Daily Equine Forum Visit Horse Saddle Shop Read Horse Saddle Shops Blog Horse Saddle Shop Twitter Horse Saddle Shop Facebook Image Map
Daily Equine Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics |Recent Messages | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Caring and Owning Horses
 Horse Training
 The "Time" Factor
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  2:30:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
Scroll back 37 years or so to when I was 13 and got my first horse...

A mustang mare around 15 years or so. Turned out she'd been drugged when we bought her; I later had someone tell me they had known the former owners, and nobody had been able to ride the horse, so they'd just used her as a brood mare until divorce forced a sale.

Problems...where to start??? Rhumba reared or bolted at the slightest provocation, spooked at everything, went berserk whenever she saw a saddle...was reasonably easy to bridle, but would freak out when you tried to take it off (probably had someone bang her teeth with the bit in the past). She would pull back when tied, to the point where the only think you could be sure would hold her was a large tree trunk or a very heavy pole. To top it off, she was nearly impossible to catch. Not a good horse for a beginner, or anyone else, for that matter! About a month after I got her, she apparently reared over backwards on me, and I spent some time in the hospital...

Fast forward 2 years later...horse could be ridden by anyone, was easy to catch and tack up, was shown in barrels & poles, had been on one competitive trail ride & placed 4th, and had started jumping. Gee, I was a pretty hot trainer, huh?

Actually, no. I was totally new to horses, and the only thing I had going for me was...TIME!! As a kid with no major responsibilities and nothing much else to do, it was easy for me to spend a lot of time with this horse; after school, weekends, and all day, every day, during the summer. And that time with her was what made all the difference. Not any magical training methods.

Oh, boy, how I would like to be able to make as much progress with the horses I have now, as I did with my first one! Seems like I know more now, but am accomplishing less...

Of course, there is no way to turn back the clock...I now have home, family, work, and other responsibilities...but my resolution this year is to spend more time with my horses, even if that time is not spent riding!!!

No wonder we have elevated trainers such as John Lyons, Pat Parelli, Clinton Anderson, etc., to celebrity status (well, actually, they seem to be regarded more as gods!)...I think we are all looking for ways to communicate with & control our horses...but are stressed for time & hoping for shortcuts & magic bullets. Have a feeling that in the long run, we will learn there is no substitute for just plain being with a horse!

EZ2SPOT

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  3:19:53 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I couldn't agree more, EZ. Time is the deciding factor in molding a horse into what you want. It doesn't happen overnight and sometimes takes years.

When I bought Wimpy, she had wire cut all over her body with most of them right between the ears. She was 5 years old and hadn't been ridden for the past 2 years. In other words, she'd just gotten a good start under saddle and then left. She saddled & bridled no problem and rode okay for just a horse to ride and fool around with. The problem? You'd be leading her along and then the next minute you had to let go of the lead or be dragged. Sometimes she'd take off like she'd been shot out of a cannon. She loaded terrible into a trailer and usually took at lest 3 people to get her in. It took over a year to teach her to trust me and fix these problems, and I had no idea what I was doing at the time. She was a fantastic trail horse, won many English pleasure classes, and was a fairly decent gaming horse. She sure was an education and I had her for 18 years.

I bought Warrior as a yearling, and he was the first horse I broke to saddle by myself. He was so laid back, it was like he'd done it all before. It was like he was saying, "Oh, you want to put that thing on my back? Sure, go ahead. It's not hurting me. No big deal." Same way when I mounted him for the first time. He just took everything in stride. Was he a great show horse? No, but he wasn't too shabby on trails and anyone could ride him.

W.T. was next, and he was one hard critter when it came to saddle training. Walking & trotting were fine. So was turning, stopping and even backing. But teaching him to canter was a whole 'nuther ball game. I don't think I've ever rode a horse that bucked harder or longer than he did every time in asked him to canter during his 2 year old year. I'd cue him to canter, he'd do it for 2 or 3 strides, then the head went down and the rear came up. I'd hang on as long as I could, and about the time I thought I couldn't hang on any longer, he'd quit. This went on for a year! I had people tell me to get rid of him, and he was way too much horse for me to handle... or to send him to a pro trainer. But I just kept on, and he finally got over his bucking... but it took a whole year to do it. He turned into a regional and national level show horse and would do gaming classes, pleasure driving, halter, and hunt seat pleasure all in the same day. Not bad for a horse that was going to do me serious harm and was too much horse for me.

Dove was by far the worst acter I ever owned when I bought him. He was a December 2 year stallion and it took 3 husky men to literally throw him into my trailer and slam the doors shut on him. He proceeded to lift all 4 trailer tires a good foot off the ground with his temper tantrum, and almost succeeded in lift my truck as well. My first thoughts were, "Oh my! What have I gotten myself into?" I was riding him as a 3 year old (We gelded him 2 weeks after bringing him home), but didn't show him under saddle until September of that year. It was at least 2 years before I felt I could let my guard down when riding him and not have him act like an idiot. Was it worth it? Well, he's standing out by the barn right now and is my lesson horse in introducing children to horse back riding for the first time. He was also a champion regional show horse, and is a wonderful trail horse... just as long as no deer pop up unexpectedly. He's been helping me teach others to ride for the last 5 years. Oh yeah, he'll be 17 years old next February.

Naturally, I learned more as I spent time with these horses, and I feel that the next one in line was trained better than the last. I read books, watched videos, studied the pros at the shows behind the scenes as well as under the judge, asked hundreds of questions of these people, and spent countless hours just watching horses (mine and others) interact with each other in barns, stalls, pens, and in pastures. In many ways, I feel like I ought to have a diploma for everything I've learned in my life about horses. But the deciding factor in all of it is still TIME, just like EZ has said. Lots & lots of time and tons & tons of patience. Some horses will do what you want and start that bond right away, others will take weeks or months, and there are some that take several years. Is it worth it? You bet it is! It just depends on how much time you're willing to spend and how much patience you will have when doing it.

'Nuff said.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/31/2005 :  3:19:53 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I couldn't agree more, EZ. Time is the deciding factor in molding a horse into what you want. It doesn't happen overnight and sometimes takes years.

When I bought Wimpy, she had wire cut all over her body with most of them right between the ears. She was 5 years old and hadn't been ridden for the past 2 years. In other words, she'd just gotten a good start under saddle and then left. She saddled & bridled no problem and rode okay for just a horse to ride and fool around with. The problem? You'd be leading her along and then the next minute you had to let go of the lead or be dragged. Sometimes she'd take off like she'd been shot out of a cannon. She loaded terrible into a trailer and usually took at lest 3 people to get her in. It took over a year to teach her to trust me and fix these problems, and I had no idea what I was doing at the time. She was a fantastic trail horse, won many English pleasure classes, and was a fairly decent gaming horse. She sure was an education and I had her for 18 years.

I bought Warrior as a yearling, and he was the first horse I broke to saddle by myself. He was so laid back, it was like he'd done it all before. It was like he was saying, "Oh, you want to put that thing on my back? Sure, go ahead. It's not hurting me. No big deal." Same way when I mounted him for the first time. He just took everything in stride. Was he a great show horse? No, but he wasn't too shabby on trails and anyone could ride him.

W.T. was next, and he was one hard critter when it came to saddle training. Walking & trotting were fine. So was turning, stopping and even backing. But teaching him to canter was a whole 'nuther ball game. I don't think I've ever rode a horse that bucked harder or longer than he did every time in asked him to canter during his 2 year old year. I'd cue him to canter, he'd do it for 2 or 3 strides, then the head went down and the rear came up. I'd hang on as long as I could, and about the time I thought I couldn't hang on any longer, he'd quit. This went on for a year! I had people tell me to get rid of him, and he was way too much horse for me to handle... or to send him to a pro trainer. But I just kept on, and he finally got over his bucking... but it took a whole year to do it. He turned into a regional and national level show horse and would do gaming classes, pleasure driving, halter, and hunt seat pleasure all in the same day. Not bad for a horse that was going to do me serious harm and was too much horse for me.

Dove was by far the worst acter I ever owned when I bought him. He was a December 2 year stallion and it took 3 husky men to literally throw him into my trailer and slam the doors shut on him. He proceeded to lift all 4 trailer tires a good foot off the ground with his temper tantrum, and almost succeeded in lift my truck as well. My first thoughts were, "Oh my! What have I gotten myself into?" I was riding him as a 3 year old (We gelded him 2 weeks after bringing him home), but didn't show him under saddle until September of that year. It was at least 2 years before I felt I could let my guard down when riding him and not have him act like an idiot. Was it worth it? Well, he's standing out by the barn right now and is my lesson horse in introducing children to horse back riding for the first time. He was also a champion regional show horse, and is a wonderful trail horse... just as long as no deer pop up unexpectedly. He's been helping me teach others to ride for the last 5 years. Oh yeah, he'll be 17 years old next February.

Naturally, I learned more as I spent time with these horses, and I feel that the next one in line was trained better than the last. I read books, watched videos, studied the pros at the shows behind the scenes as well as under the judge, asked hundreds of questions of these people, and spent countless hours just watching horses (mine and others) interact with each other in barns, stalls, pens, and in pastures. In many ways, I feel like I ought to have a diploma for everything I've learned in my life about horses. But the deciding factor in all of it is still TIME, just like EZ has said. Lots & lots of time and tons & tons of patience. Some horses will do what you want and start that bond right away, others will take weeks or months, and there are some that take several years. Is it worth it? You bet it is! It just depends on how much time you're willing to spend and how much patience you will have when doing it.

'Nuff said.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2006 :  10:28:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Time is a good teacher. What's changed since you folks all started out with horses is the availability of resources like TV, more books, videos, DE forum
to get educated. Hopefully save some people from taking hardknocks and frustration. But EZ, you are so right...time still needs to be spent working with your horses. Sounds like a good New Year's resolution!
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2006 :  10:28:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Time is a good teacher. What's changed since you folks all started out with horses is the availability of resources like TV, more books, videos, DE forum
to get educated. Hopefully save some people from taking hardknocks and frustration. But EZ, you are so right...time still needs to be spent working with your horses. Sounds like a good New Year's resolution!
Go to Top of Page

EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2006 :  10:38:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
I think many of us, and I have to include myself in this, are spending way too much time & money on these training resources, and not enough time on the training, itself!! That was actually the point I was trying to make...though I guess I did ramble so much down memory lane, that it kind of got lost in the post!

EZ2SPOT
Go to Top of Page

EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 01/01/2006 :  10:38:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
I think many of us, and I have to include myself in this, are spending way too much time & money on these training resources, and not enough time on the training, itself!! That was actually the point I was trying to make...though I guess I did ramble so much down memory lane, that it kind of got lost in the post!

EZ2SPOT
Go to Top of Page

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2006 :  12:39:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
And what is wrong with spending money on horsey things! lol :D

Time is the one thing that people tend to forget. They watch an hour long show, spend maybe 2 hours all week on it and then don't understand why the next week their horse isn't ready for the stuff in the next week's show. This is why the Big Name guys selling the 'trainer in a box' are making money. Most of their stuff is designed in a step by step way. Parelli, I have to admit even though I don't care for him, has his methods set up so that they do help the people that were having time problems. The program is forcing them to take the time and do it step by step, which is why it helps those people the most. Each of the Big Name trainers have their programs set up to help people learn and if you look at them closely they can help different types of people. Parelli's is very straight forward, do this, do this type that hand leads you through it from A to Z. Anderson's is a little step by step(they all are in their own way) but also set up so that you can start when and where you need even if what you need is M, X and then A.

I think that it's easy to take the time if you work at it. It's like working out. It doesn't have to be an set time frame. You can spend 5-10 minutes at feeding time, 30 minutes after work, another 5 at 'bed check' and by the end of the week it can add up. You can't really ride in that time but ground work is always useful and can help the riding.
Go to Top of Page

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 01/02/2006 :  12:39:22 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
And what is wrong with spending money on horsey things! lol :D

Time is the one thing that people tend to forget. They watch an hour long show, spend maybe 2 hours all week on it and then don't understand why the next week their horse isn't ready for the stuff in the next week's show. This is why the Big Name guys selling the 'trainer in a box' are making money. Most of their stuff is designed in a step by step way. Parelli, I have to admit even though I don't care for him, has his methods set up so that they do help the people that were having time problems. The program is forcing them to take the time and do it step by step, which is why it helps those people the most. Each of the Big Name trainers have their programs set up to help people learn and if you look at them closely they can help different types of people. Parelli's is very straight forward, do this, do this type that hand leads you through it from A to Z. Anderson's is a little step by step(they all are in their own way) but also set up so that you can start when and where you need even if what you need is M, X and then A.

I think that it's easy to take the time if you work at it. It's like working out. It doesn't have to be an set time frame. You can spend 5-10 minutes at feeding time, 30 minutes after work, another 5 at 'bed check' and by the end of the week it can add up. You can't really ride in that time but ground work is always useful and can help the riding.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Daily Equine Forum © 2000-2002 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.2 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000