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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2006 :  2:29:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Hi- I have many questions- I have in the past been on this forum for advice and it's been very helpful. I've had my horses for about 2 years now, 18yr QH gelding and 13yr TB mare. I ride just pleasure and some trails(very limited and alone)We will be relocating to the NC mountains this year from Long Island NY. My horses are boarded and in dirt pens. They are fed hay 2X a day and grain. Now, in NC they will have pasture. Will I still need to hay and grain them? The barn owner says no, is this true? Will I really save all that $ not buying hay and grain? Next, I know there is certain types of gass pasture they will need to eat to be healthy. How do I determine this? Next, I will be moving them professionally(no trailer and no experience)How do I find responsible horse movers? What do I need to know about this? Other than I will need tranquilizers until they arrive- I will be a wreck!!! Nervous mom-they're my first horses! Anything anyone could tell me would be greatly appreciated. P.S. My girl has slight navicular-will this be any sort of a problem for moving and rolling pasture land? Sorry if I sound ignorant-I am.

Edited by - aradia412424 on 01/31/2006 2:55:18 PM

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/31/2006 :  10:01:06 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
You will need to feed ahy for at least part of the year and you may or not need to feed grain. Grain will depend on the type of pasture, the work load and the horse's needs. Some need grain to keep weight on some don't. A lot of people don't grain when the horses are on pasture, personally I think that no pasture is going to give 100% of what horses need so some supplementing is needed. Sometimes that is grain or just supplements depending on what is needed. I grain year round no matter the work load but how much depends on the horse's needs. Sometimes it's just a cup to get them to eat the supplements...or because I feel bad that everyone else is getting something!

The pasture is going to depend on the area and something that you will have to find out what is growing in the land already and what grows well there. County ex. offices can normally help with that. How much pasture you have and how well it grows will decide if you have to feed hay or not. If you have poor grass or not enough grass you will need to feed hay in the summer to make up for that. But on the other hand if you have high quaility grass or the horse's tend to over eat you will need to pull them off for part of the 24 hours so they don't develop health problems from that and you may need to feed some hay depending on the case. I pull mine off during the day and put them in a dry lot for weight contral.
Does the barn owner know of any haulers? Also ask your vet and farrier and tack stores.
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giddyupmorgan
Trainer



846 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2006 :  03:43:55 AM  Show Profile Send giddyupmorgan a Private Message
aradia, we get a mag. called the Yankee Pedlar (I think thats what its called, kids must have signed up for it at Equine Ex.) Seems to mostly deal with the New England area equine happenings. It has lots of adds (don't they all) so if you can get your hands on 1 maybe you can find a pro mover. Make sure to ask for references.
Thats gonna be quite a culture shock, from NY to NC.
Hope everything will work out ok.

Keeping The Kids In a Saddle and Out of Trouble
Giddyup
"Holy Moly I'll Buy What They're Selling" LJD (Get A Little Mud On The Tires)


Morgan's riding log
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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2006 :  6:38:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Thank you for your advice. I'll check out the pasture situation when we visit again in Feb(just humans going no animals). And I'll probably take hay and their grain down with me and wean them off as time goes.I'm searching for haulers-is there anything I should be asking them? Shipping boots? Protective headgear? How long should they ride before resting (12-14 trip). They won't be taken out right? When they get to me - should I stall them for a few days? Is there something I should know about re-acclimating them to a new home environment? I'm sure the hauling company will tell me all this, but it's always good to hear other opinions. Culture shock? Naaaa- I can't wait to get to the mountains and the horses will finally have enough room to run!Love that sound!
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/01/2006 :  8:17:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I can't help with the hauling part. We have always hauled our own horses so I don't know how proff. haulers do it. I do know that some will use boots and some won't.

I would stall them or better yet have them in a small pen for a few days. Something safe. That way they aren't too fresh and stressed out when checking out the new pasture. Make sure you walk it first, check the fences and for anything dangerous. Useing the grain and hay are use to is a good thing. If they aren't use to being stalled and/or are getting a lot of grain you may need to cut the grain back a bit so they don't get to high with being stalled.
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tinybarrels
Tenderfoot

11 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  11:54:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit tinybarrels's Homepage Send tinybarrels a Private Message
Aradia .. Have there been horses in the pasture ? How big ? Yours, are not used to pasture so you really need to introduce them to it, slowly. You don't want them to "Pig Out", they could get sick or even worse, collic or founder. Will you be able to get your grain, there ? If not .. stock up ... for the tansition. Generally, it is suggested, to change feeds, gradually, over a 2 week period.
If they have not been hauled frequently or for a while .. Don't "stuff them" befor they leave. It will be easier on them. Free choice water, tho.
After the transition .. Watch them .. you will be able to see if they meed more or less grain/hay or none, at all.
Relax .. Have Fun & Enjoy your new surroundings ..
Good-Luck.
Julie

<\___~
_//_\\_ Keepin' the Furry Side up & the Metal Side down ...
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  12:03:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
The open pasture will be very good for your navicular horse. The additional excercise and walking the horse gets, the better the navicular will be because walking, moving stimulates blood flow to the hoof. You might see a nice improvement. The ride may make the horse walk a bit peg-legged and stiff for a while...depending on how severe the navicular is. My navi mare always got a little stiff from long rides...a little bute always helped

Our horses get no grain or hay when on 24/7 pasture (at least when the pasture is growing well--and no drought like last year). They stay very fat and healty on just that--but every pasture, and every horse is different.

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show

Edited by - FLOOPER on 02/03/2006 12:07:38 PM
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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  7:16:31 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Hey guys-thanks soooo much for more input. tineybarrels- the land is about 25 acres 3/4 in pasute rest in woods, no horses just empty land. I know I'll have to check the grass out- but how? The grain I'm taking with me and hay. Only because I don't know anyone there and only time will allow me to hook up with other horse people.Should I invest in some grain muzzles? My horses haven't been hauled for over 1 1/2 years. Then they'll go on a 12-14 hour trip!?! Told you I'm going to be a wreck until they arrive.Grant it- this will take place by the end of the summer, so I have until then to make myself nuts! What fun!!
Flooper I'm so glad my mare will be better on pasture. She just has slight navicular. I had special shoes on her in the summer $$$$$$ and she was great, pulled off for the winter and I can tell a little difference.I'd like to keep her barefoot and try some "natural trimming" for navi horses. Bute I have-do you think I should start her on them maybe a week before the trip or should I wait until they arrive? Again comes the grass situation as stormie advised I'm going to check with the cty exec. hopefully they can help me.Thanks again everybody!!
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  07:38:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
As Tiny barrels said Make sure , as in ANY change in feed and particular in moving to a new pastrue make sure you introduce the horse to the new pasture gradually. Be particularly careful with new growth grasses and alfalfa.

Mrs. Hook insists every spring that we repeat the process. Starts out with 10 minutes the first day, after they have been fed hay, increasing by 5 minutes each day until they get to 30 minutes. Then increase by 10 minutes until 1 hour , then by 15 minutes until two hours. After two hours you are probably okay but 1/2 days for the first 2 or 3 days is probably best. sound a bit extreme but We have NEVER has a case of colic or grassfounder using this process.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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aradia412424
Beginning Rider

129 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  6:22:32 PM  Show Profile  Visit aradia412424's Homepage Send aradia412424 a Private Message
Thanks Hook- believe me, I will take extra precautions with the feeding transition- these are my babies!!! Farrier is coming on Tues. so I get to pick his brain about all this.... by the way is that you horse in the picture? Beautiful face!!!
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  7:23:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
That is Hook's face in the picture. Notice the Hook in his blaze.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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