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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  06:55:44 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
EZ, are the circling touches on hindquarters and tail head, flexing tail, etc. you mentioned in that same book we're talking about, or several volumes before it? TJ has written a ton of books and it sounds like you really accumulated quite a library. If in the same one, then definitely I'll get a copy because that's an intriguing notion.

Re the other, I don't know that she won't pin her ears again, it seems we establish these things from time to time over again. I didn't sock her at all hard enough I don't think, so it made a big impression, but if she does it again then maybe I'll make it a little more of an impression. I'm not sure she had any clue what that was all about. UNLESS ear pinning is a purposeful, conscious motion meant to communicate, then I'd assume she knew exactly what I was talking about. A nip or a threat to kick, no question. That's overt. But ear pinning, it could just be a manifestation of an emotion, I've never seen that defined either way.


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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  06:55:44 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
EZ, are the circling touches on hindquarters and tail head, flexing tail, etc. you mentioned in that same book we're talking about, or several volumes before it? TJ has written a ton of books and it sounds like you really accumulated quite a library. If in the same one, then definitely I'll get a copy because that's an intriguing notion.

Re the other, I don't know that she won't pin her ears again, it seems we establish these things from time to time over again. I didn't sock her at all hard enough I don't think, so it made a big impression, but if she does it again then maybe I'll make it a little more of an impression. I'm not sure she had any clue what that was all about. UNLESS ear pinning is a purposeful, conscious motion meant to communicate, then I'd assume she knew exactly what I was talking about. A nip or a threat to kick, no question. That's overt. But ear pinning, it could just be a manifestation of an emotion, I've never seen that defined either way.


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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  09:46:36 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
The ears are an important part of the way horses communicate with each other in combination with body posture. It's very similar to how us humans use body language. With practice, you can usually tell what kind of mood someone is in long before you approach and talk to them. In time, you can do that with horses.

It's a little harder since you only have one, but if you ever have some free time on your hands and some place where you can watch 2, 3, 4, or more horses interact with each other out in the open, I highly recommend it. If you study them closely, you can see all kinds of body language when they are "talking" to each other. Some of these moves are very supptle and some are glaringly obvious, but it's worth the time to study and learn more about equine communication this way.

Don't kid yourself about Cloud not knowing what that slap was for. You did it right when she was doing unacceptable behavior, and her attitude changed. Yes... she knew all right. Punishment doesn't always have to hurt. In a herd situation, the alpha horse will lunge at one lower in the pecking order if he's out of line if he's doing something out of line. 9 times out of 10, the alpha horse won't even touch the trouble maker, but the communication is crystal clear to the horse on the receiving end, and he probably won't try that again with the alpha horse. What you did with Cloud was the very same thing. You startled her with something totally unexpected right when she deserved it... just like the alpha horse because you ARE the alpha horse in your herd of 2. She may try a few more times to make sure you meant it, but if you keep along this track, Cloud will get the message.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  09:46:36 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
The ears are an important part of the way horses communicate with each other in combination with body posture. It's very similar to how us humans use body language. With practice, you can usually tell what kind of mood someone is in long before you approach and talk to them. In time, you can do that with horses.

It's a little harder since you only have one, but if you ever have some free time on your hands and some place where you can watch 2, 3, 4, or more horses interact with each other out in the open, I highly recommend it. If you study them closely, you can see all kinds of body language when they are "talking" to each other. Some of these moves are very supptle and some are glaringly obvious, but it's worth the time to study and learn more about equine communication this way.

Don't kid yourself about Cloud not knowing what that slap was for. You did it right when she was doing unacceptable behavior, and her attitude changed. Yes... she knew all right. Punishment doesn't always have to hurt. In a herd situation, the alpha horse will lunge at one lower in the pecking order if he's out of line if he's doing something out of line. 9 times out of 10, the alpha horse won't even touch the trouble maker, but the communication is crystal clear to the horse on the receiving end, and he probably won't try that again with the alpha horse. What you did with Cloud was the very same thing. You startled her with something totally unexpected right when she deserved it... just like the alpha horse because you ARE the alpha horse in your herd of 2. She may try a few more times to make sure you meant it, but if you keep along this track, Cloud will get the message.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  5:21:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by OnTheWay

EZ, are the circling touches on hindquarters and tail head, flexing tail, etc. you mentioned in that same book we're talking about, or several volumes before it? TJ has written a ton of books and it sounds like you really accumulated quite a library. If in the same one, then definitely I'll get a copy because that's an intriguing notion.



Yes, everything I've talked about is in that one book (An Introduction to The Tellington-Jones Equine Awareness Method). I have had two other books by her, but this one, I feel, is the most useful. another one basically covered the same area, and a third book, called something like "Improve Your Horse's Well-being" was interesting, but I so far have not used anything in it.

There are probably other books, too, and I know she has some videos, but haven't seen any of those.

EZ2SPOT
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 12/27/2005 :  5:21:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by OnTheWay

EZ, are the circling touches on hindquarters and tail head, flexing tail, etc. you mentioned in that same book we're talking about, or several volumes before it? TJ has written a ton of books and it sounds like you really accumulated quite a library. If in the same one, then definitely I'll get a copy because that's an intriguing notion.



Yes, everything I've talked about is in that one book (An Introduction to The Tellington-Jones Equine Awareness Method). I have had two other books by her, but this one, I feel, is the most useful. another one basically covered the same area, and a third book, called something like "Improve Your Horse's Well-being" was interesting, but I so far have not used anything in it.

There are probably other books, too, and I know she has some videos, but haven't seen any of those.

EZ2SPOT
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2005 :  01:08:56 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
EZ, thanks much, I will order it
:-)
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2005 :  01:08:56 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
EZ, thanks much, I will order it
:-)
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  5:29:16 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
OTW,
Trust yourself, I think you did good girl!.

Just as a side note.. how about a little poll? OTW said she hit Cloud on the jaw...I've always avoided at all cost hitting a horse anywhere on the head, just because I hate seeing a head shy horse. What do y'all think?

<'\__~
_(( // ====

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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  5:29:16 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
OTW,
Trust yourself, I think you did good girl!.

Just as a side note.. how about a little poll? OTW said she hit Cloud on the jaw...I've always avoided at all cost hitting a horse anywhere on the head, just because I hate seeing a head shy horse. What do y'all think?

<'\__~
_(( // ====

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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  7:44:30 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I have slapped my horses with an open palm on the side of the jaw/muzzle area just hard enough to startle them when they have tried to bite or nip me. I do not make a habit of it and haven't had to do it in years. I don't believe there is anything wrong in doing it as I have and my horses are not the least bit head shy. JMO

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  7:44:30 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I have slapped my horses with an open palm on the side of the jaw/muzzle area just hard enough to startle them when they have tried to bite or nip me. I do not make a habit of it and haven't had to do it in years. I don't believe there is anything wrong in doing it as I have and my horses are not the least bit head shy. JMO

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  8:17:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
I agree with RH; I have slapped my horses in the face when necessary (such as when they have nipped, etc.), and they are not head-shy. They realized they were being punished, and knew what for.

If someone went around just randomly hitting a horse on the head, the results would be quite different. The horse would have no idea why it happened, and would probably become quite wary of anyone's hand coming toward its face.

EZ2SPOT
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  8:17:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
I agree with RH; I have slapped my horses in the face when necessary (such as when they have nipped, etc.), and they are not head-shy. They realized they were being punished, and knew what for.

If someone went around just randomly hitting a horse on the head, the results would be quite different. The horse would have no idea why it happened, and would probably become quite wary of anyone's hand coming toward its face.

EZ2SPOT
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