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BreezedBayou
Beginning Rider



USA
67 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  06:43:55 AM  Show Profile  Visit BreezedBayou's Homepage Send BreezedBayou a Private Message
You are right and I do have 2 more 5 day sessions with her but for now since the weather has been half way decent here in South Eastern Virginia I am going to see how far I can get her through the basics. I am a bit nervous as I am not a trainer and she is my first horse but I did read the Clinton Anderson article about lateral flexion and it made total since so I am going to see what I can do. I think I may look for a french link snaffle for her. She is an Arabian so I know I read somewhere that some of them may have lower palettes or bigger tongues or something like that.
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/03/2006 :  08:06:29 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Breeze,

I'm glad you read the Anderson articles. I found them really helpful.

Since your mare has learned incorrect response to cues from the reins, it may actually take longer for her to relearn correct responses. She has "unlearn" first. Go slow and take your time. Don't try to force her head but apply enough pressure to make her uncomfortable so she wants to get away from the pressure. She'll probably raise her nose, pull the opposite way or try to stretch her nose out but just maintain the same pressure on the bit. She isn't going to touch your boot with her nose on the first try but once she understands what she needs to do to get relief from the pressure, she will.

Let us know how it goes!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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BreezedBayou
Beginning Rider



USA
67 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  1:04:35 PM  Show Profile  Visit BreezedBayou's Homepage Send BreezedBayou a Private Message
I tried our the full cheek snaffle this afternoon. I just bridled her and tried from the ground. I pulled the reins to the left she moved her head and neck to the left, I did the same and got the same result. I pulled back low on both reins and told her to back. She fought me a bit on that but we have been practicing backing on the ground. But she did do it and I tried to be aware to release after she stepped back for the reward.

So she is responding go the bit from the ground. I think this must show that it is in the saddle she isn't respecting me in the saddle.
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  2:00:18 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
she is responding go the bit from the ground. I think this must show that it is in the saddle she isn't respecting me in the saddle.


I don't know that she's not respecting you as much as she's still really green and doesn't know what you want from the saddle. The work from the ground is a start and will help once you're on her though.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  2:01:55 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Yes she isn't respecting you in the saddle but work from the ground like you did help to lighten her up and get her brain working on this idea of giving to the bit. So keep up the work on the ground. Do that before every ride and really focus on lightness. You can do it in the halter also when you lead her to and from the pasture, during grooming/saddle. It's not the bit but it's still getting her to move her body when you ask. Then repeat the same stuff when you are in the saddle before you ask her to walk off. And when you go forward would one directing her body. Bending the head around, moving her hindquarters over, doing circles.

Also don't ask for the back not yet anyway. When you are on the ground and put pressure on both reins at once you don't want her to back you want her to give her head....lightly tuck the nose in towards the chest. This is her getting light to the bit. It's best to teach this before backing because it makes them light, gets the head down the back up and get soft. Horses that don't learn this first tend to pop the head up, hollow the back and get stiff when you are trying to teach it. Also when in the saddle and you ask for the back it isn't just pulling back on the reins. You fix your hands, give the horse leg cues, sit deep and say back. Your leg is asking for movement your hands and seat are directing that movement backwards.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 02/04/2006 :  4:23:01 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
This is how I back my horses, and I'm sure what Stormie does is either very similar or basically the same thing:

The first thing is to try not to lean back or forward in the saddle but to stay balanced. Then, take up on the reins until you can just feel your horse's mouth without applying very much pressure. At the same time, push her forward with your legs so you can feel her bring her back legs up and under her body. Then apply just enough bit pressure to get her to tuck her head (not raised it) and take that first step back. In time, she should continue to back until you release all your cues and sit quietly on her back.

But be aware, she must understand what you are asking her to do. This is where the ground work with getting her to flex and move away from pressure comes in. If she's the least bit stiff or tense, you will not get her to back correctly and smoothly. Don't push it, take your time, and don't get discouraged if she doesn't respond the way you want her to. Backing is a little more advanced than what she's ready for at this stage of the game. Work on gaining control from the ground and then transfer that to the saddle. It'll all come with time.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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BreezedBayou
Beginning Rider



USA
67 Posts

Posted - 02/06/2006 :  9:43:53 PM  Show Profile  Visit BreezedBayou's Homepage Send BreezedBayou a Private Message
Thank you guys, your advice has helped me tremendously! It has given lots of things to think about and work on and has given me incentive to get out there and work, work, work!
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