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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2006 :  8:01:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
There is an ad in the local paper here that reads:

3 SPANISH mustangs. 1 female, 9 years old, green broke, easy catch, trailers great. 1 female, 1.5 years old, halter broke, leads. 1 male, 10 mos. old. All healthy & sound. All for $1,000. Must sell! Moving out of state.

I am not seriously considering this purchase, but it is fun to dream. I have a lot of free time and could work with them on a daily basis, and IF I did get them, I'd have to figure in the additional cost of Anderson cd's.

Anyway, in researching Mustangs on the net, all I have read is positive. I realize that people will be a little reluctant to mention any negatives about their favorite breed, but I would like to know what traits they have, ie. spook easily, etc. that might make training more challenging/difficult.

Anyone have any experience with this breed?

(I think a DE HAA intervention may be required.)

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 02/26/2006 :  8:57:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Sorry...no interventions til we get the t-shirts!! rofl

Respectfully,
Your Director of Acquisitions

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  05:20:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Saddletramp

Sorry...no interventions til we get the t-shirts!! rofl

Respectfully,
Your Director of Acquisitions



Mustangs, Do they count as horses under DE HAA rules............ YUP. DON'T do it. Horses will take over your life:)

As for the T Shirts, Limited Conceptual Activity so far. I'm workin' on it, I'm workin' on it.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  07:42:37 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I just had a conversation with a friend about Mustangs. Just the thought of wild horses running free is breathtaking and they are symbols of the west so deserve a place in our hearts.

BUT..

They are not selectively bred for anything except for survival in the wild. They're born into a life full of danger and never learn to *think* like we expect our horses to do. Instinct governs their reactions and IMHO can never unlearn the instinctive behaviors and relearn what we feel are appropriate behaviors.

Of course, all horses rely on instincts but a domestic horse has learned to accept humans and human control early on in their life. I feel a domestic horse would be more likely to listen to a rider/handler in a stressful situation than a mustang would. I can't help but think of the mustang that bolted in Shawnee (Illinois) last fall. The rider bailed & received some injuries but the mustang was lost for several days. When found, he was dead with a broken leg.

I know ANY horse could have done the same thing but I think it's less likely for a trained domesticated horse to do so because they don't do it as a means of survival day in & day out. A mustang HAS bolted before, has literally run from real enemies (not horse eating plastic bags) and I think more likely to do it again.

I also realize there are some wonderful mustangs and there's not a tougher horse. Mustangs can & do excel in many disciplines but I wouldn't want to train & trust one. I'm sure glad there are people that do though.




Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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appygirl
Clinician



USA
3211 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  09:36:26 AM  Show Profile Send appygirl a Private Message
But you do have to watch those horse eating baggies not to mention those trail alligators! ;o)

I agree with PG; I have known a couple of folks who have owned/ridden mustangs and each told me that while they were by far the most sure-footed horse they've owned, they were also more prone to get the heck out of Dodge when a flight of fight instance occurred. One thing they both agreed on is that the best mustangs are the younger ones, weanling to 3 years old. Anything older and it was almost impossible to get the 'wild' out of them.

I'm glad there are folks who do adopt them. I would love to out west and see a herd of wild horses; that would be fabulous.


Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  10:36:11 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I think you are all missing the point. The ad said SPANISH mustangs. This is a recognized breed with its own registry and not your BLM Mustang, unless I'm reading it wrong. Remember Texas Jody? She was into the Spanish Mustang.

I agree that I don't believe I'd want a BLM mustang, but they do come from breeding naturally in the wild, meaning those not fit usually end up in some predator's belly and the survivors pass on the hardier traits to the next generation. The end result is a very hardy, extremely sound horse that can take just about anything you care to train them to do.

Also, these horses are used to looking for leadership in the alpha mare in the herd. I'd think once they've learned to respect their owner as the alpha horse, they would make excellent riding horses. Buuuut, one the other hand, I'd be half afraid of your horse not coming back if they got loose anywhere. After all, they were raised to fend for themselves in the wild and wouldn't feel the need of dependency on their human in a situation such as this.

But I still feel the key word here is SPANISH Mustangs... a whole different critter than their BLM counterpart.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Budman
Advanced Rider



USA
230 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  11:16:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit Budman's Homepage Send Budman a Private Message
I love Mustangs, my first one was a 65 rag-top. The new ones are pretty neat too.....

OOPS, wrong forum..

Budman
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  12:29:41 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
LOL Budman!!

RH... yep.. I remember that now.... but I still think what I think about Mustangs.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  12:32:30 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
Thank you all for your input!

Budman, yeah? I dated a guy that had a Mustang like that, what everyone says about Mustangs tending to bolt, must be true. He ran off with the first palamino-haired filly that came along.

I did call on the ad this morning, and I have dodged another bullet. The horses were already sold.

Redhawk: I was wondering too if these really were Spanish Mustangs or BLM. In the short conversation that I had with the owners, I think they were BLM and he just didn't know the diff.

There are usually a lot of mustangs for sale around here, so I really appreciate everyone's thoughts on this.
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Termite
Advanced Rider

369 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:11:06 PM  Show Profile Send Termite a Private Message
There are Spanish mustangs in the BLM areas. Here is a link on them.
http://www.conquistador.com/mustang.html
If I was set up and approved I would have adopted a mustang from the IL. faculity in January. He was a 3 year old gelding and no body bid on him.
Termite
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:12:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
LOL Ree and Budman!

I would imagine they were BLM Mustangs for that price, and would be suspicious ...too cheap!

When I was 17, accidentally rolled into a cherried out Mustang with my parents Plymouth station wagon circa 1968 model....(moving mountain of metal!) while waiting for a stop light....the guy just about had a heart attack!! Foot not on the brake solid and boom! I was thinking about the accident I had just gotten into 20 minutes earlier, backing into a post and how I was going to explain that one to my dad!! Dang Mustangs!!
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arizona77
Tenderfoot

USA
16 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:17:11 PM  Show Profile  Visit arizona77's Homepage Send arizona77 a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

But you do have to watch those horse eating baggies not to mention those trail alligators! ;o)

I agree with PG; I have known a couple of folks who have owned/ridden mustangs and each told me that while they were by far the most sure-footed horse they've owned, they were also more prone to get the heck out of Dodge when a flight of fight instance occurred. One thing they both agreed on is that the best mustangs are the younger ones, weanling to 3 years old. Anything older and it was almost impossible to get the 'wild' out of them.

I'm glad there are folks who do adopt them. I would love to out west and see a herd of wild horses; that would be fabulous.




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arizona77
Tenderfoot

USA
16 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:29:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit arizona77's Homepage Send arizona77 a Private Message
Hello, I'm new to the forum but had to comment on Mustangs. We have 2 Mustangs now, a 5 y/o gelding who was captured at 2 and a Navajo reservation girl that is 6 or 7 y/o.
Where can I start with our gelding, the most awesome ground manners you could ask for, though he is a little spooky from a winter in the pasture, but is very trusting, smart, gentle, takes cues...and he is a rescue that we aquired when his neighbors had seen him suffer for too long, at the hands of a BIG man (and our guy is lony sized)
Our other Mustang is another story, she was badly abused and on the auction block when she was bought. She has taken a while to even get close to her, but once caught, she does what is asked of her, though she is leary of people, especially men.
Mustangs can make wonderful mounts and should not be shyed away from because they are *wild*. Every horse has their own personality and traits, and the trainig should reflect that.
On the bolting and spookiness of Mustangs, that is a training issue not a personality issue IMO.
Please don't discount the Mustangs as a wonderful addition to your family, once you have their trust, it knows no bounds...just like Appalosa's;O)
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:57:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I have owned a mustang mare and worked with a gelding......There is no bred traits on them not even withen the different herds. Each horse is different just like in any breed but the gene pool on them is huge.

The mare I owned was 13.3 hhs. I got her at a sale as a rescue. Under weight, bad feet and training issues. I had a VERY hard time with her weight. Not putting it on her but keeping it off. The owners that have her now had her so fat I was scared she was going to have a heart attack getting off the trailer this spring when she was here!! Her feet aren't really bad just tend to get long toe, low heel so you have to keep after them. She wasn't really spooky but can be a handful if you don't show her that you can and will be boss. Touchy about some things but gets over it when you prove that you aren't going to be letting her get away with it. I posted photos of her on the Conformation section.

The gelding I worked with was at least half draft. HUGE horse around 17 hands, but hard to keep weight on him. That could have been how they cared for him. Spooky, hyper, dumb...yes dumb, kick, bit buck....But I think most of that had to do with how he was handled. I don't know when he was caught but the guy that had him only had him a short time, got him from a questionable horse dealer. I did get him to the point that I could saddle him without getting bit or kicked but the boss still got to be a target everytime. Mainly because the saddle did not fit at all and refused to even try to pad it up like I did.

These two were so different in conformation. Both where BLM but I don't know much on their history with BLM.

I do know other mustangs that have made great horses but I do think that they aren't for just any handler. I think a lot of people fall in the love with the dream of having a mustang and then find out they can't handle it. I think both of the above was the case since neither one had a solid foundation on them. Once tamed down and trained they can be better for more riders but you still have ones that will test you everytime.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:57:54 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
Termite, thanks for the link, interesting reading there. Shame you weren't able to take in the 3 year old.

arizona77, hello and welcome to the forum! Thank you for your story, would love to see pics of your horses.
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arizona77
Tenderfoot

USA
16 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  2:08:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit arizona77's Homepage Send arizona77 a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by ree7

Termite, thanks for the link, interesting reading there. Shame you weren't able to take in the 3 year old.

arizona77, hello and welcome to the forum! Thank you for your story, would love to see pics of your horses.



Thank you for the welcome, Ree7!! It's great to be here and hope to learn from the best!! I have an album started with a few pictures in it if you'd like to see them

http://photobucket.com/albums/f252/arizona77/

They are my life:O)
Loree in AZ
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appygirl
Clinician



USA
3211 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  2:35:06 PM  Show Profile Send appygirl a Private Message
Ree, danged those pretty little palomino ponies! lol]

Arizona, welcome to DE; glad to have you and look forward to hearing more from you. Loved the pics. Do your horses ever have problems with sand colic?


Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  2:55:51 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
FB: yup! those type of Mustangs are nothing but trouble!

arizona77: good looking horses, great pics! thank you.

appygirl: I'm actually glad that particular Mustang bolted, last I heard, the two of them lived in a shoe-box and had seven colts and fillies.
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arizona77
Tenderfoot

USA
16 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  2:57:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit arizona77's Homepage Send arizona77 a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by appygirl

Ree, danged those pretty little palomino ponies! lol]

Arizona, welcome to DE; glad to have you and look forward to hearing more from you. Loved the pics. Do your horses ever have problems with sand colic?




It's great to be here, Appygirl, thanks for the welcome. It's funny you should ask about the sand colic, we are having a record breaking dry spell and our pasture is like walking in powder, uggg!! I am going out to start them on their round of psyillium right now. We've had our App guy colic once since we've been here (about 3 months) and he had never coliced before, boy was that scary. I've been tryin' to get hubby to make some feeders for the ground, but he's not got 'round to it yet;O)
Loree in AZ
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