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 wrong personality for owning a horse?
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offred
Tenderfoot

16 Posts

Posted - 02/19/2006 :  8:57:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit offred's Homepage Send offred a Private Message
This might seem like a strange question but could it be possible that a person might not be a good owner because they do not show strong "herd leader" skills?
I've ridden and had lessons off and on through my life. I finally got the chance, in my 40s, to own a horse. The first, a beloved rescue horse, had too many physical problems and had to be humanely euthanized. I was heartbroken.Others at the boarding stable kindly wanted me to have the chance at a healthy, young horse and urged me to try one that was a "known quantity".
A 6yo gelding that was for sale was recommended. He was used for lessons once a week and he was friendly and mellow (walked around in turnouts, rarely ran or trotted). His owners had lost interest and I paid for the problems of benign neglect with the former owners- new shoes (old ones on for 6 mos, abcessed hoof and thrush, which I treated),scruffy skin, vetted him, got his shots up to date, etc. I have no trouble with bathing him, grooming him, etc. People compliment me on how good he now looks, which he does!
He's reluctant to work, however and it has progressively gotten worse since I bought him 7 weeks ago. Cinchy (using a Bighorn saddle, fit was checked out as okay, I am slow to tighten it). Arena sour. Bolts from the arena (once, with my son on him and he's had 2 years of lessons). Refused to enter another arena and wheeled around and bolted off with me. Reared for my husband. Reared for the trainer and he was very difficult just to move forward under saddle under a professional. I turn him out daily and he's not on a high energy diet.
This horse came recommended to me by the trainer. I am still taking lessons but we've gone back to ground work and I am hearing that I need to be very firm, he is lazy. A friend with horses did ground work with him and found him "defiant"-refusing to move out and walk in the round pen, wheeling around to challenge her. She did get him to go but she had to get very tough. Trainer says he has to be ridden with spurs and a crop. But right now, I can't ride him at all- the bolting, rearing.
I'm wondering- are quiet, not-very-assertive people a poor match for being horse owners? I worried that my personality might be causing the horse to become challenging because he sees me as a "weak leader".
I'm trying hard at ground work but I'm still being told I am not tough enough. Am I a poor match with the horse or a poor match with all horses?

FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 02/19/2006 :  10:30:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Boy, this horse is a REAL handful...so don't blame yourself for not being able to handle it...heck, even the trainer has trouble with it. It sounds like what you are looking for is a nice, relaxing ride with a horse that doesn't want to argue with you about everything. This horse sounds like it has a LOT of issues(rearing, bolting, balking, arena sour,lazy etc.), and needs LOTS of work to become a good, relaxing ride. So to me, it sounds like this isn't the horse for you AT ALL, and could sour you on riding....or worse yet get you hurt. Find a nice, older horse that's been there, done that, and won't fight you on everything. I think you'll be a lot happier. I'd leave this 6 year old to someone who enjoys and wants a challenge...cause that's sure as heck as what he is!! Good luck and keep us posted.

PS: You are not a poor match for all horses...you just need to find the right horse for you. He/she is out there somewhere.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show

Edited by - FLOOPER on 02/19/2006 10:35:41 PM
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offred
Tenderfoot

16 Posts

Posted - 02/19/2006 :  11:04:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit offred's Homepage Send offred a Private Message
Flooper, thank you for your wise words. I keep hearing from others who are fond of the horse that "He just needs consistency" and that "keep taking lessons and you'll become a much better rider" and my HEAD is telling me, Yikes.
If I sell him, I do want to make sure he is treated well. With manners like this, I do worry about finding him a good owner. Despite what trainers said, he isn't safe for kids. Or me. When he bolted with me, he took off towards a railing at the edge of the property and there's at least a 25 ft drop off. I lost my confidence right then and there, even though I got him stopped just barely in time.
I've checked everything. I did notice his personality changed dramatically once the hoof abcess was gone and his teeth were floated (previously the inside of his mouth was raw and bloody due to the sharp edges).
He is a handful. But I feel so strange when trainers and experienced horse people are telling me the horse is a perfect match and all I need is some more lessons and to be more assertive with him.
I'll look for a more mellow horse. I know we aren't enjoying the horse right now, despite being out there every single day. It feels scary and "off". Thanks for letting me know that maybe it's not the right horse/rider combo and not just me!
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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 02/19/2006 :  11:30:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message
It's NOT just you.....I tend to be a little "laid-back" myself. I was lucky and found a great horse when I was young and he and I learned a lot of things together. I have also had a few that I didn't keep very long. This doesn't sound safe or fun for you. I know what it's like to dread going out to ride. It's not fun. There are good horses out there that are perfect for you and I hope you find one. In the mean time...be careful with this horse. They can sense the "uneasiness" that you have and have a tendacy to push you more. You sound like a very good and caring horse owner. There is a horse out there that will appreciate that in you and return it to you many times over. I hope you can find it. It should be rewarding and make you feel good inside. Good luck....he or she is just out there waiting for you to find them. And don't feel bad about it.....there are too many good horses out there to waste your time on a bad one! Happy hunting!
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  02:12:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Well I do think some humans are just not cut out to own some types of animals I don't think that is the case here.

There is a few issues. I would really question the way that this horse is 360 from what they said he was. Why? Did they lie? Did he go through some change in the time that they saw him to when you bought him? Is it maybe health or tack related? If he really was what they said he was then something happened to change it and it probably isn't you. Not with the major change right away like that and not wanting to listen to other people also.

I would not feel right with a trainer that told me a horse was one thing when it wasn't. Of course if the change is health or tack related that isn't really a case of the trainer lying to you but you should never let someone even a trainer talk you in to keeping a horse you don't feel right about.

I think that people that aren't the leader type need a really laid back easy going non boss horse. It sounds like this horse is more of a boss. It isn't so much that you need to be the boss over all horses just the ones you own and work with. If you don't have the temperment to be a boss horse then look for a horse that is less likely to want to be boss over you. It will still take some time and you working to be boss but the horse shouldn't question you as much.

I also have to wonder if all of these people were so fond of him and he was so great why didn't they snap him up. As for him needed consistency, if he was only being ridding once a week in lessons for kids he probably wasn't getting that. On a really lazy, bossy type once a week for work isn't enough. They need more work then that normally.

The mouth problems could be on reason he was so laid back before.
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  05:52:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
I think you need to find a horse that fit's your personality. Have your trainer search for a seasoned horse with some age on it, should be a minimum of 10 years old with a history of gentleness, works well with children and most of all tolerance with absolutely no agressive tendencies. Keep looking until you find a match.
Remember some trainers like to train, that's where they make their money. No problems= no training required.
Horses that are suitable for "experienced" horse people who can manage the problems are not for you. Very easy to give advice to others folks but they really do not want the hassle themselves.
Hold firm to what you want in a horse and keep looking. There is one out there for all of us. Use your own feelings and get to know the horse to see if you click before you buy the next one.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  08:45:13 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
offred,

Welcome to the Board!

I'm sorry you're having problems with your gelding. Had he been ridden regularly before you bought him?

quote:
He was used for lessons once a week and he was friendly and mellow (walked around in turnouts, rarely ran or trotted). His owners had lost interest and I paid for the problems of benign neglect with the former owners- new shoes (old ones on for 6 mos, abcessed hoof and thrush, which I treated)


If his feet hurt because of the thrush, he wouldn't run or trot.

quote:
I did notice his personality changed dramatically once the hoof abcess was gone and his teeth were floated (previously the inside of his mouth was raw and bloody due to the sharp edges).


Who floated his teeth? It might be worth having someone else check his teeth. If they were that bad, perhaps so much had to be ground away that there is an exposed nerve that the bit is hitting. Have you tried to ride him without a bit? (You might want to put the trainer that recommended him on first though. )


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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offred
Tenderfoot

16 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  09:47:23 AM  Show Profile  Visit offred's Homepage Send offred a Private Message
I've been thorough in going through all possible physical reasons for behavior. I treated his hooves for thrush and the farrier said his feet look wonderful (and he was well behaved for the farrier, no problems with ground manners). I used a vet whose speciality is equine dentistry to float his teeth.
What is concerning to me are the hints that the horse may not be all he was advertised to be. A parent said she remembered the horse from his lesson days and that he was difficult for the kids. That he tossed kids off on trail rides twice, but when I pressed for details, it was because the kids were goofing off and deserved it. Or so I was told.
I asked over and over before I purchased him, "Is it possible that I could 'mess up' this horse with my relative inexperience?" and the answer was, Oh no. But excellent riding is like dancing and I'm wondering if my dance partner (the horse) is reacting to someone who is trying hard but doesn't always place her hands and feet exactly so.
Add that to a non-assertive person and I think I'm in over my head.
I sure do appreciate all the good advice here! Thank you, all!
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offred
Tenderfoot

16 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  09:54:35 AM  Show Profile  Visit offred's Homepage Send offred a Private Message
I forgot to add that yes, we tried him in a bosal bridle and bareback pad. Even with those,he has to have the rider be very firm with him and if he isn't in a round pen, on a longe line, he'll bolt or rear. Very hard to get into a trot and to keep into a trot. My husband felt so humiliated on lesson with him- the horse would only take three steps forward and then crab around, tail swishing, fighting constantly to leave the arena It's as if he assumes that his life's job is to stand and be adorable, no work for him.
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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  10:09:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message
Face it...there is NO chemistry here. There is a good horse out there willing to work for and with you....and your husband. They are hard to find but well worth the effort. I hope you find him. You'll know it when you do! Hang in there!
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  10:12:32 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
It sounds like this horse isn't what he was advertised to be. If he was used for lessons, then he may have been allowed to get away with things by inexperienced riders. Horses that seem like wonderful horses (and may very well be) can & will learn behaviors that will get them out of work and if an inexperienced person doesn't know what to do, the behavior will get progressively worse.

No horse is worth getting hurt over so I'd say sell him. Even if you take a loss on the horse, it'd be better than feeding him & keeping him shod & vetted and not being able to ride him.




Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  10:26:35 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Believe it or not, there are more passive, laid back horses out there. I'd say it's not totally you, but that you have a horse that's not suited for you... just like everyone else on this forum has been saying. A horse that will bolt, buck, or rear with any rider is no horse for someone just starting out. He needs someone to ride him that knows what he's doing.

I've owned 3 horses that are excellent examples of different types of temperament, disposition, and personality traits:

Terra is my favorite, right now, but she would scare the daylights out of a timid rider. She has fire under the roof and can be a handful... lots of "let's go and do things" type attitude But I like that, because I know how to handle it. I've also trained every horse I've owned, and she was the first one I ever sent to a trainer because of a respect problem. The trainer had that fixed in less than a month, and I took it from there. Now, she's a great horse for me, but she is definitely not a beginner's horse or for a timid rider.

Dove is a fairly mellow fellow, but if you dig deep enough, you will find fire and some bullheadedness under that beautiful hide. He started out life with humans later than most in that he wasn't used for anything until I bought him as an almost 3 year old stallion. I gelded him 2 weeks after purchasing him. But because of his early up bringing, he still doesn't totally trust people. For example; the one time he unloaded after spooking at a deer, he ran off and left me! That was the only time I've ever had a horse do that! Also, if he gets upset with something he doesn't like, he will fight back and mean business. BUT I do use him for teaching beginners and non-riders how to ride... but this is in an arena and under my watchful eye and close supervision. I have a 9 year old who thinks he's the greatest horse in the world... but there is no way, I'd trust her to ride him without me being right there to watch every single detail.

And last but not least is Warrior(he died 5 years ago). This would be the type of horse for you. He was extremely mellow, and as long as you weren't deliberately mean to him, he had a heart of gold. He would put up with all kinds of rider errors and you could do anything with him. His whole attitude was like "Oh! You want me to do this? Are you sure? Well, okay. There! I did it. Is that enough? Can we quit now?" I'm sure you get the drift, and there are horses out there like this. They're usually a little bit harder to find, so you may have to look for a while, but they are out there.

So, my best advice would be for you to sell this gelding and start looking for a horse like Warrior. The horse you have is going to hurt you sometime down the line and it's just not worth it. My best advice is to follow your heart and throw in some good solid common sense in on the side. You have to get a horse that suits YOUR needs and will keep you safe.

Good hunting.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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jrm21
Tenderfoot



USA
17 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  10:35:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit jrm21's Homepage Send jrm21 a Private Message
While I am not a horse expert or trainer, I did want to throw in a comment here based on my limited equine experience and slightly wider experience with dog training (and child raising).

I agree completely with the comments from the other posters. While this particular horse may not be for you, there is sure to be horse out there that would be a good fit. The point I want to make is that "assertive" behavior is not the key. CONFIDENCE is what matters. From your post and the questions you ask, it seems to me that you are not confident with this horse (considering it's behavior, that is understandable). It has always seemed to me that animals and children are especially sensitive to a lack of confidence. Tone of voice, body language, etc. - they pick up on it all. you don't necessarily need to be loud, agressive or assertive (at least not with all horses). You do need to be confident - when you ask for something, you need to "know" that they will listen, and they need to know that there is no "question" in your mind.

Easier than it sounds. :) Guess what I am saying is that you don't need to change your personality. You simply need to find a horse with a personality that you are comfortable with and you feel confident you can handle.

Hope this helps,

--Joe
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ttyndale
Trainer

USA
744 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  11:54:46 AM  Show Profile  Visit ttyndale's Homepage Send ttyndale a Private Message
A lot of good post have already gone forth.

I like what RH said about FOLLOW YOUR HEART. Your gut feeling is saying to get rid of this horse so I agree that you should do exactly that. Don't listen to those telling you that you should keep it when you feel in your gut that you should do exactly the opposite. Maybe if you were 25 years younger with a bunch of heart and time you could work through it but not advisable at this juncture in your life.

There you have it my 3 cents worth. :)
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/20/2006 :  12:40:05 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message

Agree with all the advice. Had a similar problem a few years back with a horse. Asked different people and got all kinds of advice. Answers ran from one spectrum to the other. Best advice I got was from an old cowboy who said "too many good horses out there to ride to put up with a bad one". Wish I would have listened!!

Maybe these behaviors were why prior owners lost interest. You may never know the "why". Given the neglect for his general health, who knows what else was neglected on riding and manners?

Horse is young, maybe an experienced person can fix him whether you sell or give away. No point in you risking major injuries.

Doesn't sound like you are the cause of this horse's behaviors at all. Being laid back and a quiet person is fine. Whatever horse you have though, good idea to learn how to assert yourself and correct errant behaviors of a #1000lb animal. I think there is a better horse out there for you..good luck and let us know how things go. Interesting story and want to hear the rest.
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appygirl
Clinician



USA
3211 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  08:54:44 AM  Show Profile Send appygirl a Private Message
It definitely sounds like this horse has several issues. I find it interesting that he came highly recommended by the trainer, whom (I presume) couldn't get him to respond well when he rode him. And my mind boggles that this horse was recommended as 'kid safe.'

My opinion is simply this: There are too many good horses available to deal with a bad one. I wouldn't say it's an age issue, as 6 years is generally an age when horses begin to really mellow out. What you need to be looking for is a horse who exhibits calm traits and is extremely well-mannered.

Regardless of what those at your boarding facility think, this horse doesn't sound like he is for you, and you should follow your line of thinking and sell him to find one more suitable.


Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  09:47:09 AM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
OffRed
First of all welcome! You are getting lots of great advice! Notice that not a single person said that this is a good horse for you and to keep it!!! We tend to be cautious about "riders in bad situations" around here for good reason, it's a been there done that sort of thing!;).

I can't tell you how many times I've seen someone take on a underfed, in poor health horse, because "s/he's just the sweetest kindest horse" only to find out that when the health issues are cleaned up s/he's a monster!

Is there the possibility that he's getting more grain than before and that this is contributing to is "attitude"?



<'\__~
_(( // ====

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Boots
Beginning Rider



USA
72 Posts

Posted - 02/23/2006 :  1:04:49 PM  Show Profile  Visit Boots's Homepage Send Boots a Private Message
Yup, I agree with the others....find him a new zip code.

You said he was used for lessons once a week? Was that by the trainer/instructor at the barn? If so, why in the world would the horse have been kept in that poor condition? Lesson horses need to be well cared for - well, it goes without saying that all horses do...but addressing your particular situation here.

Lesson horses are used to provide a (fun) service to the public, and it is in everyone's best interest to have a horse who's comfortable, happy, and ready to work.

Like many of you, I've done the "aawww....this horse has been abused, starved, and abandoned" (rescue) thing. My situation worked out okay, but with much, much, much, much work. Yeah, once mine was fed, wormed, floated, trimmed, etc., she had some LIFE to her!

Sounds like you were steered in the wrong direction by a number of folks. BTW, the trainer should care about his "good name" and place horses very carefully. Of course mistakes can be made by anyone making a sale (or purchase), but most people are not usually shy about warning others concerning the treatment and "help" they've received.

There's a good match out there for you, take your time, check out lots of horses, and if you can, have a TRUSTED, knowledgable, horse savvy person help you.

Wishing you the best.

Boots

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Tell me, and I forget. Teach me, and I may remember. Involve me, and I learn. Ben Franklin
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Truth is not determined by a majority vote.
- Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger
(Now Pope Benedict XVI)

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offred
Tenderfoot

16 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  09:38:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit offred's Homepage Send offred a Private Message
I want to tell everyone, your words of advice are well heeded. I had an interesting experience yesterday- a 12 year old girl came up to me at the stables and said,"Oh, you are the new owner of that horse!" And then
all sorts of information came out. Oh my.
Last year during one lesson my horse did not want to do a small jump and bolted out of the arena with a child on his back. "He hates that arena!" the girl told me.
And that is where he got so sour and bolted with me. The girl continued. That he had been leased out to kids "who let him get away with everything". That on a trail ride, he spooked, backed up and up and up, then reared. With a child.
He was harder than heck to get moving into a trot and cranky about work, depending on the day. The girl (a horse owner herself), said, "Personally, I don't like or trust that horse."
Out of the mouths of babes...
I must have been seen as the good Samaritan. I had an outside trainer (highly recommended in the area) come and evaluate him. The man said the horse was acting like horses do but was lacking some key areas of training. He worked with the horse for an hour and did some de-spooking work with him. I could see a big change just in that hour.
I did ride the horse during a lesson yesterday. He was difficult to move forward and keep by the rail in the arena. I was told I wasn't being assertive enough with the horse but memories of rearing and bolting had me uneasy. Push him enough and he figures out all too quickly he can scare me.
I'd like to recind the sale. He was papered but the owners didn't produce them after my check cleared. I have the sales receipt but still I think I've been had, in more ways than one.
The whole situation is making me leery about horse ownership. I'm not seeking any fast, dramatic riding. Quiet trail riding is my goal.
What is a reasonable price for a "bombproof" horse? The current trainer said "there's no such thing" and if I were to look, such an animal would cost between $3000-$4000. I'm not looking for a registered horse and looks don't matter.
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TripleB
Beginning Rider



65 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  10:07:59 AM  Show Profile  Visit TripleB's Homepage Send TripleB a Private Message
offred, There is such a thing! I got my bombproof kid horse from a wonderful woman in a financial situation, she needed money and we were on a budget. She let me have him knowing he would get all the love he could want. She had turned down a person wanting him for lessons, worried he wouldn't get proper care. (strange I thought) But I feel very lucky I paid $1700 for him, he isn't picture perfect in looks, but I love him so much! I got him three days before my mom died, so I now have an extra special bond with him, and he takes good care of me!
His picture is on here under the thread "My Friend Boots" He is NOT for sale, LOL But as you can see they are out there, we got lucky! Good Luck finding your horsie soulmate!!

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paintedbliss
Trainer



USA
618 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  10:53:38 AM  Show Profile Send paintedbliss a Private Message
I had been through a couple of horses til i found my chloe last october. She was 2,ooo, had a dust allergy people thought i was nuts but i bought her because she was kind. A horse can tell you alot about by their eyes. She sounds alot like redhawks horse warrior. Chloe has had over 5 owners in her 7 year life and needless to say has a home to stay. Her last owner only had her 6 months and did not want to deal with wetting her hay, It was a small price to pay for such a wonderful mare. I was very timid when i bought her in october, had not been on a horse for a few years from bad experiences with lesson horses. She is very patient and does whatever i ask within reason, with an understanding as long as i have soft hands. I have not had as much fun as i have had in the last few months. She is a reg paint, through apha and other owners found out she was a reiner.
There is a horse out there waiting to claim you, i looked over 1 year before i found my girl, find a horse that you can love and have fun with.
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  11:03:47 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
I would say there are no TOTALLY bomb proof horses...any living horse can spook, buck, etc. in certain circumstances...but there sure are some that come very close to being bombproof. A lot of them don't come with papers, and might not be the prettiest or the showiest...but they will bring you home safe, give you a nice ride, and not argue with you over every little thing you ask them to do. I found three I consider pretty much bombproof, that I would put anyone on...one cost $1200, one cost $1800 and one cost $2200...so to me, $3000 to $4000 sounds a bit high, but could depend on time of year you buy, and where you live. They ARE out there. Oh...and all mine are AT LEAST 15 years old and were all used as ranch and trail horses in their previous lives. I love the old ranch horses, because they learned early on how to work and not argue. For them, compared to working feed lots or doing 12 hours shifts of fence-row duty, a 4 hour trail ride is a piece of cake!!!

Actually, I have found that things like "used as a lesson horse" and "rode by kids" are not always good selling points! Many lesson horses have become sour and obstinate (not all of them, of course) from hour after hour of riding in a circle with a kid kicking the crap out them, and don't want to work. And many "rode by kids" horses have been allowed by those kids to get away with anything and everything, or else taught there is only one speed...full out gallop. From my personal experience, they are rarely very well-disciplined or trained, even though they may be gentle and "nice horses." I would also run, not walk, away from a horse advertised as "was used as a trail horse at a kid's camp." Translation--the horse will not be happy doing anything other than having it's nose up the butt of another horse and following it around." Try taking it anywhere on it's own, and you're going to have problems.

But...get a horse that was used by a ranch hand or a serious trail rider day-in-and-day-out, and the chance are good you'll end up with a horse that doesn't spook easilly, is willing to work, and does what is askd the first time. Anyway, that's been my experience...but then again, I've only owned and ridden horses for a couple of years...but at least it will give you the perspective of someone who isn't a great rider, and what I have found works best for people of my level. Send this one packing, and get a horse you LOVE to ride...it's a whole different experience!!

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  11:05:07 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by TripleB

offred, There is such a thing! I got my bombproof kid horse from a wonderful woman in a financial situation, she needed money and we were on a budget. She let me have him knowing he would get all the love he could want. She had turned down a person wanting him for lessons, worried he wouldn't get proper care. (strange I thought) But I feel very lucky I paid $1700 for him, he isn't picture perfect in looks, but I love him so much! I got him three days before my mom died, so I now have an extra special bond with him, and he takes good care of me!
His picture is on here under the thread "My Friend Boots" He is NOT for sale, LOL But as you can see they are out there, we got lucky! Good Luck finding your horsie soulmate!!



I hate to tell you this but NO horse is 100% bombproof. Even the gentlest horse in the world will do something that can hurt you if given the chance. Horses are always on the defensive, and if they feel threatened badly enough, they will forget you are even there and look after #1 first... themselves. You can never put total trust in any horse. If you do, you are just asking to get hurt. So, always follow proper proceedures when working around any horse... bomb proof or not. The first time you let your guard down or place yourself where that horse can easily hurt you, I can guarantee he will... even if it's unintentional. I've had it happen too many times, so I know from experience. Please, keep safe, people, and use a good dose of common sense regardless of how laid back and easy going that horse may seem to be... PLEASE.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  1:06:24 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I agree about the "bombproof" horse. A 100% bombproof horse is a myth but there are some out there that come close. I agree with Flooper about the "ridden by kids" & "used as a lesson horse". Many times those phrases translate into "ill tempered, spoiled, if I don't wanna, I ain't gonna" horses.

quote:
I'd like to recind the sale. He was papered but the owners didn't produce them after my check cleared. I have the sales receipt but still I think I've been had, in more ways than one.



Have you told the former owners how you feel and asked again for the papers? If you have something that states you will get the registration papers and haven't, then I'd think you'd have a case against them. Flooper & Dodi (I think) have both had court cases decided in their favor.

Sane, safe, sound horses are out there so don't give up.


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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appygirl
Clinician



USA
3211 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  2:55:44 PM  Show Profile Send appygirl a Private Message
The only bombproof horse is a dead horse. I have said that often when someone tells me their horse is bombproof. Something, somewhere, somehow will spook even the quietest of good-natured horses. Now there are 'been there, done that' horses around who have been desensitized to many things and ones that will not bolt if they spook, but rather 'spook in place'.

One thing I have often said as well is there are too many good horses out there to put up with a bad one.


Appygirl

Man does not have the only memory,
The animals remember,
The earth remembers,
The stones remember,
If you know how to listen, they will tell you many things.
- Claude Kuwanijuma - Hopi Spiritual leader


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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 02/24/2006 :  4:24:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Offred, I don't know how long you have had your horse and if that would play a part in wanting to recind the sale.

Like you, all I really want to do is quiet trail riding. Doesn't sound like asking for much, but that really is a specialty horse classification too!! Takes a confident horse to be on trail alone, lots of despooking training as well as learning it's cues etc! Just like barrels, cutting, jumping, it takes time and training.

Remember going to a dude ranch years ago. Most of the guests had never or rarely ridden. Head cowboy took us all over the working ranch in the mountains, pretty hefty terrain. He said the horses they used were their retired ranch horses. After 8 years or so of chasing cows at a run up and down mountains, they were very content to walk at a slow pace with a rider that didn't ask much! If they acted up, he'd turn, yell their name, and they'd knock it off!

Have heard ex police, parade, ranch type horses will make good trail mounts. I didn't fare well in the ex ranch horse area, he apparantly thought he was TOTALLY retired!

Next horse, I'd write in a month's trial clause , maybe make it like a lease one month then buy at whatever price agreed upon.
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