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 Wet horse in winter -- polar fleece???
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  12:46:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
When would I use that sheet.....well I don't blanket that much but you could use it in the summer if you need to keep her dry during a rain storm. If you are out at a show or trail ride and it starts raining you can just toss it right over the saddle. If you go to a show you could put it on her and turn her out after she is dry from her bath, it will help keep her warm. Of course in all of those cases you would have check to make sure she isn't getting too warm with it. In the fall and spring you can use it when it is wet out also but may or may not need a liner for it at those times. In the winter you would need a liner and it could be used when it is so cold she is cold or in wet weather. You would need to start before the wet weather comes, no matter the season or dry her. I have had times gone out before they are too wet and just tossed a wool liner and a sheet on for about 30-40 mins and then went out and took the wool liner off if it wasn't needed(the horse should be dry by then) or changed it for a dry liner if the horse needed a liner.
If you ever have to clip her, like when I had to clip Jazz's back in the middle of a cold winter to get rid of rain rot, I had to blanket it her. If it's in the winter you will need a good liner. If she ever got hurt to the point she was going into shock toss it on her, with or with out a liner depending on the weather. It wasn't a bad buy, it's good to have at least some type of blanket on hand and if I could only pick on it would be a waterproof turn out or a turn out I could waterproof myself.

In a pinch you can use a human blanket as a liner but I would never leave a horse for any length of time like that. If it starts to slip the horse could get scared.

Wool is much better at wicking then Polar Fleece. A trip to Wal-mart can show you how different Polar Fleece can be. From thick to thin. Some is much warmer then others and a two layer fleece is extra warm. I never really thought of Polar Fleece as a wicking area since I was use to the Syn. stuff and wool. Wool is still the top for it I think but wasn't someone on here working with something else that was said to be better?

Liners are easy to make also if you can sew. They can be costly to buy and I find that I just end up adjusting the size to fit my horses. They don't come in nearly as many cuts as blankets/sheets do so finding just the right one can be hard.

Full time blanketing is a pain but you make it as painful as you want really. I know people that just stress right out about it. They have 80 blankets and worry all of the time about the weather. I'm not that stressed out about it but that might also be because the horses are in the back yard. I don't have to worry about someone else doing it or drive to swap blankets. Coal wears her blankets full time(winter) unless she is in which she hasn't been in the barn since June.


My stock trailer is black, inside and out. I was pretty mad when the guys painted it and did the inside black after I told them I wanted the inside a lighter color. The horses don't seem to mind the black inside though. It's an open stock so if you are going down the road it has a lot of air flow. I have been in it cleaning when it's hot out and I don't think it's much different then any trailer. There are many, many dark colored trailers and people use them without problem.
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sbower
Clinician



1083 Posts

Posted - 01/17/2006 :  2:19:44 PM  Show Profile Send sbower a Private Message
OTW,

Sounds like your hay is just fine, and don't feel too bad about the price, I've paid $9.00 a bale at a local feedstore! Just for my bunny thank god!

As to the gortex blanket I use them mainly for showing, to keep the rain off the saddle. And sometimes in the spring just to keep Beauty dry if I know my daughter will be riding her. I've seen people buy the bright orange ones too just to put on their horses in the fall (so no hunter mistakes them for a deer!)

I buy most of my blankets from SStack.com because I like their layering systems. They have blankets that I can put a fleece liner in ....the straps "feed through" reinforced leather holes in the fleece. I also like them because I've got a heftier quarter horse and their sizes are generous.

As to fleece, I use it as a cooler, and as a lightweight show sheet to keep the dust off. If you do sew, you are right next to an outlet for Malden Mills (best fleece available) in Lawrence Ma. MUCH better quality than the ave horse blanket. Beauty has a cooler right now made of fleece that has these cute little penguins marching all over it!

Unless you are clipping your horse to get into the show season faster, you aren't going to need any thing but a medium weight waterproof blanket with a fleece liner for the extra cold days. JMHO...especially, if cloud is inside at night. Here in the Northeast we tend to blanket more than is necessary, I think. All the horses in our boarding barn are blanketed most of the winter.

I really haven't said anything different from Stormie, except that I love the good quality fleece, just in terms of care it's much better than wool IMHO.

<'\__~
_(( // ====

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2006 :  08:03:01 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Stormie

When would I use that sheet.....well I don't blanket that much but...........
<SNIP>


Stormie, thanks a LOT, the light bulb begins to come on. There are SO many areas in horse-world where simple terminology can be really misleading on the face of it, and be very confusing. "Sheet" is one of those. Sounds like I ought to just think of that gortex sheet in the context of an unlined raincoat for humans. You'd not want to put it on over wet human clothing (wet horse) or you'd start freezing underneath it. At the same time, it would be a plus before-the-fact of rain or sleet to keep dry in the first place. May also be good, temporarily and watched with care, as a cover-all with a for trailering because it's a windblock, but not long enough to trap moisture in. So I'm just going to think of it as an unlined raincoat/wind block, and treat it the same as I would want same on me.

The main recommendation I've heard about fleece was a woman at Stateline who said she loves their own fleece "thing" (don't know if they call it a sheet, liner or blanket) which she said wicks moisture away fast and dries a horse in a half hour. Otherwise, haven't heard that much raving about fleece. Susan, for instance, said she just never liked fleece at all, she uses wool for wicking (I assume light layer) and a few on this board seem to feel the same. And you're right, there are WAY too many kinds of fleece. Some is very warm, some isn't. Some seems absorbent and yet other kinds wouldn't wick at all. (I have a vest that water just beads up and rolls off of, it's the ultimate in "synthetic" properties and doesn't seem to get wet no matter what. Will reconsider that one.

DARK PAINTED TRAILER: VERY glad to hear you haven't had much problem with dark trailer becoming an oven. Fortunately this one has back doors you can leave open for air circulation as well as screened windows on each side (not huge but there).

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2006 :  09:15:45 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
SB and PG...
It's amazing the hay price differences between here and other areas. However when comparing (and I know ours are high by comparison no matter what), I ALWAYS get frustrated with the prices "per bale" that are quoted. No one ever seems to define what SIZE bale they're talking about. Like all bales are the same.

What really brought this home is that there is a woman in my area who I originally met as a potential riding partner. All excited, she asked if I wanted to go in with her on a truckload of hay. "Only $4.80 per bale!!" Well, that sounded great compared to what I was paying. So at first I said yes. However just by luck, I was running out before it was ordered. She dropped off four bales to hold me over. These bales were MUCH smaller. I had no problem lifting them. Also, they were sooooo loosely wrapped, if you didn't lift them just right they'd fall apart. (Not only loosely wrapped with twine but the hay itself was loosely baled.) Stacking would be a tad tricky to be polite.

Suddenly dawning on me, I brought out a scale, and they weighed 30 or 35 lbs... a little math, and I'd have been paying a little more for hay with these than buying from my grain store, and these were not "delivered and stacked" either.

I decided to pass. She was ordering anyway, but all insulted, she could not get over why I'd turn down $4.80 "per bale" in favor of $7.53 "per bale." (The weight difference didn't faze her, it's like that wasn't a factor. "PER BALE" was all she could grasp. And dadgummit, $4.80 is a lot less than $7.53, any dang fool could see that.)

However I'm sure that in some parts of the country equivalent weight AND comparable quality bales are a whole lot cheaper than here. Can't do much about it. Next summer I'll check out local hay prices (this is Canadian). But until then, that's what we've got to work with. ;-)


Edited by - OnTheWay on 01/18/2006 09:20:35 AM
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2006 :  10:29:52 AM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I haven't weighed my bales but they have to be 60-65lbs at least. I'm sure hay is much more plentiful here; therefore, cheaper. Farmers usually get at least 2 cuttings/year and many times 3.

After thinking about it (too lazy to look up the records) I think I probably paid 2.50/bale instead of 2.00. The second load of hay came from a different guy & later in the year after deisel prices had gone up. I expect to pay even more this year because deisel prices have continued to climb and I know the farmers have to pass that increase on.


Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2006 :  2:30:43 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message
That brings up a good point... we should be feeding hay by weight, not by 'bales'. The rule of thumb of 2% of body weight a day (1000# horse X 0.02 = 20# hay/day) is based on weight. Depending on the hay, that could be 2/3 of a bale, or 1/3 of a bale a day. I know we get into the habit of just feeding a certain part of a bale, like 1/3 bale a day, because it's quick and easy, and usually all the bales in a certain load end up about equal. I've been thinking about getting a scale, in order to feed more acurately, and not waste expensive hay. Does anybody have suggestions on a scale? How about a fisherman's scale where you could hang the bale from it?
Maybe I should have started a separate topic with this?

"You learn a thing a day, you store up smart" - Festus Haggen

"A manís soul canít be hidden,
From the creatures in his care." -
Hard Candy Cowboy by Debra Meyer



Edited by - hmeyer on 01/18/2006 2:33:02 PM
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/18/2006 :  11:10:18 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by hmeyer

That brings up a good point... we should be feeding hay by weight, not by 'bales'. The rule of thumb of 2% of body weight a day (1000# horse X 0.02 = 20# hay/day) is based on weight. Depending on the hay, that could be 2/3 of a bale, or 1/3 of a bale a day. I know we get into the habit of just feeding a certain part of a bale, like 1/3 bale a day, because it's quick and easy, and usually all the bales in a certain load end up about equal. I've been thinking about getting a scale, in order to feed more acurately, and not waste expensive hay. Does anybody have suggestions on a scale? How about a fisherman's scale where you could hang the bale from it?
Maybe I should have started a separate topic with this?




HM, I keep a scale out in the barn, and I always weigh Cloud's hay. This stuff is super condensed, and sometimes I'll get a thinner flake and think it'll be less. It'll weigh 5 lbs. Other times I'll get a thicker one and figure it'll weigh more, it'll weigh 5 lbs. So since I don't seem to have my "feel" down very well, I simply weigh it. Mine has a platform you stand on with a long neck that goes from the floor platform all the way up to about waist high. It's a very good scale, and convenient because that platform is big enough to plop and stack flakes of hay on. I can also JUST fit a 15-gallon water bucket onto it (enough so it won't fall off). That's very convenient also since sometimes I put extra hay in it if splitting a flake. Bucket weighs 3 lbs. I do like knowing how much my horse is getting beyond guesses.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/19/2006 :  12:02:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I have a hanging scale that is like a fisherman's scale but I got it at Fleet Farm. It weighs up to 25lbs I think. Since at the most I would be weighting about 20 lbs I don't need anything to handle a whole bale. Personally I think it's just better to weight out what you need then weigh each bale unless you are feeding a number of bales at a time. Plus we use round bales so weighing one of them is not really and option! lol But even then I don't weigh out 20 lbs. I'll check myself for 5lb size since I am feeding two horses. AM 5lbs each, Lunch 5 lbs each and PM 10 lbs each. I can guess at with the 5 lbs. For grain I do kind of the same thing. I figure out how much one lb is(SafeChoice is 3 cups per lb) and then go from there. At each meal Coal gets 4 cups, Jazz gets 5 cups. So total they get 4 and 5 lbs of grain a day. I just find that easier because then if I need to alter something like add extra hay because of the cold I have a pretty good guess what I need without reweighing it.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/19/2006 :  12:05:11 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I should add that for grain I use an icecream bucket and for hay I use a hay net. I can reset the scale for different things if I need so that with the bucket on there one lb of grain will read one lb on the scale. The scale reads at 1/2lbs. I also have a small one that I can do supplements on. It goes up to one lb.
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/19/2006 :  05:42:33 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
We feed our horses Timothy / grass 4 times a day and grain night and morning. If I feed too much hay, there is hay left over between feeding and I cut them back next time. I monitor their condition to make sure they are not getting fat and add or subract the grain / ration balancer to maintain weight. Can't see weighing every time for each horse. Worked well for me for me over the years. We do weigh the grain and know exactly how much our size can, can hold. Use the can determine the right weight.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson

Edited by - Hook on 01/19/2006 05:46:04 AM
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