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Suzi-Qu Appelle OK EZ
Tenderfoot

1 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2006 :  4:38:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Suzi-Qu Appelle OK EZ's Homepage Send Suzi-Qu Appelle OK EZ a Private Message
Hi- I have a training question--I have a 2yr old TB, she has had 30 days on her and currently i am using a o-ring snaffle bit. I am having problems to get her to keep her head down when we canter, she does alright at the walk and trot, so I was wondering if there is a bit that might be more effective in controlling her head set?

Theresa
Suzi-Q
Qu" Appelle OK EZ

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/05/2006 :  7:07:03 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Hi Suzi, and welcome to.

Your problem sounds very similar to the one we've been discussing under the topic "Bit Contact".

Basically, it sounds like your mare needs more work from the ground and at the slower gaits to learn to give and flex to bit pressure. From what little you have said, she hasn't quite figured out that when you apply rein pressure to give to that pressure and tuck her head. This must be accomplished from the ground, first, and then at a stand still with you in the saddle, before trying it at a walk, a trot, and then at the canter. Like, I've said, we've discussed this fairly thoroughly under "Bit Contact". Take a look, and let us know what you think.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown

Edited by - Red Hawk on 02/05/2006 7:08:09 PM
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2006 :  01:22:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Also she is young, very young and with only 30 days she hasn't had enough time to gain her balance. 2 yr olds you have to be very, very careful with. Too much work or too fast of work can cause major joint problems. It can also lead to training problems. Try slowing down and avoid the canter for now. Work on the giving to the bit but also do things to help with her balance. When she can balance correctly and has the muscle to carry you she will find it easier to carry her head correctly. No bit is going to give you a head set until the horse is trained for it. Also it is not a head set that you want but a whole body frame. The headset comes naturally after the horse has the muscle and balance to carry himself and a rider correctly. If you focus too much on where the head is and fuss with it you will end up with headset problems later on.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2006 :  11:25:45 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I agree 100% with Stormie on this, and after I made my first post, I began to think that the entire horse must change to get a good head position. I do know the first couple of times I've asked for a canter on a young or green trained horse that the head usually does come up. This is because they don't know how to balance the weight of the rider, just like Stormie is saying. They are not used to it and the muscles are not developed enough for the faster gaits.

A 2 year old shouldn't be worked more than 15 or 30 minutes at a time, and must never be rushed into anything that can damage her bones that are still soft and growing or her muscles, tendons, or ligaments that haven't had time to mature for accepting more physical work. I don't do any more than 10 or 15 minutes on a horse this young, and I keep it slow, soft, and relaxed.

Also, a TB usually matures late, which means they have to be taken slower than most other breeds. I doubt if she'll reach maturity until she 7 or 8 years old. If she was my horse, I'd spend more time suppling her and getting her to flex and give her body from the ground than actually riding her. A few short minutes in the saddle maybe once a day should be plenty for right now. JMHO

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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