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 The Beginning Rider
 how can you tell if a horse is broke?
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countryside_wave
Groomer



USA
40 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  01:18:52 AM  Show Profile  Visit countryside_wave's Homepage Send countryside_wave a Private Message
Can you tell if a horse is broke by looking at it? Are there ways to figure that out with out riding it?

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  09:28:38 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
countryside_wave Posted - 09/17/2005 : 01:18:52
quote:
Can you tell if a horse is broke by looking at it?


I guess you could look for girth marks or perhaps saddle sores. That's just going to tell you if the horse has been ridden but not how well the horse is trained.

quote:
Are there ways to figure that out with out riding it?


You might get an idea of how much work a horse has had by doing some ground work with it but until that saddle is on his back and someone is in the saddle, I don't think you can be sure he is ridable. Some horses will let you do anything with them on the ground, but become different horses with a rider.

Why are you asking?

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  09:28:38 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
countryside_wave Posted - 09/17/2005 : 01:18:52
quote:
Can you tell if a horse is broke by looking at it?


I guess you could look for girth marks or perhaps saddle sores. That's just going to tell you if the horse has been ridden but not how well the horse is trained.

quote:
Are there ways to figure that out with out riding it?


You might get an idea of how much work a horse has had by doing some ground work with it but until that saddle is on his back and someone is in the saddle, I don't think you can be sure he is ridable. Some horses will let you do anything with them on the ground, but become different horses with a rider.

Why are you asking?

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  11:10:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
From my own personal experience and reading forum on other's experiences on horse searches, trials, I would say....NOPE.

Even if good ground manners, could be a rodeo in the saddle. (Personal experience!) And rider ability.....broke can mean different things to people....would never take sellers word..
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  11:10:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
From my own personal experience and reading forum on other's experiences on horse searches, trials, I would say....NOPE.

Even if good ground manners, could be a rodeo in the saddle. (Personal experience!) And rider ability.....broke can mean different things to people....would never take sellers word..
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  3:39:47 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
My cousin had a gelding that was an ex-rodeo bronc. A 3 year old child could've been perfectly safe with this horse on the ground, but the first foot that went into the stirrup and it was lift off time ! This horse had to be bucked out every time he was saddled. Then, and only then, could anyone even begin to ride him.

If you want to know if a horse you are considering for purchase is broke to ride and you don't trust the seller to give you an honest answer, I'd ask to see the horse saddled, bridled, and ridden right then & there. If the seller refuses to do any of these things for whatever reason, I'd walk away and not look back. This is even more important if you are new to horses or a beginning rider. I'd also have a pre-purchase exam done to make sure the horse hasn't been drugged so he was rideable when you were there to try him out.

So, to answer your question, I'd say a definite no. There is really no way to tell if a horse is broke to ride until you swing that first leg over his back and see what he'll do.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  3:39:47 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
My cousin had a gelding that was an ex-rodeo bronc. A 3 year old child could've been perfectly safe with this horse on the ground, but the first foot that went into the stirrup and it was lift off time ! This horse had to be bucked out every time he was saddled. Then, and only then, could anyone even begin to ride him.

If you want to know if a horse you are considering for purchase is broke to ride and you don't trust the seller to give you an honest answer, I'd ask to see the horse saddled, bridled, and ridden right then & there. If the seller refuses to do any of these things for whatever reason, I'd walk away and not look back. This is even more important if you are new to horses or a beginning rider. I'd also have a pre-purchase exam done to make sure the horse hasn't been drugged so he was rideable when you were there to try him out.

So, to answer your question, I'd say a definite no. There is really no way to tell if a horse is broke to ride until you swing that first leg over his back and see what he'll do.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning
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Phoodforhorses
Beginning Rider



Canada
83 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  3:47:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Phoodforhorses's Homepage Send Phoodforhorses a Private Message
I remember when I was young (17) and looking for free horses to ride. I found one guy who had this gorgeous mare that he said used to be his wife's horse. She passed away the year before and he didn't want to sell the horse even though he didn't ride himself. This horse let me do everything from the ground (brush, pick hooves, saddle, bridle) with no cares whatsoever.

Then I got up on her back and ooooh boooy!!! Yeee Haw! We had the ride of our lives. (Or at least I did!) Even though it only lasted about 10 seconds.

I had anticipated some problems with her being fresh or forgetting what it was like to carry a rider so I had the owner lead her the first few steps! But it didn't matter. OUCH! That ground was hard. Good thing she didn't step on my glasses when she galloped off!

Later the owner told me that this mare was always a little hot but his wife liked her that way. Hmmm, maybe I didn't ask enough questions first.

Lesson learned. I'll never get on a horse again without seeing the owner do it first.
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Phoodforhorses
Beginning Rider



Canada
83 Posts

Posted - 09/17/2005 :  3:47:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Phoodforhorses's Homepage Send Phoodforhorses a Private Message
I remember when I was young (17) and looking for free horses to ride. I found one guy who had this gorgeous mare that he said used to be his wife's horse. She passed away the year before and he didn't want to sell the horse even though he didn't ride himself. This horse let me do everything from the ground (brush, pick hooves, saddle, bridle) with no cares whatsoever.

Then I got up on her back and ooooh boooy!!! Yeee Haw! We had the ride of our lives. (Or at least I did!) Even though it only lasted about 10 seconds.

I had anticipated some problems with her being fresh or forgetting what it was like to carry a rider so I had the owner lead her the first few steps! But it didn't matter. OUCH! That ground was hard. Good thing she didn't step on my glasses when she galloped off!

Later the owner told me that this mare was always a little hot but his wife liked her that way. Hmmm, maybe I didn't ask enough questions first.

Lesson learned. I'll never get on a horse again without seeing the owner do it first.
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Promise
Tenderfoot



USA
17 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2005 :  06:57:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Promise's Homepage Send Promise a Private Message
Oh! Oh! You could lunge it! With the saddle on that is. Try on alot of saddles, if more are comfy for the horse, it's broke! But very few comfy for the horse, you better get ready for trainin' now!

Sammy
"Do your good better, and your better best, never let it rest, until your better is best!"

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Promise
Tenderfoot



USA
17 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2005 :  06:57:15 AM  Show Profile  Visit Promise's Homepage Send Promise a Private Message
Oh! Oh! You could lunge it! With the saddle on that is. Try on alot of saddles, if more are comfy for the horse, it's broke! But very few comfy for the horse, you better get ready for trainin' now!

Sammy
"Do your good better, and your better best, never let it rest, until your better is best!"

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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2005 :  11:45:12 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Promise

Oh! Oh! You could lunge it! With the saddle on that is. Try on alot of saddles, if more are comfy for the horse, it's broke! But very few comfy for the horse, you better get ready for trainin' now!

Sammy
"Do your good better, and your better best, never let it rest, until your better is best!"





You still won't know if that horse is broke to ride or will accept a rider. I lunge all my youngsters with a bridle & saddle on before they have ever had a rider on their backs. No... lunging will not reveal whether a horse is broke to ride or not. There is no sure fire way to tell if a horse is broke to ride without having someone swing a leg over him & ride him.



"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 10/04/2005 :  11:45:12 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Promise

Oh! Oh! You could lunge it! With the saddle on that is. Try on alot of saddles, if more are comfy for the horse, it's broke! But very few comfy for the horse, you better get ready for trainin' now!

Sammy
"Do your good better, and your better best, never let it rest, until your better is best!"





You still won't know if that horse is broke to ride or will accept a rider. I lunge all my youngsters with a bridle & saddle on before they have ever had a rider on their backs. No... lunging will not reveal whether a horse is broke to ride or not. There is no sure fire way to tell if a horse is broke to ride without having someone swing a leg over him & ride him.



"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning
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Live2dream
Beginning Rider

51 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2005 :  11:48:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Live2dream's Homepage Send Live2dream a Private Message
There is no sure fire way to tell unless you see the horse riden or ride it yourself. If they won't get on the horses back then just assume is not broke and if you still want the horse have a vet check. Secondly, if they are selling teh horse as a riding horse and will not show you that thr horse can be ridden then insist on a lower price because you will be taking the chance that this horse is not broke. Last but not least do not fall for the owner gettin up there and just sitting on the horse no movement involved. I have had a 3 yr old filly that you could saddle,bridle and get on her back easy as pie right from the beginning. Gettin her to moveout at all took a little time though. So as the saying goes buyer beware. If you really wanna know and are worried about it have a trainer be the dummy up(AKA slang for first up). This shouldn't cost much just to get the horse evaluated.
~Ree

~ A good farrier who is reliable,cheap, and good at their job is a mythical creature liken to a unicorn... I have never seen it and probably never will.
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Live2dream
Beginning Rider

51 Posts

Posted - 11/17/2005 :  11:48:29 AM  Show Profile  Visit Live2dream's Homepage Send Live2dream a Private Message
There is no sure fire way to tell unless you see the horse riden or ride it yourself. If they won't get on the horses back then just assume is not broke and if you still want the horse have a vet check. Secondly, if they are selling teh horse as a riding horse and will not show you that thr horse can be ridden then insist on a lower price because you will be taking the chance that this horse is not broke. Last but not least do not fall for the owner gettin up there and just sitting on the horse no movement involved. I have had a 3 yr old filly that you could saddle,bridle and get on her back easy as pie right from the beginning. Gettin her to moveout at all took a little time though. So as the saying goes buyer beware. If you really wanna know and are worried about it have a trainer be the dummy up(AKA slang for first up). This shouldn't cost much just to get the horse evaluated.
~Ree

~ A good farrier who is reliable,cheap, and good at their job is a mythical creature liken to a unicorn... I have never seen it and probably never will.
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jhoward
Tenderfoot

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2005 :  11:14:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit jhoward's Homepage Send jhoward a Private Message
Even if you lunge the heck out of them and still arent sure if they are good with a saddle. After the horse has been saddled before mouning, take the saddle by the horn and push/pull it back and forth on the horses shoulders. If the horse has any intentions of acting up he will show some kind of sign when your are wiggling the saddle, i.e. ears back, biting, humping up, kicking, un-easiness. If a horse is goodn-n-borke he more than likely the movement of the saddle won't even bother him.

Be on alert to recogonize your prime as you never know at what time in your life it may occur.
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jhoward
Tenderfoot

USA
3 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2005 :  11:14:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit jhoward's Homepage Send jhoward a Private Message
Even if you lunge the heck out of them and still arent sure if they are good with a saddle. After the horse has been saddled before mouning, take the saddle by the horn and push/pull it back and forth on the horses shoulders. If the horse has any intentions of acting up he will show some kind of sign when your are wiggling the saddle, i.e. ears back, biting, humping up, kicking, un-easiness. If a horse is goodn-n-borke he more than likely the movement of the saddle won't even bother him.

Be on alert to recogonize your prime as you never know at what time in your life it may occur.
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Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2005 :  11:30:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Well, Live2Dream and jhoward....the "rest of the story" is that countrysidewave (original poster of this topic) was sneaking onto someone else's property and riding their horses...sans saddle, sans bridle, sans common sense, and then bailing off (sans helmet) one of the horses when it ran off with her/him. I also don't believe that csw has returned to this forum since being severely verbally reprimanded for such actions, mostly by me. Maybe do a search of csw's recent posts to find the whole ugly story.

I have a very strong feelings of disgust when dealing with people who do stupid things...maybe I need more chocolate.

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 12/04/2005 :  11:30:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Well, Live2Dream and jhoward....the "rest of the story" is that countrysidewave (original poster of this topic) was sneaking onto someone else's property and riding their horses...sans saddle, sans bridle, sans common sense, and then bailing off (sans helmet) one of the horses when it ran off with her/him. I also don't believe that csw has returned to this forum since being severely verbally reprimanded for such actions, mostly by me. Maybe do a search of csw's recent posts to find the whole ugly story.

I have a very strong feelings of disgust when dealing with people who do stupid things...maybe I need more chocolate.

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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