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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  5:07:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Hi everyone-I just purchased 25 acres in NC some pasture, some woods. Right now there is cattle grazing on the land.My horses will be hauled from NY to NC by Sept. My question is; is there a time frame, if any, that the cattle should be off the land? Does the pasture need to "rest"? Do I need to clean up the cattle droppings?Is there anything I should be wary of about the pasture? Boy do I sound like a city girl or what? I'm really not---just inexperienced.I know my guys will need a coggins test. Is there anything else I need to know? Thanks

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  5:51:47 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
WOW! Congrats!

I think it would depend on how many cattle on are the land & how much it's grazed down. I don't think you'd need to pick up cow pies.

You might want to check with the states you'll be traveling through & with NC to see what documentation you'd need especially if you unload the horses at some point. It might be a good idea to have health certificates just in case anyone asks & keep registration papers if you have them along with the coggins tests handy.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/06/2006 :  5:57:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Lucky you!!! That sounds really wonderful!

Found this on the University of Missouri Extension site:

Grazing cattle with horses

If at all possible, combine cattle and horses to maintain a balance between grasses and legumes. Horses tend to graze in spots -- undergrazing and overgrazing. Cattle will graze the otherwise wasted feed. Cattle droppings are randomly distributed, but horse droppings will be concentrated in specific areas and become "hot houses" for parasites.

If cattle and horses are grazed together, pasture clipping usually is eliminated, and it is easier to control parasites and maintain a balance between grasses and legumes.

Cattle and horses may be grazed together simultaneously or rotated with one following the other. Cattle don't have the same intestinal parasites as horses, nor are horses bothered by cattle parasites. They can graze around each other's droppings without becoming infested.


Hope that helps. One thing I would do is check the pasture for any plants toxic to horses...there are some plants that are fine for cattle, but not for horses.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show

Edited by - FLOOPER on 03/06/2006 6:06:06 PM
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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2006 :  11:45:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Hi-thanks for the info.PaintGal-I'm glad I don't have to go around and pick up "cow pies"! No one knows who's cattle they are (about 24), but they will probably have to leave the land while we build.Flooper- I'm glad there are no parasite issues -that was a big concern for me.

As for toxic plants-here's where I'm going to some need help. Can you tell me what they are -this way I can research on what they look like and how to get rid of them?

I'm going to have a professional hauler bring the horses down. I don't have a trailer or the experience. Heard too many horror stories about accidents on 81 involving trailors. Saw one on the way down-trailor came unhitched and slid down a 3 lane highway on it's side. We were on the other side I totally lost it-horse was inside looking out. No exits on our side to get off and help(what was I going to do?I was hysterically crying) Stopped at the visitors center and had them call police(cell phones don't work too well in the mountains)Thought about that horse all week in NC... and obviously I still am. Anyway that just reaffirmed that we will have a pro do it.
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2006 :  12:05:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Talk to your local county ag extension office. Here is something put out by NC State University that might be a good starting point. You'll find the local county extension office very helpful when it comes to local soils, plants, etc. All the ones I've ever talked to (in Iowa) have really known their stuff!! At bottom of page they have links to the county pages...this one is all about Burke County, I believe.

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/copubs/ag/livestock/horse/002/


I thought the quote below might be of special interest to you, since you metioned you have woods on your land...might want to check for red maple and black cherry trees near your pasture!!!

"In most cases the weeds are unpalatable and will not be grazed unless desirable forages are unavailable. The notable exceptions are black cherry and red maple leaves. These leaves are toxic in even small amounts. Horse will sometimes eat the wilted leaves from a blown down black cherry and a few fallen red maple leaves can easily be picked up when grazing. A few years ago three horses died in Burke County when their owner fed their hay under a red maple during leaf drop."


(Yes, I'm bored today and have nothing else to do...in between projects!!)

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show

Edited by - FLOOPER on 03/07/2006 12:12:30 PM
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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 03/07/2006 :  1:25:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Thanks Flooper- this will keep me busy for a while. I know there are some cedar and white pine, but as for anything else I won't be able to tell until spring.Fortunately the pasture is clear except for some cedar. All the trees and such are where the house will be. Also there are 2 branches that run thru. I've seen the cattle drinking the water, but is that ok for the horses too?
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