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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2006 :  2:03:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Welcome E!

Very interesting comment on the one day break-a colt-special!
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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2006 :  3:54:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
As E stated, the 'name brand' clinicians I've audited and talked with, don't advocate the one-day deal either. People that are new to the horse world can easily misunderstand what they're watching and what is going on between the horse and the human....and subsequently, could get seriously hurt. Clinicans/trainers and anyone who's around horses DO and WILL get injured (or worse) regarless of their experience, so why ask for it? A good local (or not-so-local) trainer is invaluable.

The steps outlined by E are one of the best ways to work a colt, or for that matter, any horse who needs to go back to the basics and work on any holes that someone else missed along the way.

Sad to say, but Pat has changed so much over the years, that it's now "Parrelli-dom". Although I know there are quite a few serious Pat-and-Linda lovers.....lots of folks go just to watch and be entertained. Not necessarily a bad thing if that's all you want.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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Western Horsewoman
Tenderfoot

USA
18 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2006 :  11:10:54 AM  Show Profile  Visit Western Horsewoman's Homepage Send Western Horsewoman a Private Message
Hi 34me,

Have you thought about just advertising for exactly what you want in the local newspaper or on the radio? Ask for a trainer that will work WITH you preferably at your home to show you how to train.

I'm spoiled, I guess-- where I've lived in Montana and Wyoming there are a lot of English riding facilities too, but there are also saddle clubs to join and lot of local trainers that put on "colt breaking" clinics and a lot of different equine seminars. Here--you just have to put yourself "in the loop"--join a saddle club, attend local horse-related events and you will start meeting more and more horse people and you'll find what you want. I guess I think of Oklahoma as a cowboy/Western type of state and would think if you start getting out amongst horse people that you are going to meet someone who can help you.

Not sure how far you are from Western Kansas, but I have an uncle in Dighton, Kansas who is ABSOLUTELY EXCELLENT! He works full time and the horse training is his "hobby", but I know he helps a lot of horses with their people problems in his area. I had him start a young filly for me that I wanted my daughter to have when she gets bigger.--He had her doing all kinds of special little things that would help out a kid...like dropping her head to the ground to put the halter on. She was just an excellent little mare when I got her back--very willing, safe and fun to ride (unfortunately she died in a freak accident about a year ago...broke my heart).

Don't get discouraged. I'm sure you can find someone. And, as much as you obviously care about it...you're going to be able to do it.

When your horses know how much you love and care about them..and you develop that bond with them--it's pretty amazing how forgiving they are when you don't do things absolutely perfectly. I started riding my 2 year old mare when I was 14--and I never did 4H, never had any professional riding lessons--but I'd been riding by myself since I was two (thank God for good horses). My cowboy Dad's advice was "put some miles on that horse". So I did basically little to no groundwork, got bucked with or off about every other ride (which somehow didn't matter very much at 14)--but I loved her and she loved me--and somehow we've made it 21 more years and she has been the best horse ever. For at least the last 15 years, I have been able to trust her with anyone--child, inexperience adult--whoever--put them on Dolly and she takes care of them. She's literally saved my life a few times.

Believe me--I DON'T recommend that type of start and obviously God was watching over me and blessed me with a horse with an enormous heart. Please do learn from someone else and put safety first. Do the groundwork for you and your horse. BUT, what I'm trying to say with my long novel is this...you DO NOT HAVE TO BE AN EXPERT OR BE PERFECT to start your horses. But I think the absolutely essential element is that bond of love and trust on both sides.

"This woman's place is in the saddle"
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 03/04/2006 :  1:41:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
34me

I don't think you'll ruin your horses! You are doing things to get educated. Everything takes time. What isn't working can be changed...otherwise there would be no hope for any of us! Having a trainer provides time and consistancy with the horses, plus I think when you gotta pay$$...you pay more attention too! I would think Oaklahoma would be cowboy town and no problem. Maybe check at your feed/tack store for someone they could recommend?

Am thinking about training for one of mine in the spring. Don't think I am ruining him , but putting up with more shennanigans than I should from a youngster. The Clinton Anderson DVD Gaining Respect and Control is a great one for starting in the meantime. Groundwork for despooking, respect, basic lunging. But I have found horses go backwards without refreshers and time spent with them.
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