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 Leg wraps for trailering??
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  06:14:36 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
I see references to leg wraps for trailering. When we trailered Cloud home (40 minute ride) we didn't put anything on her.

And this ties in with my non-knowledge about leg wraps entirely. What are the various uses for them? Under what circumstances do you use them?

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  07:47:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
We always use leg wraps for trailering for extra tendon support and keep them down over the coronet band in case they step on their feet when shifting as the trailer moves.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  08:39:06 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
So Hook, are these leg wraps what appear to be like ace bandages... fully elasticized? If so I think I have some, don't know what kind of shape they're in. Also don't know how tight to make them.

And you wrap them all the way down to the hoof? How high up on leg do you start?
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  2:54:09 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
For trailering what most people do is use some type of quilt wrap, i use No bows normally. Then you put standing wraps or polos over that to hold it in place.

I do like hook, all the way down so that it covers the top of the hoof. But I don't do this for every trailer ride. Always when going to shows, nothing ruins a good bath then poop stains on a white sock! And when the trip is going to be on the long side or I know the roads are harder on the horse.

You can use just polos(from just below the knee to the ankle) for protecting the leg from bumps when riding. You can also use track, standing or flannels for the same thing but I think that they give some support also. You can also put cotton or other layer under them for this.

You can use quilts and standing(like wraps) for wrapping legs for support after a work out or when one leg is hurt. I know a few vets that swear that if you wrap one leg you have to wrap the other in the pair(front or back or all 4).

You can use wraps to hold ice or hot packs on also. So basicly they are for Support, protection, or medical reasons. Which case you have depends on what you use and how you use it. BUT you shouldn't put wraps on unless you know how. You can easilly bow a tendon if you wrap it wrong(which is funny because there is always fighting about what is the correct way!). Basicly it doesn't made which way the wrap is going around the leg(studies have proven that) but that you need to make sure there is no lumps and that it is not too tight or too loose. There is books and I'm sure directions on the net that show you how to do it. If you work on it you should be able to learn and get a feel for it. If the tightness part worries you find someone that can show you what the correct wraps are.

OR if it worries you that much you can just get away with boots. They make boots for just about everything you use wraps for but learning how to wrap is still good for medical reasons.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  5:58:03 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Stormie

For trailering what most people do is use some type of quilt wrap, i use No bows normally. Then you put standing wraps or polos over that to hold it in place.

I do like hook, all the way down so that it covers the top of the hoof. But I don't do this for every trailer ride. Always when going to shows, nothing ruins a good bath then poop stains on a white sock! And when the trip is going to be on the long side or I know the roads are harder on the horse.

You can use just polos(from just below the knee to the ankle) for protecting the leg from bumps when riding. You can also use track, standing or flannels for the same thing but I think that they give some support also. You can also put cotton or other layer under them for this.

You can use quilts and standing(like wraps) for wrapping legs for support after a work out or when one leg is hurt. I know a few vets that swear that if you wrap one leg you have to wrap the other in the pair(front or back or all 4).

You can use wraps to hold ice or hot packs on also. So basicly they are for Support, protection, or medical reasons. Which case you have depends on what you use and how you use it. BUT you shouldn't put wraps on unless you know how. You can easilly bow a tendon if you wrap it wrong(which is funny because there is always fighting about what is the correct way!). Basicly it doesn't made which way the wrap is going around the leg(studies have proven that) but that you need to make sure there is no lumps and that it is not too tight or too loose. There is books and I'm sure directions on the net that show you how to do it. If you work on it you should be able to learn and get a feel for it. If the tightness part worries you find someone that can show you what the correct wraps are.

OR if it worries you that much you can just get away with boots. They make boots for just about everything you use wraps for but learning how to wrap is still good for medical reasons.



Well, I don't know how to leg wrap, and I'm reticent about guessing in terms of too tight. Susan didn't wrap coming here (40 minutes), so for how long of a trip would it be advised to wrap legs?

This is probably hard to describe so if I just go to stateline and ask about the wraps, maybe they know, because I don't know a polo from "track, standing or flannels," in short, once again I'm clueless about something that's basic to horse ownership. :-(
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  6:42:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
I asked Mrs Hook to tell you how to wrap for trailering but she said it is so important to do it right that, other that make sure you have "No Bow" quilts, (kinda fluffy quilted)you need to get a knowledgeable person to show/train you how to do it right. Too tight can cause bowed tendons and too loose will not provide the support. For just trailering you can buy "shipping boots" at your local tack store, perhaps Chuck has some, that still provide the impact protection for trailering.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  8:45:59 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
yes wraps can be tricky. Get someone who knows to show you how. And practice on a nice quiet horse that is used to being wrapped particularly if you want to wrap the back legs. Personally I like the shipping boots for trailering. They have some really nice ones out there. I have had some messy situations with horses in stock trailers when the wraps came undone. But if it is just a short trip, the horses are healthy, get along well and are used to being trailered together; I usually don't use anything.

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/16/2006 :  9:37:48 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Do you have a 4H or pony club group close to you? Sometimes they put on clinics or just small get togethers to teach stuff like this. You could see if they would let you join in or maybe get them to start something like this. If you find an instructor they might be willing to help you. Some vets will also teach this and how to give shots and sheath cleaning and other things like that.

There are many books that show the different wraps and how to put them on but nothing beats having someone right there.

I think the worst wrap I have seen was a girl that was riding her mom's aged gelding to catch the cattle. I was shocked to see the polos she put on him all bunched down under his ankles with 'tails'. He could have stepped on them and killed them both.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  07:35:53 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
OK, the leg wraps sound more critical to know how than I'd want to mess with without one-on-one showing. I will ask farrier (who's due sometime soon) to show me.

Meanwhile, consensus seems to be that shipping boots are a whole lot easier. I will look those up because when I hear "boots" I think of Old Mac, EZ, Bell, etc. -- something that goes over hooves, not something for legs. I will ask him about those also.

Curious, however, how a bad wrap can cause bowed tendons, how LONG would that bad wrap have to stay on to cause something that serious?

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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  11:31:58 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I've hauled a horse almost 1000 miles without leg wraps and without any problems. That was from Huntington, IN to Oklahoma City, OK. I personally don't think they are necessary, but many people like them to protect their horse's legs from injury on a long trip. That trip to OKC took us about 15 or 16 hours one-way.

I've hauled horse's the length of IN and into MI several times without wraps. I thought about doing it, but I was afraid of getting them too tight. I was told it was better to forego wrapping them at all, than to do it wrong. Actually, I doubt if I'll ever wrap my horse's legs just for traveling unless the horse has some kind of leg problems to begin with.

Just my 2 cents worth.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  11:41:26 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I seldom wrapped my barrel horses when I showed in another life & never had any problems. I don't wrap Joe but seldom has he been hauled over an hour. IF we sometime make a longer trip, I might consider shipping boots especially if there was another horse in the trailer so he 1) might get stepped on and 2) couldn't move around as much.

Wrapping can be tricky and can do more harm than good so shipping boots might be an option if you feel you need to protect legs.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  12:36:43 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Just by making it too tight it can bow a tendon. The pressure on the tendons as they try to move is what causes it. It doesn't take long but it depends on how it is wrapped and what the horse was doing when it was wrapped.
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  2:31:36 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
Why not invest in some SMB boots instead? These can be used during training and trailering....I don't wrap legs when we trailer. I know how to do wraps but it takes alot of practice to get it right and frankly I haven't done it enough lately.

Shipping boots..... don't like them either! I have a pair, put them on the horse a couple of times ... but she couldn't get used to them and freaked. She'd "high step" with them on... or try to eat them off!

My boarding barn is a show barn and they've hauled horses all the way from MA to Ohio with no wraps. They very rarely wrap for shipping. I suppose they would if the horse had to be kept in the trailer for days on end but???

I wouldn't do anything unless your horse is particularily clumsy while trailering. JMHO.

<'\__~
_(( // ====

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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  7:41:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
I think leg wraps or shipping boots are a definite requirement when trailering a horse for support and for protection. It's kinda like seat belts or insurance, you never really need it until the accident and then it's too late. Seen some nasty punctures just above the hoof and they are so hard to heal.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2006 :  1:58:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
I now ALWAYS put shipping boots on my horses when trailering even just short distances. Our one horse just getting in one time knicked her cannon on the trailer and split her open pretty good, if she had had her shipping boots on it wouldn't have happened. A set of 4 cost me $12 at the auction(brand new) and only take a couple seconds each to put on. I just think its better to be safe than sorry

Dorthy Brown
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/20/2006 :  8:42:01 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
It is probably a good idea to put something on a horse's legs for protection...but I have personally never done it. I have a set of shipping boots in my tackroom cabinet that I've had for something like 25 years, and they have yet to be worn by a horse...

One thing you also need to keep in mind, is the weather. I have been told that keeping a horse's legs covered during very hot weather can cause it to become dangerously overheated in the trailer. Now, whether or not that is true, or just someone's opinion, I don't know. I think the subject was covered in one of the horse mags a few years ago.

EZ2SPOT
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 01/21/2006 :  1:07:01 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I agree that my horse's safety is always a priority with me, but I've hauled horses for over 35 years without any legs wraps or boots with no problems. Like it's already been said; It's a case of personal preference... but I doubt if I'll ever use them.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/21/2006 :  7:48:00 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

I agree that my horse's safety is always a priority with me, but I've hauled horses for over 35 years without any legs wraps or boots with no problems. Like it's already been said; It's a case of personal preference... but I doubt if I'll ever use them.



I sincerely hope your good luck continues but I would never council some one else to take the same unnecessary risk. Kinda like wearing seat belts.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Edited by - Hook on 01/21/2006 9:38:44 PM
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 01/23/2006 :  09:02:59 AM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
Ahemmm....or not wearing a helmet?

<'\__~
_(( // ====

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tinybarrels
Tenderfoot

11 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  4:15:21 PM  Show Profile  Visit tinybarrels's Homepage Send tinybarrels a Private Message
Did you ever hear that most accidents, happen within a few miles, of home ... ? I "never leave home, without 'em" .. but then, I want a sound horse, when I get there, too. Have you ever stood & rode in a trailer (without grabing, to hang on) A horse, can't grab-a-hold, to keep it's balance. Shipping boots are quick, easy & cheap .. a set of bell boots on there too, makes it even better, as you protect them from stepping on themselves. If you care about your horse ... care about his feet & legs, too. If you haul alot, learn to wrap .. Better support & protection. Always, use a quilt/no bow under, no matter wether you are using standing or polo wraps. Learn to wrap, correctly .. with the tendons. Take care of your "friend" & you'll have a sounder, happier horse.

<\___~
_//_\\_ Keepin' the Furry Side up & the Metal Side down ...
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  4:21:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
I put shipping boots on for any trip over an hour. If I'm just running over to the trailhead that's only 15 minutes away, I don't use anything. No real reason other than I'm just lazy about putting them on...that'll probably come back to bite me sometime!! PS: With shipping boots...get your horse used to the sound of Velcro being opened and closed before you start putting them on!!!

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  4:33:40 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Tiny, I was actually at Stateline night before last and looked at some shipping boots. I'm somewhat attracted to the regular shipping boots because they're super padded and really look like a snap to put on and take off. They actually had some I was meaning to ask about... they're two for $31, stiff-ish, padded, velcro closures and they go right down over the hoofs with what looked to be almost a built in bell boot, at least covering the top of the hoof.

I haven't done ANY trailering at this point, and keep hearing conflicting opinions. Some, including a friend who has rather expensive race horses, don't wrap at all. They just haven't had any problem, and trailer their horses "nekkid," head to toe. Others, like you, say you wouldn't go down the street without them.

I just checked SLT's website and I have a feeling these are the ones I was looking at...

http://tinyurl.com/bald4

Though I didn't see them there, these are also some I'd seen on their online website which looked like a pretty good deal if they'd do the job...

http://tinyurl.com/b3bmc

Any opinions on these two types? Not knowing how horses balance (but I keep being told they somehow plant their feet so they don't shift if you're at all reasonable in the driving), it just seems that IF something untoward can happen, then I think of how I'd feel if I got to a destination and Cloud backed out of the trailer with an injury. I'd feel horrible.

Open to all thoughts on the subject.

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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  4:41:11 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
If in doubt, get the shipping boots. After all, there's really no downside other than the cost to by them (not much) and the time to put them on (also not much).

Flooper

"I'm a man. I can change. If I have to. I guess."
The Man's Prayer from the Red Green Show

Edited by - FLOOPER on 01/26/2006 4:42:11 PM
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tinybarrels
Tenderfoot

11 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  5:59:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit tinybarrels's Homepage Send tinybarrels a Private Message
OnTheWay ... If someone pulls out in front of you .. wether you "hit the break or hit 'em", you are gona jostle your horse, around. I'm more comfortable, when my horse is protected. The Blue ones are an excellent/protective boot .. The other green ones, are O.K. but they are not going to protect, like the Blue Ones. It's all, a matter of preference. My husband, doesn't "boot/wrap" & he's hauled thousands of horses ... Some, have had blood-shed. I, on the other-hand, expect my horses to give me their all, when I get to my destination, so, I do everything in my power for their safety. If "we" don't win a check ... "we" can't afford to go ... It's as simple as that !

<\___~
_//_\\_ Keepin' the Furry Side up & the Metal Side down ...
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  7:47:00 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Good point Flooper about the sound of velcro, never thought of that. Either one of these boots would have it, so that's a good thing to have reminded about, thanks!

Tiny, "we" won't be winning any checks unfortunately, LOL; but hey, sure can't hurt to have some sort of leg protection just in case of an unexpectedly fast trailer brake situation. I figure either of these would be better than none, but the ones with the hoof coverings just seemed kind of neat.

Someone said the front legs (or rear) were more likely to get some sort of problem if any problems came about, which is it? And why?
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tinybarrels
Tenderfoot

11 Posts

Posted - 01/26/2006 :  8:32:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit tinybarrels's Homepage Send tinybarrels a Private Message
The front ... OnTheWay ... Esp if you have mangers, in your trailer. The back, are generally, spread wide & the front have to compensate for the heavy, head & neck. Protecting all 4 is ideal but, generally, for short hauls, it's the front that most generally, recieve the damage.

<\___~
_//_\\_ Keepin' the Furry Side up & the Metal Side down ...
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