make me think. Horses have a very limited set of methods to communicate with us, especially in the circumstances that they think are extreme. My impression is that in this situation she was just desperate to be heard.

I think that if we want unconditional respect from our horses we must show them that we do respect them as well - that is, if we want to be respected as a guide and not as a policeman. I think that respect and leadership are not mutually exclusive, but this is a somewhat philosophical question: how much respect we can show without sacrifising a leadership position?

quote:
Never let a horse tell you what to do

Is it really so? Sometimes they might know better... I think. The question is: how do we tell when exactly? :)

I this specific situation I would probably think of feeding her first, if it's possible... This will definitely not make her lose the respect to the feeder, but will also not make her humiliated by watching someone lower in the rank be fed first.
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2008 :  3:34:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
"Never let a horse tell you what to do"

Is it really so? Sometimes they might know better...

No doubt about it, in my mind. The annals (and my own limited experience) are full of anecdotes about situations where the horse knows better than the rider. But that doesn't mean you gotta allow the horse to think he's telling you what to do. The "trick" is to take advantage of the information you get from the animal while making him/her think it was YOUR idea. Not hard, really.

Last sunmmer fording a small river near our place, my QH balked at the crossing I selected. We'd been across at that spot before without incident, so when he gave it "the look" I knew something had to be different. The light was such that I couldn't really see the whole river bottom. So I turned him around as if we never intended to cross there, rode about a quarter mile loop and came back to another spot just a few yards upstream from the first. He didn't hesitate. When we got to the middle of crossing I looked downstream and sure enough - there was a pretty big log that had somehow gotten wedged on the bottom in the middle of the first crossing. Not that it posed a huge hazard, but still not the option I'd have chosen if I'd known.

You can take your horse's advice without letting him/her be the boss.

"There is something about the outside of a horse...that is good for the inside of a man." ~Winston Churchill~
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Sara
Beginning Rider

Russia
90 Posts

Posted - 02/11/2008 :  4:32:47 PM  Show Profile Send Sara a Private Message  Reply with Quote
That's great of you to have noticed the "look" and not start insisting!

My older mare, for example, doesn't like muddy places - may be she's got some bad experience in the past. Most of the times I could persuade her to cross over, but if she refused completely - I knew that for our sake I'd better find another way around.

And my young one follows me practically everywhere - so I once almost got her drowned in a swamp... I didn't know it was there, at first it seemed just to be some wet grass. And the next moment she was sinking in and strugling hard to get out and sinking more... This made me think a lot - do I really want my horse to follow me always? And do I really deserve the trust that I want?

In general I know that she is a very respectful and willing horse and will always try for me. So if she in some cases starts to behave "disrespectfully" the first thing that I think: may be it's really too much for her?!

Of course, if a horse is generally spoiled, it's another case :)
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2008 :  11:00:55 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
The problem here is that you are talking about a 1000 pound animal, and once that 1000 pound animal thinks he can do something without asking if it's okay to do it first, he will start to think he can do anything on his own all the time. The first consideration when you are working with a horse or even if you are just around them is YOUR SAFETY. Horses don't always take into consideration how much bigger they are than you when they do things on their own, and many think you are just another horse. If you let them tell you what to do and you let them do things on their own, it can have dire consequences that could even be life threatening.

A bite... any bite... is an act of war declared by the horse. It should never be allowed. That horse has enough strength to break your bones if the horse is so inclined. This is why it is so vitally important that it is never allowed in any way, shape or form. To do so, is to put yourself in serious danger. Also, the horse won't know the difference between you and anyone else who happens to get too close to him. A guest in your barn could be bitten and you'd be liable for it.

Watch horses in a herd situation. The alpha horse NEVER lets any horse bite him, kick him, or run him off from anything. Is the alpha horse respected by the other horses? Definitely. They also look to the alpha horse to alert them to danger, to lead them to the best forage and where to find water. They look to this horse for leadership and "ask" him what to do when the situation calls for it. They never "tell" that alpha horse anything.

This is the role that you should have with your horse. It will keep you safe and out of harms way even if what your horse does on his own was not meant to harm you in the first place. PLEASE... for your own personal safety and a good continued relationship with your horse...NEVER LET A HORSE EVER DO ANYTHING ON HIS OWN. He should ALWAYS ask your permission to do it first before ever doing it. Then, you may decide whether it's okay for the horse to do it or not.

When I hadn't had Terra very long, she loved to have her withers scratched and still does. I obliged her with this favoritism every day until the time came that she began to demand it. I had something I had to do out in the pasture, and she came up to see me. I didn't have time to scratch her that day, but she kept blocking me off and demanding that I give her a scratch. You see, I had taught her that this was permissable by scratching her every day. It took my balled up fist in her chest and my boot in her side before she finally understood that she had to get out of my way and she was not going to get scratched until I was ready to do it. It took a couple of times doing this before one day, she came up and stood by me and gave me this look that said plain as day, "Please, if it's not too much trouble, would you scratch my withers?" I did so, and she moved away as polite as can be. No more blocking me off and saying, "Hey, you're not done until I say you're done scratching me." She knew I wouldn't give her any more, and it was my idea to scratch her... not hers.

Does Terra still respect me? Oh, yes. Does she still ask me if it's okay to do something before she does it on her own? Well... 90% of the time or more. Are we still bonded and are partners? You betcha!

So, be that alpha horse in your herd of two. It will reap you huge rewards in your relationship with your horse in the long run and it will keep you safe and in one piece by avoiding some terrible wrecks and misunderstandings with your horse.

You want your horse to respect you? Then treat him like a horse and not a person. Learn how horses interact with each other and apply it to how you treat your horse everyday. A horse doesn't think or act like a human being, and the only way they can think or act is like a horse. Otherwise you are just asking for all kind of problems that could end up with you getting seriously hurt and teaching your horse all kinds of bad habits that will be very difficult to fix.

*************************************************************
Okay, I just went back and read the examples given by you folks. Yes, by all means if a horse balks at something, find out why before forcing the horse to do it. This is not a horse doing something on his own but letting you know something is wrong. This is totally different from a horse biting you or kicking you. A bite or a kick should never be allowed and the age of the horse or the situation associated with that kick or bite should make no difference.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown

Edited by - Red Hawk on 02/12/2008 11:06:45 AM
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2008 :  1:10:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Good stuff RedHawk, and I even go one step further: I don't let any of my horses turn away from me - EVER. Not in the round pen (except if they're asked for an outside turn), not on the ground and not in their stalls. If they show me their rear end, they're going to get chased and made to work at the very least. If they're in a stall where I can't safely make them work, I'll whack their butt with whatever is handy. It doesn't take long before they know to face you. I got that from reading advice like the above from other trainers, and watching herds in an open field. Not only does the Alpha never get kicked or bitten, (s)he never lets another horse turn their back to them, and is only frontally approached on invitation. I figure if it's good enough for them, it ought to work for me. And it sure seems to.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  10:01:17 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Arenadirt

Good stuff RedHawk, and I even go one step further: I don't let any of my horses turn away from me - EVER. Not in the round pen (except if they're asked for an outside turn), not on the ground and not in their stalls. If they show me their rear end, they're going to get chased and made to work at the very least. If they're in a stall where I can't safely make them work, I'll whack their butt with whatever is handy. It doesn't take long before they know to face you. I got that from reading advice like the above from other trainers, and watching herds in an open field. Not only does the Alpha never get kicked or bitten, (s)he never lets another horse turn their back to them, and is only frontally approached on invitation. I figure if it's good enough for them, it ought to work for me. And it sure seems to.



Excellent advice as well AD. Very well said.

I, too, make sure my horse is facing me when I'm in a stall with them. I want them focused on me whenever I'm around them, and they can't do that if they are not facing me with their ears pricked in my direction at least off and on whether they are in a stall or not. This is also something I do when feeding my horses. I make sure those ears come forward at least briefly when I feed. No feed until those ears come forward. If the ears are back, the handler is training that horse to act like he's protecting his feed instead of accepting it in a calm manner.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  10:56:33 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Wow. Some things seem to be universal...

When my partner/trainer and I picked up "Barlena's Peppy Playgirl" from the breeder as a weanling, she was just a dream (or so we thought). Sandy (partner in the horse) runs a training facility*, and has started hundreds of horses and trained and ridden champions of every description. I'm a rank novice next to her 35+ years, so of course that's where we brought "Lena". The filly (drop dead gorgeous liver chestnut with an Arab-looking little head, barrel chest and butt as big as Baltimore) took a 3-hour trailer ride like she'd doing it all her life, got out of the trailer and walked into the barn with her head down like she had always lived there (in fact she'd never been off the property where she was born), straight to the feed bucket and began munching. We thought her demeanor was pretty incredible... until the next feeding time. When she saw hay coming her way, she pinned her ears and whirled around - scary, even from tiny ~6 month old thing.

It took almost two weeks to convince her to face the gate and keep her ears up at feeding time. And more than another month before you could lead another horse past her gate while she was eating without the ear-pinning thing. Large part of the problem was that people were leading horses past her (she was next to last in a row of 16) all the time, and most didn't take the time to correct her when she'd do that. I don't blame them - training a weanling wasn't on their list of responsibilities and they already had another horse in hand. But it taught me something about the importance of consistency and firmness in early training - I bet she would have learned in a couple of days if we had instructed everyone else in how to deal with her in that situation and made sure they followed through.

* http://www.victoryhilltraining.com/

Edited by - Arenadirt on 02/13/2008 10:59:33 AM
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  11:16:18 AM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Lena, ready for her second-ever ride last summer. Sandy is the pair of legs checking her cinch...




Hmmm. That didn't work. Is there some trick to posting pictures here? Do I have to upload to the Daily Equine site somehow?

Lets try another one that I KNOW is formatted correctly... this is Safari Seven...



No love there... I'll await someone's advice. Thanks!


Edited by - Arenadirt on 02/13/2008 11:21:12 AM
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  11:31:02 AM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Arenadirt, check this topic:

http://www.dailyequine.com/forums/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4764


"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  12:07:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Okay, lets try that...

Lena?

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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  12:11:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Waddya know! Thanks, Hmeyer. Here's the one of "Seven" - all out of position - bit on the cow's fake to his left (I must have fallen for it too) and got his head way to high on the recovery... but didn't lose the cow!


Rackin' up some post count now... I'll be a beginning rider 'fore ye know it!
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  12:44:50 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Great looking horses, AD. Looks like you've got a pretty good seat on Seven, too. I love messing with the cows, too, only there's no way I could stay on a good cutting horse. I just like to push 'em around a little.
A quick way for you to rack up a bunch more posts is to send us a whole gob more pictures!

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  12:58:19 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hey Arenadirt, I just checked out the Victory Hill website. Nice! I had forgotten where you are located. That is some of my favorite country of all! Have been out that way a couple of times, camped at Garfield and Monarch Park near Monarch Pass. Also was impressed by what the Arkansas River did at Royal Gorge. Man, you live in some REAL country. Just love the San Juan's. Ever do any trail rides? Would love to see pics of that.

Oops! Sorry tchighhope, kinda got a little off topic here.

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer



Edited by - hmeyer on 02/13/2008 1:00:06 PM
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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  1:06:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Thanks Hmeyer,

Lena's real "prospect", Seven is my... uh, housepet - much as I hate to admit it. A sweeter animal I've never known. It's easy to stay n a cutting horse if it happens to be one you raised from a pup and trained from day one. I'm no cutting expert - only about four years into it seriously - but I have learned a couple things: stay in the middle, keep a loose rein, and HANG ON TO THE HORN! Well, that's three things. I'm a quick study.

Now, to make ILoveJoe feel even better about that gorgeous spread, here's the current view from our deck. Yikes.




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Arenadirt
Trainer

USA
670 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2008 :  1:10:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Arenadirt's Homepage Send Arenadirt a Private Message  Reply with Quote
Hmeyer, Amazed that you're familiar with this little backwater! We've been here about 12 years and I've covered maybe 2% of the trails within 10 miles of the house. Not for lack of trying, though - we get out at least a couple dozen or so times per summer. One could spend a lifetime just moseying about on horseback. And not a bad way to spend a lifetime at that! If you're EVER headed this way again, please let me know.
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