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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  09:52:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
OTW: would be easier to figure out, if there were definitive answers to questions. Concerning bits and the names of them, seems there is a lot of controversy and different opinions on what each bit is called. At this point, I've decided it really doesn't matter to me. I'll just stick to what works and simply call whatever I use ... "a bit".
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  09:52:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
OTW: would be easier to figure out, if there were definitive answers to questions. Concerning bits and the names of them, seems there is a lot of controversy and different opinions on what each bit is called. At this point, I've decided it really doesn't matter to me. I'll just stick to what works and simply call whatever I use ... "a bit".
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Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  1:34:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
Perhaps Stormie could write up a definitions of different bit and what their attibutes are used for.

eg. Full Face Snaffle: Usually "D" rings on each side where the headstall AND the reins attach to, no curb strap is used. Often has an extended piece of metal above and below where the mouthpiece is of about 7" in length, used to "push" against the side of the face when the mouthpiece is drawn through the mouth (horse not ours) when applying direct reining. Mouthpiece is broken in the middle. Used as a traing bit.

Something like that, but don't take what I just posted as gospel!! It's just an example/idea.

Ree7.. perhaps if you had two "bits" you'd then have a Quarter!

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
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Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  1:34:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
Perhaps Stormie could write up a definitions of different bit and what their attibutes are used for.

eg. Full Face Snaffle: Usually "D" rings on each side where the headstall AND the reins attach to, no curb strap is used. Often has an extended piece of metal above and below where the mouthpiece is of about 7" in length, used to "push" against the side of the face when the mouthpiece is drawn through the mouth (horse not ours) when applying direct reining. Mouthpiece is broken in the middle. Used as a traing bit.

Something like that, but don't take what I just posted as gospel!! It's just an example/idea.

Ree7.. perhaps if you had two "bits" you'd then have a Quarter!

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  1:44:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
That's ok, Frost. No need for Stormie to waste words trying to explain this all, it really doesn't matter.

"Shave and a haircut......"
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/02/2005 :  1:44:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
That's ok, Frost. No need for Stormie to waste words trying to explain this all, it really doesn't matter.

"Shave and a haircut......"
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  12:31:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Bits are a huge topic and unless a person is really into it it's hard to remember it all. The basics are that hard but the catalogs and different makers make it seem a lot harder because of the name changes.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  12:31:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Bits are a huge topic and unless a person is really into it it's hard to remember it all. The basics are that hard but the catalogs and different makers make it seem a lot harder because of the name changes.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  02:23:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
"The basics are that hard....... " ?
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  02:23:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
"The basics are that hard....... " ?
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  06:49:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Bottom line for bits.
If the horse is comfortable with the bit, ie carries it naturally, with not a lot of chewing and bit floppping, and you get the response and control you require it's okay to use.

Over the years we have used many different bits and each horse has it's preference and bits are assigned to the horse. Common ( Horse?)sense applies in whether they are too severe or unacceptable in the ring. Try not to follow the Fads and listen to your horse.

Get some advice from an experienced person whose horse seems to work the way you would like your horse to work.

There are as many bits out there as there are opinions about their use and function. The variations have created an industry and a whole bevy of " experts"

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  06:49:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Bottom line for bits.
If the horse is comfortable with the bit, ie carries it naturally, with not a lot of chewing and bit floppping, and you get the response and control you require it's okay to use.

Over the years we have used many different bits and each horse has it's preference and bits are assigned to the horse. Common ( Horse?)sense applies in whether they are too severe or unacceptable in the ring. Try not to follow the Fads and listen to your horse.

Get some advice from an experienced person whose horse seems to work the way you would like your horse to work.

There are as many bits out there as there are opinions about their use and function. The variations have created an industry and a whole bevy of " experts"

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  08:39:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
Thanks Ed, excellent advice.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  08:39:28 AM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
Thanks Ed, excellent advice.
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Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  10:05:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
I thought this was unusual. This is a copy/pasted from the Equine Definitions at the top of the page at this particular thread. (they change!) However, this is what WAS put up at the time I looked:

Curb Bit: Mouthpiece fitted with cheeks and a chain lying in the chin groove, operating on the principle of levers on the lower jaw. Usually used with a snaffle.
Put Equine Definitions on your website

Wierd huh? With a Snaffle?

I don't think Stomie was saying the basics are "hard" I think what she was going to post is: "The basics aren't that hard but..." My spelling and words can come out different than what I mean them to at times as I tend to type fsater than my mind is thinking. *S*

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
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Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  10:05:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
I thought this was unusual. This is a copy/pasted from the Equine Definitions at the top of the page at this particular thread. (they change!) However, this is what WAS put up at the time I looked:

Curb Bit: Mouthpiece fitted with cheeks and a chain lying in the chin groove, operating on the principle of levers on the lower jaw. Usually used with a snaffle.
Put Equine Definitions on your website

Wierd huh? With a Snaffle?

I don't think Stomie was saying the basics are "hard" I think what she was going to post is: "The basics aren't that hard but..." My spelling and words can come out different than what I mean them to at times as I tend to type fsater than my mind is thinking. *S*

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  1:07:18 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Frost; I think that definition of a curb bit is an English variation. In most English riding circles, a curb is usually a part of a double bridle... 2 bits and 2 sets of reins. One bit is a curb bit and the other is a snaffle with one set of reins to activate the snaffle and the other set for the curb. I'm sure this is what that particular definition is referring too.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/03/2005 :  1:07:18 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Frost; I think that definition of a curb bit is an English variation. In most English riding circles, a curb is usually a part of a double bridle... 2 bits and 2 sets of reins. One bit is a curb bit and the other is a snaffle with one set of reins to activate the snaffle and the other set for the curb. I'm sure this is what that particular definition is referring too.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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naddya819
Beginning Rider



USA
89 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  8:52:46 PM  Show Profile  Visit naddya819's Homepage Send naddya819 a Private Message
Okay, with all the talk about bits, the lightbulb went on. Then almost immediately went out once you started in on some bits that can be either or. Okay, here's a specific question. I have a Reining horse 3 piece snaffle with copper roller. Can this be used as a snaffle OR a curb? In other words, it has 3 rings, the mouthpiece attached about one inch from where the headstall attaches, and another ring down on the shanks. Could I attach the headstall as normal, then put my reins onto the rings at the mouthpiece and use it without the leverage? And at that point, I would not need to use a curb strap?

Live long, laugh hard, love horses.

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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  9:40:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Nope it's still a Curb bit. It uses leverage even with the reins in the top rein rings. It's it isn't much but it is there so it is not a snaffle and should not be used as a snaffle. Yes you need the curb strap to make it work right.

If you mean either or for snaffles and curb, no there isn't. It's either a snaffle(non leverage, direct pressure, headstall, reins and mouth piece attach on the same level) or a Curb bit(has shanks, works on leverage, indriect bit). Shanks cause curb pressure so if it has shanks(and doesn't fall into another group) it's a Curb. Other groups are combos, pelhams and gags although some gags and all pelhams are curbs also.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  9:46:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Forgot to add that yes you can use it with the reins in the top rings or bottom or two sets of reins, one in each. In the top you have some leverage action still and normally the sliding action of the rein on the ring which acts as a longer presignal.
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naddya819
Beginning Rider



USA
89 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  9:51:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit naddya819's Homepage Send naddya819 a Private Message
I've never seen a bit like this, and bought it because the man I bought Caeser from said it's what he was ridden in. I'm just going to take him back to a full cheek snaffle and start teaching him to be lighter to the bit.

Live long, laugh hard, love horses.

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