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mtn rider
Trainer



Canada
634 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  11:19:46 AM  Show Profile Send mtn rider a Private Message
Love all the input on the coleman "hot water on demand" as I have been thinking of getting on eventually.

OTW, my cots cost me $3 and $4, got them at garage sales. To bad you arent closer, I would just give them to you!
Even my cooler was a $3 "sale find".

Now with this new trailer, we decided to switch it to 2--deep cycle 6 volts as opposed to 1-12 volt. So much for saving money!LOL Man those are expensive.

Have you thought of taking an old alarm clock, and writing the 24 hr numbers on it, then setting it to PST? Just a thought, hate to hear you missing out on deals!

Ride safe, return safe.

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  08:35:13 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Mtn-- I've bought the Pro-Cat heater and a Zareba battery powered electric fence energizer for temporary corral when horse camping. Cloud is fine at home with just the white tape (charger isn't even on!) But with other horses within eyeshot/earshot, I think having the tape powered will be a lot safer. Only thing left is a cot setup and hot water heater. I've thought long and hard about the hot water since it's in the convenience category much more than the necessity category. (Can boil a pot of water to mix with cold and that goes a long way.) HOWEVER, picturing... I make bacon and eggs when camping. Grease. Running hot water would be a big convenience and time saver. Showers if no bath house: Necessity. Getting hot water when you just don't have time to set up stove or screw around with heating water or dealing with pans. Major convenience. Bathing inside the trailer... major convenience bordering on necessity because of space limitations (hassle, major hassle to mess with big pot of hot water in a tight space). But also, we lose power in storms. No running water at all let alone no furnace to heat it. Bathing dog in yard instead of bathtub. (Hard to do with a blind boxer who's strong.) And rinsing off horse when icy cold water strait out of tap wouldn't be pleasant.

Looking like it would definitely be worth buying.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  08:38:30 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Mtn, no I hadn't thought of the alarm clock, rather dumb not to have, that's a good idea. It was a good auction I missed, although that's always easy to say, I have no idea what the high bidder's proxy (top bid) was, probably a lot more than he got it for. It had all the accessories.

Whenever missing an auction on eBay and kicking self, it's important to remember that because the likelihood you could have ever bought the thing for a dollar over the final bid is not high.

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  2:52:07 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Anyone looking for Coleman Hot Water On Demand propane-powered hot water heater (Flooper's favorite camping toy I think, yes?) -- Country Supply has them at best price anywhere and I've been all over the internet.

NOTE: If you call them, ask if you can get the email-special 10% off which ends tomorrow. They may allow it. Free expedited shipping, the accessories are also cheapest price I've seen. Just bought the water heater, shower adapter and carry bag for total of $187.39 less 18.74 (10%) and free shipping EXCEPT that some items have FOB added shipping charge, which this does, which eats up your 10% off if you're in my zone. But the price is still excellent.

So Flooper there's the 2nd thing I bought on your say so and if I don't love it, YOU WILL PAY DEARLY! LOL. Only kidding, thanks for the reference, looks like the best unit out there and I HAVE researched the competition. No comparison.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  12:02:08 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
CALLING ALL FLOOPER, CALLING ALL FLOOPER...

My Hot Water on Demand unit arrived. This is not a small unit, lol!!! Sheesh, it's a serious piece of equipment. Looks incredibly sturdy and well made though, and also a great design. One question. I charged the battery today and tomorrow I want to try it out. Instructions warn not to use it indoors. Is that just because theoretically no propane unit should be used indoors or is there something more dangerous about this one? When we have power outages I use my Coleman propane stove right on the kitchen counter and we ain't daid yet. Should I consider this unit different, or can I experiment with it a little in the kitchen? It's pretty cold outside to do otherwise and enjoy it much. I'd like to try it out tho. Your opinion?
Carol
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  09:43:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by FLOOPER

OTW,
One other thing...the unit IS kind of bulky...so make sure you have room for it in your trailer, etc.


OTW,

Yep...it is pretty big....as I mentioned a few posts back! I personally would not fire it up inside...it puts out a lot of exhaust...but probably no more than a camp stove, so if you've tried that, I guess it would be fine for just a few minutes or so. But if it were me, I'd go ahead and go outside...plus it's cool to see the steam coming off the water when it's cold outside!! Congrats...being the Gadget Queen, I'll bet you'll find lots of uses for it. They are built well...I've been very happy with mine.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  10:12:21 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Thanks Flooper, I will heed your advice. I don't know anything about "exhaust," the times I've used my propane coleman stove for cooking during power outages, it's seemed fine, but this may be different. It's hard to differentiate "WARNING" messages on instruction manuals between what they include just for liability general purposes OR what they include because it's a serious thing. I would be planning to use this INSIDE my trailer for showers, didn't you say you do that also? There are one-inch cracks between doors and sides so I would think that is ventilation enough, but maybe not. Please clarify how you use it inside your trailer.
Thanks,
Carol
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  11:10:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
OTW,

I used mine with my 2H bumper pull with the back doors open and the unit sitting near the rear edge...so plenty of ventilation. My new trailer has open stock sides, so also will have plenty of ventilation. I will set the unit inside the trailer, but outside the shower curtain, and just have the shower head inside the curtain area...so will be plenty of ventilation. You probably won't take a shower much longer than 5 minutes, and most trailers aren't that "air tight", so I don't see a problem. I suppose if you stood in an airtight trailer with the thing running for half an hour, you might run into some trouble...but like I said, 5 minutes in a trailer with open doors/windows, etc., shouldn't be any big deal...wasnt' for me. You could also just set the unit outside the trailer, have someone turn it on if you can't reach it, and just run your shower hose inside. But I think just leave a door or two open and you should be just fine.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  07:02:19 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Flooper, that's what I was thinking. I'm just wondering though, what the difference is between THAT propane unit and the ProCat heater (which doesn't have the same level of warnings). The water heater had several warnings, do not use inside, do not use inside. The heater says use inside but have ventilation. Both use propane. I don't understand why one propane-operated thing would be more dangerous than any other.

By the way, the ProCat arrived night before last. I still haven't powered up either of them yet, but hope to find time today. Now that is a neat unit! Again bigger than I thought, but it would have to be. Very lightweight, surprisingly! Nice big heater head, looks like it will warm up my trailer pretty fast!

Re the water heater, I agree. I'll just set the thing by one of the human doors, outside the shower curtain, and move my shower place (planned for back of trailer) toward the front, because that hose is only 4 ft. long. Should be fine.

Still curious why THAT particular propane-operated unit has all the warnings and others don't.
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  2:16:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
OTW,

The ProCat is a catalytic heater...there is no actual flame...it uses a chemical reaction inside the fibers of the platinum pad instead of a flame, thus producing insignificant amounts of carbon monoxide, so thus can be used indoors with small amount of ventilation to draw in fresh air. The hot water heater, on the other hand, uses an actual flame to heat the water, and produces lots of carbon monoxide.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 03/09/2006 :  6:41:49 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
A-hah! Okay, I see what you're saying. Well, I still use my Coleman 2-burner camp stove in power outages. That usually happens in winter when it's cold and a snow storm. House is locked up tight. However, it's impossible to lock up a 300-year-old house very tight. I can tell you that from putting my hand ANYWHERE near a windowsill. Or around the edges of any outside door. So there's ventilation. But will still play it safe. Maybe the flame is closer to the propane bottle. (Ouch!)

Didn't fire it up today again. I think it'll be weekend before I get around to it. Actually dying to see them both work. Looks like good recomendations Flooper, again thanks! ;-)

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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2006 :  05:29:13 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by OnTheWay

A-hah! Okay, I see what you're saying. Well, I still use my Coleman 2-burner camp stove in power outages. That usually happens in winter when it's cold and a snow storm. House is locked up tight. However, it's impossible to lock up a 300-year-old house very tight. I can tell you that from putting my hand ANYWHERE near a windowsill. Or around the edges of any outside door. So there's ventilation. But will still play it safe. Maybe the flame is closer to the propane bottle. (Ouch!)

Didn't fire it up today again. I think it'll be weekend before I get around to it. Actually dying to see them both work. Looks like good recomendations Flooper, again thanks! ;-)



I think you should get a carbon monoxide (CO2) monitor and put it in you kitchen or where ever you are using the gas fired appliance. CO2 cannot be detected by our own senses. It is a silent killer. I would never recommend the use of the two burner or any other gas burning appliance indoors. (properly designed and UL approved for indoor use excepted) Just for fun try a google search for carbon monoxide.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 03/10/2006 :  06:21:23 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Okay, Hook, advice well received. I so rarely use it in the kitchen, but have done it for 18 years whenever there's a power outage (once a whole week-long one). The longest it is on in a power outage is to heat a big pot of water for dish washing or bathing. Everything else I cook during those times is shorter time on the stove. The kitchen is really large with three doors leading to other rooms that are open, so I never gave it much thought. I will from now on!
Carol
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