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 Help with bit selection, please
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WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  3:43:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
sorry yes I meant curb hehe

Thanks so much for the great response. She has really come a long way. She is now 8 years old and i have owned her from 5. She used to be scared of her head being touched now she just loves to be hugged and have her eyes pat.

Thanks, that must be the problem with the curb, around the poll area. I know I will take alot of patience. Thats ok, well stick to small shows where to rules are bendable hehe! Ill just comtinue hopefully to regain it.

What I forgot to mention, all horses when they reach a certain stage or training are ready for a bridle. Such as a curb. Snaffles are for young horses, so she will eventually need to be put in a bridle. I dont know if its the same over there but I know here, if someone sees your horse in a snaffle and hes overage they assume he isnt broke!

Thanks again.
WhistleGrinAndRide

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
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Phoodforhorses
Beginning Rider



Canada
83 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  4:12:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Phoodforhorses's Homepage Send Phoodforhorses a Private Message
I think you've had lots of great advice on bits and bridles. The only thing I would add is that it really depends on what you intend to use the horse for.

I used to ride English (dressage) and for most intents and purposes we rode in some form of a snaffle bit. These bits are good for asking a horse to bend laterally (nose towards hip and through the barrel). They are the least severe. We when advanced to the higher levels in dressage we used a double bridle. A bridle with two bits and two sets of reins. One set of reins controlled the snaffle bit and the other controlled the curb. The curb was used here to get the horse to bend more from the poll (sort of looks like tucking in the chin so that the poll is the highest part of the head).

Unless you intend to show I would always suggest using the least severe type of bit (a snaffle). Hackamores and bosals are great too provided you know how to fit them properly and get instruction on using them.

Good luck with your new horse and I too wish somebody would give me a horse.
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Phoodforhorses
Beginning Rider



Canada
83 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  4:12:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Phoodforhorses's Homepage Send Phoodforhorses a Private Message
I think you've had lots of great advice on bits and bridles. The only thing I would add is that it really depends on what you intend to use the horse for.

I used to ride English (dressage) and for most intents and purposes we rode in some form of a snaffle bit. These bits are good for asking a horse to bend laterally (nose towards hip and through the barrel). They are the least severe. We when advanced to the higher levels in dressage we used a double bridle. A bridle with two bits and two sets of reins. One set of reins controlled the snaffle bit and the other controlled the curb. The curb was used here to get the horse to bend more from the poll (sort of looks like tucking in the chin so that the poll is the highest part of the head).

Unless you intend to show I would always suggest using the least severe type of bit (a snaffle). Hackamores and bosals are great too provided you know how to fit them properly and get instruction on using them.

Good luck with your new horse and I too wish somebody would give me a horse.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2005 :  1:21:10 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Great advice Phood .

I just want to add that John Lyons rides all his horses in a full cheek snaffle including his 20+ year old stallion Bright Zip. I'm with Phood when it comes to bits on horses. Unless it's against the rules for showing or competing, I'd go with the mildest bit my horse will work well in. If that happens to be a snaffle, then I would never change it. Other people don't know your horse or the details on how you ride. I wouldn't let them bother me and ride my horse in the equipment that works best for that particular horse.

Just my honest opinion .
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/27/2005 :  1:21:10 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Great advice Phood .

I just want to add that John Lyons rides all his horses in a full cheek snaffle including his 20+ year old stallion Bright Zip. I'm with Phood when it comes to bits on horses. Unless it's against the rules for showing or competing, I'd go with the mildest bit my horse will work well in. If that happens to be a snaffle, then I would never change it. Other people don't know your horse or the details on how you ride. I wouldn't let them bother me and ride my horse in the equipment that works best for that particular horse.

Just my honest opinion .
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 08/28/2005 :  5:36:43 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
WGAR,

Just curious, where are you from? I think we may be having trouble with your question because in the US riding a horse with a "bridle" can mean a snaffle too. And here, correct me if I'm wrong all you trainers!.., most of us start a horse in a snaffle, move to curb or correction bit for training...but once the training is done, the aim to get a horse back to a snaffle. When I see a five or six year old horse in a bridle with a snaffle I assume they are dead broke and well trained. I'd say 90% of the really nice horses I know are ridden in a bridle with a very mild snaffle. In fact I'd be suspicious of a supposedly "fully trained" horse in a curb bit ....

Shelly
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 08/28/2005 :  5:36:43 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
WGAR,

Just curious, where are you from? I think we may be having trouble with your question because in the US riding a horse with a "bridle" can mean a snaffle too. And here, correct me if I'm wrong all you trainers!.., most of us start a horse in a snaffle, move to curb or correction bit for training...but once the training is done, the aim to get a horse back to a snaffle. When I see a five or six year old horse in a bridle with a snaffle I assume they are dead broke and well trained. I'd say 90% of the really nice horses I know are ridden in a bridle with a very mild snaffle. In fact I'd be suspicious of a supposedly "fully trained" horse in a curb bit ....

Shelly
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2005 :  3:22:41 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by sbower

WGAR,

Just curious, where are you from? I think we may be having trouble with your question because in the US riding a horse with a "bridle" can mean a snaffle too. And here, correct me if I'm wrong all you trainers!.., most of us start a horse in a snaffle, move to curb or correction bit for training...but once the training is done, the aim to get a horse back to a snaffle. When I see a five or six year old horse in a bridle with a snaffle I assume they are dead broke and well trained. I'd say 90% of the really nice horses I know are ridden in a bridle with a very mild snaffle. In fact I'd be suspicious of a supposedly "fully trained" horse in a curb bit ....

Shelly



I'm smiling, Shelly. Dove goes best in a curb when being ridden with one hand in a western saddle without hardly taking the slack out of the reins, but he goes beautifully in a D-ring snaffle when being ridden hunt seat, a half-cheek snaffle when I drive him, and many is the time I have trail ridden him with a mechanical hackamore(I rarely, if ever, take the slack out of the reins when I trail ride him in a hackamore, but I like to think Dove likes not having a bit in his mouth on occassion . When he's wearing his hackamore, it's more like an awkward halter than a bridle.). And this is the horse that I put first time students and small children on for riding lessons !

So, to me at least, unless the horse is in a very severe bit and the rider is practically sawing his mouth in two with the reins, I'd say you cannot tell how well broke a horse is by what kind of bit they are being ridden with. JMHO
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/29/2005 :  3:22:41 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by sbower

WGAR,

Just curious, where are you from? I think we may be having trouble with your question because in the US riding a horse with a "bridle" can mean a snaffle too. And here, correct me if I'm wrong all you trainers!.., most of us start a horse in a snaffle, move to curb or correction bit for training...but once the training is done, the aim to get a horse back to a snaffle. When I see a five or six year old horse in a bridle with a snaffle I assume they are dead broke and well trained. I'd say 90% of the really nice horses I know are ridden in a bridle with a very mild snaffle. In fact I'd be suspicious of a supposedly "fully trained" horse in a curb bit ....

Shelly



I'm smiling, Shelly. Dove goes best in a curb when being ridden with one hand in a western saddle without hardly taking the slack out of the reins, but he goes beautifully in a D-ring snaffle when being ridden hunt seat, a half-cheek snaffle when I drive him, and many is the time I have trail ridden him with a mechanical hackamore(I rarely, if ever, take the slack out of the reins when I trail ride him in a hackamore, but I like to think Dove likes not having a bit in his mouth on occassion . When he's wearing his hackamore, it's more like an awkward halter than a bridle.). And this is the horse that I put first time students and small children on for riding lessons !

So, to me at least, unless the horse is in a very severe bit and the rider is practically sawing his mouth in two with the reins, I'd say you cannot tell how well broke a horse is by what kind of bit they are being ridden with. JMHO
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WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2005 :  7:31:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
im from canada. it isnt my opinon on the broke concept.. but its what some think..some people have no sense.

It is the rules that a horse over 6 needs to be in a bridle for showing.. my mare works fabulously in a snaffle, but I can't change the rules. Here we call it a bridle horse, or finished horse. A horse wont get hard in a bridle if your hands are soft. if you just come in with your legs you won't even have to touch his face.

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
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WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 09/11/2005 :  7:31:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
im from canada. it isnt my opinon on the broke concept.. but its what some think..some people have no sense.

It is the rules that a horse over 6 needs to be in a bridle for showing.. my mare works fabulously in a snaffle, but I can't change the rules. Here we call it a bridle horse, or finished horse. A horse wont get hard in a bridle if your hands are soft. if you just come in with your legs you won't even have to touch his face.

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
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naddya819
Beginning Rider



USA
89 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  10:33:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit naddya819's Homepage Send naddya819 a Private Message
And here I am, putting my 21 year old gelding back into a snaffle. To be honest, I don't think he's had really good training even though he was a team roper. I think he was "broken" the old way, you know, throw the stuff on and ride out the buck. He's done a lot of head pitching and tossing with either the TT (and I know never to use that again after reading these posts) and the Argentine snaffle/reiner's bit. I plan to put him back into the full cheek snaffle, which I sized the bridle for him this afternoon, and start teaching him how to better give to the pressure, John Lyons-i.e. natural horsemanship-style.

Live long, laugh hard, love horses.

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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/12/2006 :  10:39:07 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
naddy,

Has your gelding had his teeth floated recently?

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~

Edited by - PaintGal on 02/13/2006 08:16:35 AM
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naddya819
Beginning Rider



USA
89 Posts

Posted - 02/13/2006 :  4:32:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit naddya819's Homepage Send naddya819 a Private Message
No, he's not been floated recently, but he's been checked by the vet. He doesn't drop food or appear to have problems chewing his food, and he did work nicely off the full cheek snaffle today. I just think the TT was sending too many mixed messages and his way of telling me he didn't understand was to toss his head. He injured himself coming into the stall today, up on the left hip, and it's scraped and cut pretty badly, so I guess it will be a while before we do much riding. I'll just have to keep up with some ground work.

Live long, laugh hard, love horses.

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