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34me
Groomer

31 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2006 :  11:08:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit 34me's Homepage Send 34me a Private Message
Hello all,
I have been doing some research on training aids/programs. i have two three year olds (that have been ridden) and 1 long yearling(?). i am not interested in sending them off to be trained because i want to have hands on experience with them and get to know their habits. all of the horses can be caught, haltered, given bathes, groomed, lead with lead ropes, back, and are only really rude at feeding times. So here is the loaded question, Dennis Reis, Clinton Anderson, Parelli, i have looked at their "home study programs" and was just wondering what everyone thought. Thanks in advance.

Edited by - 34me on 02/21/2006 6:33:37 PM

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2006 :  11:10:14 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I like John Lyons, myself.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2006 :  11:33:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
Have seen those mentioned above as well as others many times. I prefer to go back to the Dorrances -> Hunt -> Brannaman.
Why?
Several years ago, was fortunate enough to attend The Ft. Worth (T.Dorrance) Benefit presented by Ray Hunt. It was a who's-who of clinicians. Was able to watch 20+ clinicians work horses on the ground and under saddle (1st ride) all weekend long. If anyone from this forum was there, you know what Hunt had to say about some of the clinicians. Hunt is old-school and can be gruff, but he definately knows people and horses, and makes no bones about either.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2006 :  5:21:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
MY vote is for Johnn Lyons. Good solid horsemanship advice.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Edited by - Hook on 02/22/2006 04:59:57 AM
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Horsecrazygirl
Clinician



USA
2132 Posts

Posted - 02/21/2006 :  7:01:17 PM  Show Profile Send Horsecrazygirl a Private Message
I put my vote for Parelli here and always.
Why?
Because its a very easy homestudy program to follow,and for people to understand.
Yes there is a cost (thats what everyone complains about) But if you get a great relationship with your horse it is well worth it.
Another thing people complain about Parelli is "Hes too commercial" (for some people anyways) But how is anyone going to get the word out to people about this great program and what it can do to you and your horse?

Thanks for reading.


"In the steady gaze of the horse shines a silent eloquence that speaks of love and loyalty, strength and courage. It is the window that reveals to us how willing is his spirit, how generous his heart."

"The horse, gives you the freedom from all life's challenges." H.Z.


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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  12:24:26 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Before you do anything rent of there videos and check them out. Each has different teaching styles and what one would work best for you is not always the one that works for someone else.

Those home study programs cost huge bucks. I think that for someone that is just starting out with training the best thing is a trainer BUT one that will work with you when YOU work the horse. A once a week lesson or maybe 2-3 times a week at the start to show you how to do something and what do when things don't go text book. Then you work on it with the horse in front of them and for the rest of the week. Then you come back to the next lesson, review what you learned and move on to the next step or fix any errors. None of the home study programs give you that and it is the best way to learn. It's much better to have only spent a week dealing with or training an issue into a horse and fix then to fight with it or not know it's wrong until weeks or months later. Plus some of those home study programs cost more then a good trainer/instructor would without the one on one or help when things go wrong. It can be hard to learn and teach something at the same time.

I don't care for limiting to just one trainer. Each of those listed and many that aren't are great trainers and have good methods. I like to have a whole tool box of things I can use when something isn't working out. In your shoes I would probably find a good trainer to work with and then rent/buy/borrow books and videos of many different trainers then to sock in $1,000's into a home study program.
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  10:00:25 AM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message
Hey, 34me, probably most of us get in over our heads in the beginning. That's what keeps trainers, etc in business! Find a trainer who does not get irritated at beginners - one that will relish the idea of helping you get started off right in a lifelong pursuit. They are out there - we have found one. Until you are able to bring your own horses to the trainer, just go yourself and use theirs. They can teach you everything you need to know using one of their horses, then you can take that instruction home and try to apply it to your horses. If it doesn't work, go back the next week and tell them what went wrong. This would apply to everything from horse care, grooming, ground work, riding, training, etc. It will take time, but can be done. Then, when you do get a trailer and can start taking your horse, things will be able to speed up a little. If you are in it for the long haul, then there's no rush. Go slow, be careful, and ask a lot of questions. If you find someone that doesn't have the patience to help a beginner, dump them and go somewhere else. There are plenty who will help you. If you can afford to board at the trainers, and if you will be able to go work with your horse throughout the week, then that would be good until you can get a trailer. In your off time, read, read, read....
I bet everyone on here who got into horses for the first time as an adult can relate to your "in over your head" feeling.

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  10:24:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
In the past, whether it was horses or dogs... I've always gone to watch some of the lesson/training methods used at various local facilities. That way, I felt that I could make an informed decision. Even though you might not completely understand what you're watching...you'll be able to see what you hope is a fit for you and your horse. Not to say that you couldn't be mistaken...everyone has to start somewhere, and I can tell by your posts that you're concerned enough (building barn & roundpen) to keep digging at this to help yourself and your horses....and besides, you can always look elsewhere for another trainer if things don't work out. Sometimes what you see on the surface is not what you bargained for.
No one should be irritated with you. If they are, they're forgetting what their entry into the wonderful world of horses was like. The vast majority of us have learned by trial and error also.

Once again, I agree with stormie....rent or find a friend who already has videos of different clinicans. You're not out $$, and stormie's "tool box" comment is right on.

I wish you luck, and please let everyone know how things are progressing.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  1:02:57 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
I like the trainers mentioned, though some of them in video demo more clearly for me than others. Like John Lyons philosophically, but he is more that than step-by-step direct that I need (blonde). Like Anderson directness and humor, but sometimes hard being as tough no bones about discipline as he sees it to get the job done. Parelli and what I know, seems like a combo of the two. Dennis Reis seems pretty good, but I fall asleep, too monotone for me.

As Stormie said, have lots of options. Horses personalities are different. Clinton methods work good for my TB (she NEEDED a wake up call!) and the POA, he was very sensitive and it just didn't take much to get him in line on the ground. The fjord is a whole different ball game. He just learns differently than the others.

Someone posted Ray Hunt and I went back to his webpage (I'd seen it before). Was a good reminder "listen to the horse, give him time to think it through and let him learn to use his mind" type stuff. That would be the fjord. He logics it out I think more than "cue and do" type of stuff. Noticed he will be in Ojai (couple hours from me) and I think I will inquire about his clinic to audit.

So, guess I would say use training techniques that work well with your personality, style, horses sensibilities. A lot can be learned from videos, but hands on with a trainer sure is wonderful. I've only done it once long ago, and not with the horses I have. Started a save my change fund for it, found a guy in my area that would actually come to my house!! (when I can afford it!) Don't have a trailer either....and sure could use one! Next project after arena footing and truck paid off in summer! 34me, once you get ONE horse, you are in over your head!!! (Since it leads to another horse, and another horse, a trailer, a new arena, more lessons, new tack, feed and treats, etc etc etc
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  3:17:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
That was my thought see if you can find someone in your area to come to you. Thats what I did. I started by asking the vet, farrier, called a couple big barns in the area and actually found several. Had 3 that came out and did a lesson and liked the 3rd best and she still comes to the house and gives my daughter lessons and will be doing training with my new stud and me

Dorthy Brown
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  6:02:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Some trainers will travel to your farm to work horses. Most don't like doing this for full time training if they have a farm to work out of because to work enough horses 5-6 days a week(even trainers need a day off! lol) that's a lot of travel time. Some well come to your place once or twice a week to give a lesson type training to you. I think this is the most ideal for an owner that wants to do it themselves. They have the horse at home and can go work with the horse everyday if they wanted but yet have that hands on with a trainer.

If you can't find that then maybe one would let you board one of them at their place and then give you lessons with them to get you started. What you learn there you can also use with the ones at home. That way you don't have to pay to board all them.

While you are doing that check out the videos and books. Also if you get cable or Sat. see if you can get RFD-TV. It's a great way to get a feel of the trainers that are on there. Right now it's Anderson, Palm, Parelli, Reis, Cameron,......Welhiem.....and Cox, I think that's all them right now plus some others as guests on shows like HorseCity and Horse Sense.

It's a good thing that you do know that you are in over your head just remember that this isn't just you but the horses. So if gets to hard to handle even with the help of a trainer please do the smart thing and step out of it and let someone that knows what they are doing handle it until you are better able to. So many people I know are in over their head without knowing it and the next thing you know it's not them paying the price but the kids/animals/others. So keep an open mind and common sense, do your homework. If something doesn't feel right or just isn't clicking for you or the horse get help asap. Green on Green does equal black and blue. Sometimes it does work out but it never works out 100% in the end without some issues and bumps. Don't let those bumps hold you back, it's not going to be a smooth road.
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tagnrocky
Clinician



USA
1776 Posts

Posted - 02/22/2006 :  9:51:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit tagnrocky's Homepage Send tagnrocky a Private Message
I can relate, 34me. I have had my horses 3 years and I probably have every video set and book on horse training. I learned something from all of them. However I agree with Stormie & hmeyer, personal instruction is so beneficial. I floundered around with my "difficult" horse for 3 summers and every year he would come up with a new challange. I've been run off with, bucked, spun and had 8 unscheduled dismounts. I was usually able to deal with whatever he did, but my confidence dipped lower & lower. Even tho' I loved riding, I was scared to ride my horse. I don't have a trailer, but I found a trainer who will give me lessons on his horse and then I go home and work on my horse. I've only had 2 lessons, but already I've learned what to do to stay on and control my horse. The trainer can see where you are unbalanced and what YOU are doing to effect the horse. I was always thinking about what the horse was doing, not how I was affecting the horse. I had a year of riding lessons before I purchased my horse, but those lesson horses never did what my horse did!
By the way, there is a statistic out there that states something like 90% of new horse owners get out of horses within 5 years. If you'd like to be the 10%, I'd suggest personal instruction of some kind.
Just my 2 cents.

Nancy (and Tag & Rocky)
Free & easy down the trail I go......
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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  12:22:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
How's your palomino bred?

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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Western Horsewoman
Tenderfoot

USA
18 Posts

Posted - 02/25/2006 :  8:51:12 PM  Show Profile  Visit Western Horsewoman's Homepage Send Western Horsewoman a Private Message
Just another quick suggestion.

As I've said before--I don't prescribe to any particular clinician. I think they all have something to offer

However, I do have Parelli's program and equipment--and it is helpful. What helps me SO much more than watching the tapes and trying to do it on my own was to attend a Beginning Level one clinic and have an actual Parelli trainer work with me and my horse in a group setting.

So if you can't find a trainer who will come to you or vice versa--check out some of these big name trainer's sites and see if they have clinics in your area where you can actually participate with your horse.

Also--find some riding buddies in your area. I know if you were close to me, I'd trailer your horses for you.

"This woman's place is in the saddle"
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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  10:02:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
Yes, see if you can find a clinician who will be in your area...or a clinic that's not too far to travel to. Sometimes traveling "ain't" so bad...a little time away from home.....clear out the cobwebs, etc. ;-)
Tack shops, feed supply businesses, your vet or farrier; can all be of help to find a local clinician. Usually these trainers/clinicians have a website you can check out.

Also, if there are any upcoming spring Horse Fair's near you....(many states do have them every year), go and visit various booths to find out who and what's in your area. You'll find tons of great information, including entertainment at these yearly events, all under one big roof.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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paintedbliss
Trainer



USA
618 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  11:50:34 AM  Show Profile Send paintedbliss a Private Message
I really like craig cameron, saw him at equine affaire last year. I have a personal story about him. I attended several clinics and really liked him. I actually ran into him while he was waiting for coffee and i was behind him, we talked about the colt he was training at his clinic, my filly and some problems i was having. He invited my hubby and i to sit and have coffee with him and we talked for over 30min, he seemed really interested in helping us with our fillies problem. He gave me an autographed copy of his book, ride smart which is an invaluable tool. IT is geared to the beginner, but i really liked craig reminded me of an old texas cowboy.
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/27/2006 :  1:25:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
I like watching him on TV too....I bet he has some good stories to tell, he looks mischevious!
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  12:16:33 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by 34me

quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

Hey, 34me, probably most of us get in over our heads in the beginning. That's what keeps trainers, etc in business! Find a trainer who does not get irritated at beginners - one that will relish the idea of helping you get started off right in a lifelong pursuit. They are out there - we have found one. Until you are able to bring your own horses to the trainer, just go yourself and use theirs. They can teach you everything you need to know using one of their horses, then you can take that instruction home and try to apply it to your horses. If it doesn't work, go back the next week and tell them what went wrong. This would apply to everything from horse care, grooming, ground work, riding, training, etc. It will take time, but can be done. Then, when you do get a trailer and can start taking your horse, things will be able to speed up a little. If you are in it for the long haul, then there's no rush. Go slow, be careful, and ask a lot of questions. If you find someone that doesn't have the patience to help a beginner, dump them and go somewhere else. There are plenty who will help you. If you can afford to board at the trainers, and if you will be able to go work with your horse throughout the week, then that would be good until you can get a trailer. In your off time, read, read, read....
I bet everyone on here who got into horses for the first time as an adult can relate to your "in over your head" feeling.


the farrier was here over the weekend and is trying to talk my husband into taking one of our horses and have him "train" her for two months. i dont want to do this so i better figure out some training schedule soon, or i will have to move in with the farrier(just kidding), but i dont want to send her somewhere.



You asked opinions, and personally I LOVE Dennis Reis. I don't understand the bit about him being monotone. He doesn't sound monotone to me at all. I've watched many segments of his on RFD and I think he's excellent. Also fairly amusing. Okay, he's not bad on the eyes either, lol.
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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  09:17:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
Dennis Reis is a very good horseman, but I think that sometimes his cues are imperceptable (don't get me wrong, that's not a bad thing) to newbies, which might cause a little confusion at first. Keep watching though - you do need that stormie "tool box".

I have noticed that DR has become a little more "showy" than he used to be, but that's drawn a bigger audience.

IMHO, DR can be a little monotone at times....like when he's so focused on a colt. It's almost like he's SO into it, that he forgets his audience for a moment --- I'm not saying that's bad, so don't bop me over the head. ;-)

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  10:33:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
I thought his moustache has gotten bigger

He reminds me of Sam Elliot in looks....not hard on the eyes at all

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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  10:49:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
WooHoo......Sam Elliot. Thanks for the visual, fracturedbones.

Now THERE'S an actor I don't mind watching over, and over, and over.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  11:40:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
AMEN Boots!

Interesting, Sam Elliot, even the guys like him as an actor.
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 02/28/2006 :  2:29:23 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Boots

WooHoo......Sam Elliot. Thanks for the visual, fracturedbones.

Now THERE'S an actor I don't mind watching over, and over, and over.


Boots --

Secret Squirrel?

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A man’s soul can’t be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer


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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2006 :  4:47:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
Just checking, hmeyer.... you're on it, huh?

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. – Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 03/01/2006 :  6:37:03 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
The Road to the Horse was held last weekend and Stacy Westfall won! She beat well-known cowboy clinicians Martin Black, Craig Cameron and Van Hargis! More info can be found here.

Sam Elliot... YUM!

A friend that went said that Craig Cameron & another guy pushed around their colts from the back of another horse. I've see Cameron do that on RFD and didn't see the reasoning behind it. The horse I saw was scared and didn't seem to ever understand why Cameron was waving his hands & yanking on the lead rope. I didn't see the entire program so perhaps I missed something.


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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HntrJmprLvr
Tenderfoot



2 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2006 :  10:48:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit HntrJmprLvr's Homepage Send HntrJmprLvr a Private Message
I think this is a good question...first let me say. I've been riding for 16 years. I've been showing for 14 years. I've been training for 9 years. I have two degrees one in Equestrian Science and the other in Horse Science Technology. I'm certified, I've taught lessons, not only do I do english, I know WP and cutting. I've been very lucky to experience SO many different areas in the equine world. On top of that, I've worked under two VERY big trianers. That being said, so hopefully you know I'm not just pulling stuff out of thin air...here are my two cents....

I don't know your riding experience or level. And that should play largely into your decision to train your horses yourself. One of my biggest fears is an inexperienced hand, buying videos and books, and thinking they know how to train a horse. I think this a is a dangerous road to go down, and a time bomb just waiting to go off. Training horses is about timing, and putting pressure on the horse, geting the response you want, and rewarding the horse. And because a horses memory does not hold things for long, you have to reward at the right time. Horses learn from repitition. Another reason why timing is so important. Having a good basic way of going about colt breaking is the best and safest way. Ie:

Longing daily and round pen work
sacking out (not the old cowboy stand on them way, but simply teaching a horse to control its fear)
getting the saddle on
bitting up
getting a response from the ground to the bit
ground driving
getting the horse to give to the bit (ie: side reins)
then acutually riding.

This is fairly eaasy process once you get it down, but I do think there are steps you need to take in training your horses, and needing to be consistant with timing...not to mention wit the training...I work colt 5 or 6 days a week when I'm breaking them out. They get worked, and they get worked consistantly!

The best example if bad timing I can think of is when a rider is learning how to steer a horse...they pull and pull on the horses face and as soon as the horse moves, they do not reward, the just keep pulling, the horse gets frustrated and starts acting out...

Another option you could look into, was one I had to do when I bought my first horse, and what made me decide to pursue training. My first purchase was a 5 yr old TB gelding, off the track, not ridden in years, and was used as a teaser gelding at a breeding farm. I was an intermediatte level rider, with trainer supervision. I took three lessons a week with the trainer, who after seeing my horse act up, refused to ride him. My lessons concentrated on me learning how to train my horse. (I was 15 at the time mind you!) My folks and I decided to find a trainer who would ride the horse, after finding another barn making arrangments to get him there, and getting him settled into his new home, the new 'trainer' refused to ride him too. I was stuck doing the lessons learning how to train my horse. I did take lesosns with two different trainers, a reining trainer, and a hunter trainer! It was a long process, and I don't know that I would do it again, but that horse was the best teacher I ever had. And now, years later, and many training horses later, I feel awful that I had to go about it that way, but in my hometown the two trainers were about all there was. And why a 'trainer' would reccommend a horse like that for an intermediatte rider is beyond me. But as stubborn as I am, I stuck it out, and I still have that gelding, I bonded with him, and as up as he can be, I would fear selling him because he is such a strong horse.

Anyways, a whole novel later, if you are beyond the beginner rider level, and have the facility at home to work your horses consistantly. Maybe looking for a trainer you can ship into for lessons would be an option to look into. That way, you have help, you have a place to go, and someone to help you trouble shoot!

As for your question about which 'name brand' trainer to go with. I've not been impressed with any of them. I think Parrelli is a joke...just my opinion. (I've seen them all in clinics, you know how a lot of them do the break a colt in one day, when I attened college, one of them came for a clinic, and did that. when asked if he does that at home training, he said he'd never break a colt like that, food for thought, eh?) If I had to choose one.....I'd say John Lyons.

Good Luck, I hope this helps!!

~E
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