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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  06:18:51 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Here comes OTW with more questions...

My "new-to-me" trailer has now been purchased! Yeeeee-haw!!

Once it's here, I would like to outfit it with whatever one needs for just spur-of-moment 2-hour trail riding jaunts. (Things that would likely live in the trailer all the time).

Things that come to mind might be porta-potty, water buckets, leads, ropes, ties, first aid (???)

Also any nifty ways you've discovered thru trial and error to store these things that live in the trailer?

This is a 2H straight load with walkway in front. (Assuming the 2nd stall is available for "stuff," stalls have wood up to about waist high, then metal above. Walkway is all metal in case people use hooks in nifty ways.

My goal is to be able to decide, last minute, to take off for several hours and have as much as possible either already in the trailer or ready to go/easy to pack.

ANY tips would be great, including even the best way you've found to keep/transport tack.



Edited by - OnTheWay on 01/07/2006 06:23:44 AM

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  07:26:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
BTW Make sure that you consult with the members of HAA. Ee don't want you to get over loaded with just neat stuff. Just Practical neat stuff.
Our trailer is a gooseneck with dressing room with cupboards that Mrs. Hook designed specifically for the show things. My suggestion is to take a room of your house and set out all the things you think you could possibly use on the trail. Sort out "the can't live without" and see how nuch you end up with, then cut it down some more. Do the same with your horse stuff but think spare equipment, ropes, halters etc. and First aid. Review what you have available and see how you can make it more compact.

My thought is that when you see everything you want, ( want not need), it will result in needing a truck cap for the "Old Grey Mare". Hmmm - addiction --better confess to Flooper before you get in any deeper:)

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  07:57:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
How about a grooming kit? I keep a second set of brushes, hoof pick, sponge, sweat scraper, etc. in my trailer. These items don't cost much, and it sure saves time to keep them in the trailer.

I've also found that one of those little hoses that coils up, along with a spray head, to be handy, & keep one of those in the trailer during trail riding season. Like Hook says, be sure to confess to Flooper....

EZ2SPOT
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  08:43:24 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Hook, don't laugh but I'm seriously thinking of selling my NEWLY PURCHASED camper. Arrrrrgh! Seriously, I bought it in June and used it once. I can no longer see why anyone would just go sit in a campground if a horse and trailer is available. (Wasn't too sure about it on my one and only 2-night venture either, and it was a really great campground!) But then I could buy a gooseneck and sleep in the thing, lol! Seriously, I just don't think I'll get use out of it (the camper).

Old Grey Mare driver's door has no lock. Hook, a truck cap sounds great but $$$ into OGM I'm avoiding. I'm therefore wondering about one of those waffle-patterned metal lock boxes I see in back of pickups. Are those bolted in? Are they expensive? And where would I get one?

EZ, grooming kit, great idea, but that brings me to a question. For just going to local trails (under 7 miles) I thought I'd just tack Cloud up at home, load her in trailer "tacked," and then when returning (probably 2-1/2-3 hours later) untack her again here at home. Is there anything wrong with doing that? And would I bring horse water just on those short jaunts? It would seem so but maybe not if it's just that far.

What first aid items do you stock in trailer?

Can't WAIT to get trailer here to play with it! Since OGM needs brake controller and matching electric-connector plug (has wrong type for trailer), that can't happen until the 16th. Trailer place is half way between my house and where trailer is.

Update, I got the trailer for $1,000! It's a really a solid little dude and in great, great, GREAT condition. Not much rust and none structural. I super much like that it was a one owner, and a compulsive-cleaning female who stripped mats after every use and swept, etc. I think it was a really good deal.
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Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  09:27:42 AM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Uuummmm.....PG has a SUPER list for take-along items.....it's probably archived somewhere....or we can maybe convince her to add it here again!

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  09:42:23 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Saddletramp

Uuummmm.....PG has a SUPER list for take-along items.....it's probably archived somewhere....or we can maybe convince her to add it here again!



Oooooo, that would be GREAT! I had a feeling someone might have one. And I'm sure there are things on it that a newbie wouldn't think of and maybe even some oldies!
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Budman
Advanced Rider



USA
230 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  10:11:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Budman's Homepage Send Budman a Private Message
If you take all the things on PG's list you better get ready to buy a bigger trailer. Oh, and a 1 ton diesel PU to pull it with!
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Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  10:45:24 AM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
LISTS... LISTS.. I love to make lists!!!

If anyone looks at this list and says of course it's done like, what do you think I am a dummy? No not at all please don't take offence. Most of this is what Mr.. Parrot and I had to learn the hard way.

1) Haul your horse on the driver side if possible. Helps keep weight in the center of the road and the trailer off the curve of the road.

2) Prop stuff off the floor. Ours urinate and poop in the trailer. This keeps the urine away from your hay. OR put the hay in the tack compartment or back of truck.

3) Extend the center divider to the floor if possible or bungee cord all stuff to the wall. Keeps stuff in place and less chance to roll around horses legs

4) Place lots of hooks along the top front edge of trailer. You can hang gobs of stuff up there. Rain gear, hay nets, bridles, ropes, even the water bucket, and the list can go on and on. Run a bungee cord across all this stuff after packing, to keep it all in place. If it were not for bungee cords, Mr. Parrot would have to tow another trailer behind the horse trailer to haul his stuff.

5) depending on the weather the saddle can go in back of the truck or on a rack placed in the front of the side the horse is not using.

6) Keep gallon jugs of ice in the freezer to pop in the cooler.

7) I would haul water if there is none. See the kewl water tank/saddle rack combos?

8) I see horses hauled in full tack all the time. More in the south and out west than here. I would leave bridle off till ya get there.

Do you have plenty of catalogs full of the neat gotta have it all horse stuff. State line tack, Valley Vet, Jeffers, if not we can help you out.

Have fun. You will rearrange your stuff a zillion times before you get it to work for you. It's fun, kinda like rearranging the furniture and not near so heavy.

Halter, leadrope, brushes, combs, fly spray, Hoof pick,(a lot of this stuff can go in a 5 gal bucket with one those canvas pocket thingies that fits around the edge)Hay Net, Water Bucket, FIRST AID KIT, Wood, Fire starter, Hay, Horse Blanket, Reins, Leather Repair Kit.

Looks like a lot, but doesn't really take up much space.

Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  11:18:34 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
I, too, have seen horses hauled with saddles, but remember reading somewhere that it is not a good idea, for safety reasons. As I recall, the issues were saddles getting hung up on something, or making it more difficult to get the horse out of the trailer in case of an accident. My advise would be to not do it; you could have the horse groomed & ready, and it would only take a few minutes to get the saddle on at the trailhead.

First aid kits...wow, some people carry needles & thread for wounds...but what I take is just very basic, just saline solution, wound ointment, wound pads, and leg wraps. Anything else, I figure I would need a vet to deal with it, anyway! I would be interested in knowing what others take along with them...

EZ2SPOT
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  12:27:58 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Parrot, I like lists also. You don't have to take it ALL with, but it's great to have all the possible options written down for reference. I'm also a hook/hang person because when there ain't much floor space there's always wall space and with a little inginuity...

BUT entire walkway is metal and so are stalls above the wood. Stick-um hooks aren't very reliable seeming though they may be on metal. Would you (do you) bore a hole through metal <eeeeek!> of a trailer for hooks or other wall mounted things? Trailer is an extra tall/wide so though the walkway is just that (no extra room) there's height. I'm not at all above rigging stuff to hooks, but advice regarding drilling holes seems like a good idea. It's a 1989 Valley "steel, not aluminum" so does that mean the interior walls are steel? Is it okay to drill hooks/wall mounts in it? Would that go through to outside? I don't know how these things are constructed, whether there's space between what I'm seeing inside and the outside skin or ???

Wood I can do anything with. Metal I'm not very versed in.

EZ, first aid kit like that sounds about right and I don't think I'd be whip-stitching a horse too readily either. Vet time! ;-)

What about blanket for trailering? I"m not blanketing Cloud for winter at all. Do I need a type of blanket for trailering? What about after riding if it's cold or chilly out. Even if she doesn't have any sweat built up (probably wouldn't), the minute you take saddle off, there's likely to be some under where the saddle was.

Printing out Parrot's list. Would LOVE to see PG's also.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  12:45:32 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Parrot, no I'm sure not saying "whatcha think I am a dummy?" Nothing's obvious until you SEE it.
For instance, for some reason I assumed (assoooooomed) pee would stay on her side (didn't look at the divider). How do you get the divider lower than it goes, add something to it?

**** The water tank / saddle rack combo -- wuzzzatt? Where I see it? Is it meant for trailers or just a nifty thingie? I have a Valley Vet catalog, and I think one other. That's about it. I should be re-visiting that for nifty stuff (I'm a sucker for nifty stuff.)

Now when you GO trail riding, assuming you don't have saddle bags, etc., what do you tend to "fashion" to put your stuff in?
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Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  1:03:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Parrothead! Great list!

The only things that I can add are to #3...altho it makes sense to extend the divider to the floor in order to "protect" misc. stuff in the other stall....keep in mind that some horses prefer to brace with their legs a bit further apart, so I keep looking at my trailer and wanting to shorten the divider to give them that extra space. a divider to the floor greatly resticts the horses that brace with a wider stance.

And #8 from my own experience...I will never haul in full tack, nor saddled only, not even a half mile down the road. Hauled one in a light blanket once and as he was backing out of the trailer, the blanket got caught on the pin for the butt bar. He panicked and flew backwards, stripping the blanket off and over his head (like us taking off a turtle-neck sweater) where it wedged up tight around his head and forelegs. Literally had to cut the blanket off of him. We were lucky in that it wasn't worse, and all that was damaged was a replaceable blanket.

But I do LOVE the rest of the list!!! I'm still waiting for a reprint of PG's too! Anyone got it??


-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  1:36:08 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I compiled a rather lengthy list of items one needs to have for trail riding a while back. I posed this same question to the email list associated with the Indiana Trail Riders Assn. and listed EVERYTHING that was suggested. It is *slightly* over the top but you can pick & choose from the list depending on where you ride & how long you'll be out. I'll see if I can find either the thread or list & post it.

I keep a frozen water bottle in the freezer ready to go (for summer rides) & I try to keep little packs of crackers or some trail mix on hand.

Depending on the weather & availablity of water on the trail, you may need to take your own water so Cloud can have a drink when you get back to the trailer. I have a 5 gal plastic jug I take along.

You'll need fly spray to apply before you take off. I put it on after Joe is saddled so it's not under the saddle or girth. I also keep a soaked rag in a plastic bag in my saddle bags to "freshen up" at lunch. I usually wipe his face, chest & lower legs then. I also have something that I've NEVER seen anyone else use on the trail but I absolutely love it. It's a fly whisk that I found online a couple of years ago. It was only about $10 so I figured if I didn't like it, I didn't have that much invested in it. I've never seen them at that price again & I'm kicking myself for not getting another. It's SO handy!

If you're like me, a absolutely MUST item is a spider knocker. Spiders tend to gravitate to the trees that line trails & build webs out of 25lb fishing line at face level. Before the fly whisk, I'd have to get a branch to wave around as we went down the trail, now I just use the fly whisk!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  2:43:20 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I don't know if you're wondering about the frozen water bottles, but if you take one with you on a hot day, it'll melt gradually and you'll have ice water to drink for the ride. Also, it can act as an ice pack to keep certain foods cool until you're ready to eat.

I like using a cantle bag and horn bags for carrying my stuff. I usually stuff a lead rope, among other things, into the cantle bag, and put my large water bottle in one of the horn bags, so it's right in front of me and in easy reach. The other horn bag I use as my horsey purse for my truck keys, billfold & ID, digi camera, etc. Some riders frown on carrying this on your horse for the simple fact that if your horse gets rid of you and takes off, there goes everything right along with him! Many of them wear fanny packs for this purpose. But so far, I've never had this happen (knocking on wood). I usually let my horse wear a halter under the bridle. The halter and the lead in the cantle bag is just in case something should happen and I'd have to tether my horse somewhere... say like a potty break.

I also carry a rain poncho, a hoof pick, and sometimes flyspray in my cantle bag. Snacks & edibles will usually fit in my horn bag along with my other stuff. And don't forget a helmet!

I agree with Saddle and EZ about hauling a horse with a saddle on. It's been my observation that if a horse can find a way to cause an accident, he'll do it. I just feel like a horse wearing a saddle in a trailer is this accident ready to happen. Many people around here do it for short trips, but, to me, if it can happen over a long trip, it can happen on a shorter one. I just feel safer saddling up my horse after I've arrived.

Another thing you might run into is Cloud may not drink the water if a hydrant is available at the trail head. Many horses don't like the smell or taste of strange water. Then there are the ones that will drink anything that's put in front of them. It really depends on the horse. Some horses will get plenty of water if there are numerous creek crossings along the trail.

Can't think of anything else, so that's all for now.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  2:52:56 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Found the list I mentioned earlier.

**WARNING*** It's not necessary to take everything with you on an hour ride!

antibiotic salve for horse
*aspirin
Banamine (syringe & needle if injectable)
*bandaids/sterile pads
bandana (hankerchief, cover from sun, bandange, washcloth, tiedown….)
big sewing needle
black electric tape or duct tape (tack repairs, secure bandages, can be used as a tourniquet)
bug spray
candle
cash (bills & change)
cellphone (but signals aren't dependable)
chapstick
chicago screws (tack repair)
compass (GPS works too!)
disposable diaper or bandages (for injuries to horse)
dryer lint (to start a fire)
easy boot
emergency blanket #1 (foil type- to use as a cover)
emergency blanket #2 (or other waterproof layer to sit on)
emergency contact list
extra curb chain
extra day of any prescribed medication
extra pair of socks
first aid kit
*first aid wipes
fishing line
food/snacks (emergency foods that don't spoil quickly: crackers, cookies, protein bars,etc)
garbage bag (for cover in rain or to collect garbage)
hand wipes or sanitizer
hiking shoes or comfotable riding shoes/boots (in case you have to walk)
hoof pick
identification (both for you & your horse)
insect spray for horses
knife (Swiss, Leatherman or pocket)
latigo string
light sticks
map of area
marking tape (to guide the way back if someone has to go for help)
notepad & pencil (ink freezes)
orange vest
rain poncho
safety pins
shoe lace
small flashlight & extra batteries
sun tan lotion
*topical antihistamine ointment (insect bites, bee stings)
travel roll of toilet paper
*triple anitibiotic salve
*tums
tweezers (removing ticks)
water
water purification tablets
waterproof matches
whistle (worn around your neck)
wire cutters

* items in first aid kit

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  5:16:05 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Wow, Karen, great list! Thanks for posting!

Now Karen, about that fly whisk. I don't know if we have that many flies in our woods in NH, but I'd bet it would sure make one impressive showing to the horse. (Now we're talking "partnership" if each of us has a horsehair tail to swish, lol.) So you carry this with you while trail riding, eh? I'm thinking that would probably beat swinging a rope. But I admit to wondering about these cobwebs you mention. I wasn't aware of those but if you use the whisk for them, doesn't it get pretty sticky-gunky pretty fast?

Ticks. Oh so easy to forget about these little babies in winter! Well, I used to be terrified just at the sight of one, but I got over it when I had to pull one out of my shin this past fall. I got a classic Lyme rash from the little turkey under a week later and went to doctor. She caught it with an aggressive course of antibiotics which you can do if you get it fast. I did walk a short way up a trail someone told me about though, just about 300 feet into it. Well, I found lots of ticks on my pant legs. Teeeeensy ones (probably deer ticks). So I'm sure hoping it was the light rain that brought them out, and that it's not that bad all the time in woods. You can spray horse, but how in the world can you ever check for ticks all over a horse? Such teensy little things and so much horse!

The story about catching blanket on divider in trailer... now that wasn't a pretty picture. Someone said *always* have a blanket on horse in trailer coming back from rides (or in winter) because trailers get very drafty en route. (???) I don't even own one since Cloud is handling our winter amazingly well but I was going to ask about blanketing in trailer. So general advice is "nekkid" except for halter I take it.

Great info, suggestions and lists!


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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  6:19:56 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
But I admit to wondering about these cobwebs you mention. I wasn't aware of those but if you use the whisk for them, doesn't it get pretty sticky-gunky pretty fast?



It's not too bad, I just flick it hard & the arachnids sail off. Webs can be scraped off on branches!

Ticks are horrible here in the spring & summer. It seems "tick season" gets longer & longer each year. Ticks will get on horses too but in the summer it's not too hard to check for them. I've been bitten more times than I can count.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  6:38:14 PM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message
PG---Love the wisk. I wished for something like all summer until we found the neatest fly bonet. Our horses looked like "sissies" and we got a ton of strange looks with them but, IMO, they were worth every penny. Here's the link http://tinyurl.com/8mfyd These things are the greatest! After not worrying about deer flies around the ears and eyes, we came across yet another annoyance. Horse flies landing on the rump. Now Deuce will warn me that they are there and if I don't get it fast enough, he will hop a little to get it off! We rode back to camp and saw a couple of girls with a white T-shirt tied to the back of their saddles, covering the rump area! Since, I've seen a product called a rump pad for the purpose of keeping flies off. What a nifty idea! We endured snickers with the bonnets and endurance saddles, so we figure something over the rump would just add to the list! BUT...the horses were comfortable and they didn't care who laughed!
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  6:45:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Mrs. Hook reccommends the use of rubbermaid containers to store stuff. Can be used in the trailer or the back of the truck and are waterproof.

I like the list too.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  7:03:54 PM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
Now that I think about it OTW, I take back the hooks everywhere idea for the first year. We had/have a dressing room in front and the screws just went into there. We did put some metal backer in for strength.

Does your trailer have managers? We used to feed a bit of hay just to give them something to do when we had managers, but hay nets in the trailer (while moving) are not usually a good idea. I watched one gal cut her hay net off her horses leg when they arrived. I hate to think of the possibilities if the horse had not been a calm one.

If you are riding with a buddy it's good to let them go first. Cobweb collectors!!

Water tank is here, but there are others.
http://tinyurl.com/dlj7v

Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
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EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  8:02:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
Another thing I saw on a trail ride to remove cobwebs was someone using just a plain old fly swatter. Seemed to work great.

I agree with Mrs. Hook; keeping things in rubbermaid containers does help not only to keep everything organized, but also easier to move in & out of your truck or trailer before & after camping, etc. I have one huge plastic container that holds all my horse gear except for the saddle & hay. Another holds my cooking stove & kitchen gear. Have yet another for food...and so on.

OTW, it is really hard to tell somebody what to take, because it depends on where you are going , for how long, how far away, and the personal needs of you & the horse. Here is what I consider to be the bare minimum for a day ride:

Tack (saddle, bridle, saddle pad, whatever else you use)
Pommel bag (and cantle bag, depending upon length of ride)
Halter & lead, plus an extra of each
Grooming kit (brushes, hoof pick)
Fly spray for horse & human
Pocket knife(keep it with you at all times!)
Hay
Water bucket and 5-gallon water can, filled if destination has no water)
Mounting block
Water bottle for me & some snacks
Rain gear if there is a possibility of needing it (and you never know!)

EZ2SPOT
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  8:22:03 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Water tank link just brought me to their home page with index. Is this something for trailer? Couldn't find one that looked like it was.

Hooks on walls: I was thinking... maybe a bit hesitant to punch hooks in through metal, however somewhere I have a roll of "serious" 2-sided sticky tape. As I recall it will hold a lot of weight and is hard to get off once on. A friend's husband was a grip at MGM or somewhere and they used it for all sorts of stuff. That (assuming it still has life) might be a better way to start until/unless I'm sure of placement. But every suggestion here is giving me info and ideas!

No, Parrot, trailer doesn't have mangers. From back to front is just 2 stalls, side by side with center divider (removeable). Breast bars at front of stalls, and then beyond that is just a walkway. There is a big D ring type hook at the top of the floor-to-ceiling center bar that the breast bars come off of. Seller said she hung hay bag from there, but tied it in a way so it was stable against the post. I'm sure horse could also reach it if hung on the front wall of the walkway, walkway isn't too wide as I recall. I think if really securely tied (and anchored down so it's not a "bobbing-for-apples" kind of thing) a hay net may be fine in this configuration. I'm also really hinky about them being anywhere they could become a tangle though.

Hook, the tupperware idea is a good one. I'm currently trying to think of some neat slatted type riser for other stall's floor so that if urine doesn't get absorbed in Cloud's stall and runs over, it couldn't touch whatever may be stored there. The trailer has mats, but I don't know what happens when you dump a gallon of liquid on them. Do you put shavings in horse trailer stalls? Seems like a pretty good layer would absorb any problems so it doesn't run. These are all details I just don't know yet, but it sure would be nice to have that 2nd stall for storage.

When we trailered Cloud here from her prior home, we had 15 bails of hay stacked in the 2nd stall. Now that we're talking about it I have no clue how (or even that) they protected it from possible seepage. It wasn't a long trip (about 45 minutes) but it wouldn't have taken much, doesn't seem.

Since this trailer is pretty tall, I'm thinking a hammock type storage thing could be good, screwed into the wood on the side of the 2nd stall. Good sized and carefully inserted wood screws could be screwed all the way in (or eased out) temporarily in case a guest horse comes along, but a right sized hammock affair, say with some elasticized "give" to the front edge could hold a lot of stuff and be well off the floor with contents pretty easily reachable and readibly visible through the netting. Also, now thinking, recycle-able ice chests on the floor could get funky on the outside but keep contents pristine, and washed/sanitized outside with bleach and hose.

More possibilities than I thought.

Anyone want to buy a brand new (used once) Starcraft Centennial 3606?? Full screen room with privacy/storm panels is still in the box. Seriously thinking of selling it. Kind of sad, but am really doubting I'll be putting it to use originally planned, lol. Hey, get a horse in the picture and everything changes.
Carol
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 01/07/2006 :  10:03:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
We always use shavings in our trailer under the horses. We also blanket in the trailer if required for warmth or to prevent a chill if the horse is damp. Just make sure you have vetted the trailer to make sure that there is no place for a blanket to get caught on the way in or out. We never tie the horse either until the butt bar ( or partition if a slant load) is in place to prevent a panic pull back. Make sure your ties have quick release snap with the quick release fastened to the trailer. I like the quick release to be in a place where I can get at it regardless what the horse's head is doing during a panic.

We also Always tote our own water to the shows. Makes for a happier horse.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2006 :  06:47:15 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Great advice, tips, and things to consider, and some I hadn't!! Sure is nice to know experienced horse people!

I would normally put the butt bar in place immediately when she's in. Trailer tie has quick release snap, would never use anything else, and in case of emergency, the tie hook is right at the escape door entrance, easy to reach.

EZ, I also use big huge plastic bins w/lids for taking stuff anywhere not involving public transportation, dang those things are convenient. And they stack.

Becca, I looked at the crocheted head fly protector, sounds like a great idea but it appears to only go down over the forehead, what about the rest of horse's face? Love the idea but am ever so curious about that.

I got a fly spray that came well-recommended ($22 a bottle as I recall). The one I'd had before only worked about 5 hours, if that. Then the flies appeared to like it for dessert. This one SAYS several days, but it does seem to work all day. For face, I bought a very small "natural" sponge that has different size/shaped sides. I use it just for fly spray to dab on Cloud's face, it seemed to work. But I'm ever so curious about that amusing little doily thingie. Cloud doesn't seem hinky about her ears and what a crummy place to have flies.

EZ, I also need a mounting aid but just use a turned over sturdy bucket. The ONLY time I had to dismount "out there" (so far) was on my very first ride on Cloud the day after I got her. We went all through the neighborhood early morning, discovered the dirt road whereupon we tried out her canter for the first time, then continued into adjoining town neighborhoods. Suddenly I discovered my cell phone was missing (awwwk?) Hope upon hope, I went back to the dirt road, and sure nuff, it had bounced out of my pocket onto the road but fortunately still in one piece and hadn't been run over yet. The only place to re-mount there was by leading Cloud into a ditch so she was lower, but hey, at least she was cooperative. :-D


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beccajane
Trainer



USA
985 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2006 :  2:21:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit beccajane's Homepage Send beccajane a Private Message
OTW...This is just something we use while riding. The deer flies here land behind the ears, on the ears and around the eyes and all of these are covered with this handy little "thingy". The fringe keeps the flies away from the eye area. They don't seem to bether the rest of the face. It sure stopped the head tossing and fretting cause by the flies. Then we had horse flies on the rump!!! The T-shirt idea looked like it might be a solution!
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 01/08/2006 :  2:44:56 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
I bought a rump rug at MTR last year & have used it a couple of times. It works!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe Paint Gelding
Paoli, IN


"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
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