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 Need help with the mouthy horse.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/28/2005 :  10:55:56 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Well Jake has done it again!

He broke another barn window. I guess he didnt think I was getting the chores done fast enough tonight. He just took a bite out of the window. As soon as I heard the glass brake I ran out to see if he got hurt. I know it was him. He is the only horse I have every seen or had that uses his mounth like a pair of hands. He was OK not a mark on him No glass anywhere on him. But he know he did a bad thing because he was afaid to come by me and he didn't want to give me his head so I could check in his mouth for cuts or class.
I was in the barn cleaning picking the stalls as I always do as soon as I get home from work. Then I give hay and grain and fill the water pails so I can put everyone in for the night.
I guess I have another fix it project for this weekend. Put in a new window and cover them all with wire mesh.

What Can I do with this horse. Jake has been a curious horse from birth. I know this cause I was there. He is always getting into trouble.
Just a few examples. One day went I was out in the pasture working on the fence. He made a game out of stealing my tools. I had my lawn tracker with the cart hooked to it. In the cart I had all my tools, extra fence posts wire etc. I also had one of those gas powered weed wackers that I was using to cut away the weeds so they wouldn't short out the electic wire. Well I chased him off a few times for garbing may fence pliers, my bucket of insolaters and then my jacket that was hanging over the side of the cart. But He was having too much fun so he sneaked up when I wasn't looking and the next thing I know,, there goes Jake with the weed wacker.

Onother time I had my lesson kids out helping me pick up all the dead branches that had fallen from the trees into the pasture. The other horses paied little attention to us. But that Jake was pulling the branches out of the cart and dragging them off as fast as the kids could put them in.

On several occations I have caught him chasing the other horses aroung with the lunge whip that he must have grabbed as it was leaning up against the other side of the fence.

He is a real character that Jacob. Nothing is safe. My husband made the misake of parking and old truck in side the paddock fence. When no was looking Jacob pulled all the rubber molding off and was working on the side mirror.
He chews on riens, lead ropes anything he can get in his mouth.
He likes to grab your hat off your head or grab and pull out anything that is sticking out of your pockets. He has gotten hold of my cell phone a few times. He will grab anything he thinks is of interest to him.

New things!!! He is not happy to just smell a new thing, he has to grab it, taste it, and toss it around to see what it will do if you throw it up in the air.

I am afraid one day he will grab something and get himself into some real trouble. Not to mention I can't trust him around small children or anyone who is not used to horses and how some can be mouthy.

Any suggestions???

I whisper but my horse don't listen.

Edited by - Jacobs Buddy on 12/28/2005 11:26:26 PM

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  05:49:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
How about getting him a variety of horse chew balls so he can play with them. Or how about those big double ended rope ones for playing with big dogs. (maybe you should start the weed whacker and teach him to use it)
On a more serious note maybe you tie him up when you do things in the pasture. When you are finished work, I bet if you did a little work you with him could channel his inquisitiveness to do horse tricks of a positive nature. Sounds like he needs more challenge. You could try No chew or a pepper mixture on things so he would find out that some things are just not for him.

And I guess you could work with him to develop play things that you encourage him to play with and discourage him from those which are not acceptable. Maybe he is like a kid, he gets attention when he does the nose things and that is his way of making you pay attention. SMART HORSE.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  05:49:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
How about getting him a variety of horse chew balls so he can play with them. Or how about those big double ended rope ones for playing with big dogs. (maybe you should start the weed whacker and teach him to use it)
On a more serious note maybe you tie him up when you do things in the pasture. When you are finished work, I bet if you did a little work you with him could channel his inquisitiveness to do horse tricks of a positive nature. Sounds like he needs more challenge. You could try No chew or a pepper mixture on things so he would find out that some things are just not for him.

And I guess you could work with him to develop play things that you encourage him to play with and discourage him from those which are not acceptable. Maybe he is like a kid, he gets attention when he does the nose things and that is his way of making you pay attention. SMART HORSE.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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bigyellerdog
Groomer

USA
42 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  07:47:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit bigyellerdog's Homepage Send bigyellerdog a Private Message
hook's right, a chew ball would be right up Jake's alley. How old is Jake? I have a 2 year old that is like that, plays fetch with a stick, loves to chew on stuff. I got a lead rope with a chain on it, and he won't chew on that. Part of Shadow's problem I've discovered is he's cutting teeth. I went out one afternoon to feed and he lost his two front teeth. Babies are babies, and I guess his mouth was bothering him.
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bigyellerdog
Groomer

USA
42 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  07:47:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit bigyellerdog's Homepage Send bigyellerdog a Private Message
hook's right, a chew ball would be right up Jake's alley. How old is Jake? I have a 2 year old that is like that, plays fetch with a stick, loves to chew on stuff. I got a lead rope with a chain on it, and he won't chew on that. Part of Shadow's problem I've discovered is he's cutting teeth. I went out one afternoon to feed and he lost his two front teeth. Babies are babies, and I guess his mouth was bothering him.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  09:51:49 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
How old is Jake? Is he in training of any kind or broke to ride? The reason I ask is that some horses get bored very easily and need something to do to occupy their time when there's nothing to do... especially the ones with higher intelligence than average (They usually make the best saddle horses in the long run, too.)

I know because W.T. was like that. I had to board him at my cousin's for a few years, and there was several times she would call me up and say something like: "Would you PLEASE come out and take W.T. out for a ride? He's driving us crazy!" I'd laugh and go give him a workout and then call my cousin the next day: "Well, is he behaving now?" "Yes, thank you." I had to go work with him regularly or he found all kinds of things to get in to and cause no end of trouble.

Training him was a challenge, too, because he enjoyed learning new things. I started him as a pleasure/halter horse, but pleasure became such a bore after he had it down pat that he started blowing his classes deliberately. So, I taught him to drive and showing him in pleasure driving. He also liked to pull my cart around the neighborhood and down the country roads. He loved it. But I wanted something more than just one class to show him in. That's when I discovered he loved gaming classes. He was a regional champion in the Nez Perce Stake Race, earned an ROM in the Camas Prairie Stump Race, and was a reserve national champion in the Rope Race. He also finished 2nd in the nation in the Rope Race one year. While doing all that, he was many time regional pleasure driving champion.

Anyway, on top of all that, I tried to take him trail riding as much as I possibly could. All this helped to keep him out of trouble at home and around the barn... even though he got out of his stall, one day, and chased my cousin out of the barn when she discovered it... but that's another story.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  09:51:49 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
How old is Jake? Is he in training of any kind or broke to ride? The reason I ask is that some horses get bored very easily and need something to do to occupy their time when there's nothing to do... especially the ones with higher intelligence than average (They usually make the best saddle horses in the long run, too.)

I know because W.T. was like that. I had to board him at my cousin's for a few years, and there was several times she would call me up and say something like: "Would you PLEASE come out and take W.T. out for a ride? He's driving us crazy!" I'd laugh and go give him a workout and then call my cousin the next day: "Well, is he behaving now?" "Yes, thank you." I had to go work with him regularly or he found all kinds of things to get in to and cause no end of trouble.

Training him was a challenge, too, because he enjoyed learning new things. I started him as a pleasure/halter horse, but pleasure became such a bore after he had it down pat that he started blowing his classes deliberately. So, I taught him to drive and showing him in pleasure driving. He also liked to pull my cart around the neighborhood and down the country roads. He loved it. But I wanted something more than just one class to show him in. That's when I discovered he loved gaming classes. He was a regional champion in the Nez Perce Stake Race, earned an ROM in the Camas Prairie Stump Race, and was a reserve national champion in the Rope Race. He also finished 2nd in the nation in the Rope Race one year. While doing all that, he was many time regional pleasure driving champion.

Anyway, on top of all that, I tried to take him trail riding as much as I possibly could. All this helped to keep him out of trouble at home and around the barn... even though he got out of his stall, one day, and chased my cousin out of the barn when she discovered it... but that's another story.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  12:22:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Kids!! Have a visual of him running away with the weed whacker, LOL! Now, if you could just teach him to use it!!

My fjord was/is somewhat like that,,4 y/o and loves to play, grab halters, lead ropes, balls, you name it and run. Less mouthy now with some work. Gets bored easily. Maybe putting some of Jacobs energy into a positive work/learning lesson? Plexiglass in the barn for windows so less apt to break??

Mine have a ball with cardboard boxes, tossing them...just messy to clean up! Maybe leave him safe objects to investigate and despook himself? Find some ideas to turn that curiosity/energy into positive learning....???

He sounds like a cutie!

Edited by - fracturedbones on 12/29/2005 12:23:37 PM
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  12:22:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Kids!! Have a visual of him running away with the weed whacker, LOL! Now, if you could just teach him to use it!!

My fjord was/is somewhat like that,,4 y/o and loves to play, grab halters, lead ropes, balls, you name it and run. Less mouthy now with some work. Gets bored easily. Maybe putting some of Jacobs energy into a positive work/learning lesson? Plexiglass in the barn for windows so less apt to break??

Mine have a ball with cardboard boxes, tossing them...just messy to clean up! Maybe leave him safe objects to investigate and despook himself? Find some ideas to turn that curiosity/energy into positive learning....???

He sounds like a cutie!

Edited by - fracturedbones on 12/29/2005 12:23:37 PM
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:15:51 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Hello, I have gotten him a variety of toys. Horse balls, those big rope toys for dogs. He has old saddle blankets he plays with. We have gotten pretty creative with the toy making. I was thinking of getting a book I saw about teaching your horse tricks. I will try the no chew or pepper mix around the windows. Yes I think he is a bit of a ham and loves attention. I will have to teach him that balls are good cats are not. Jake will be 6 this May. I did find some of his baby teeth when I was cleaning his stall once but that was some time ago. I broke him myself. He is doing very well in his training. He really enjoys working. I just wish he would grow up some. I have been mainly working with him for please riding. I think I will get some poles and barrels and see how he likes that. I just remebered, Once I tried to work out a routine to music and he really seem to like that. I have a friend who ropes. He has been after me to work on one of his fillies for pleasure riding. May I should work out some kind of trade for a month or two and see how Jake feels about working cattle. Card board boxes?? I hadn't thought of that. The dogs seem to have a ball taring them up, why not Jake too. I will give some of these ideas a try. I will see if I can get some pic of his chinanagins. How many times a day do I say "who I wish I had my camera rite now!".

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:15:51 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Hello, I have gotten him a variety of toys. Horse balls, those big rope toys for dogs. He has old saddle blankets he plays with. We have gotten pretty creative with the toy making. I was thinking of getting a book I saw about teaching your horse tricks. I will try the no chew or pepper mix around the windows. Yes I think he is a bit of a ham and loves attention. I will have to teach him that balls are good cats are not. Jake will be 6 this May. I did find some of his baby teeth when I was cleaning his stall once but that was some time ago. I broke him myself. He is doing very well in his training. He really enjoys working. I just wish he would grow up some. I have been mainly working with him for please riding. I think I will get some poles and barrels and see how he likes that. I just remebered, Once I tried to work out a routine to music and he really seem to like that. I have a friend who ropes. He has been after me to work on one of his fillies for pleasure riding. May I should work out some kind of trade for a month or two and see how Jake feels about working cattle. Card board boxes?? I hadn't thought of that. The dogs seem to have a ball taring them up, why not Jake too. I will give some of these ideas a try. I will see if I can get some pic of his chinanagins. How many times a day do I say "who I wish I had my camera rite now!".

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:19:04 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Thank you for all your advice and stories. This is going to be challenging for me creating challenges for him. But he is such a cutie.

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:19:04 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Thank you for all your advice and stories. This is going to be challenging for me creating challenges for him. But he is such a cutie.

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:30:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
If using cardboard boxes for toys, just be sure they don't have the big metal staples on the flaps.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:30:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
If using cardboard boxes for toys, just be sure they don't have the big metal staples on the flaps.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:54:07 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Yes I will check that. How is the weather out there I SD? I just got a letter from my cousin Tina in whitewood. she what us to come out and visit some time soon. I would if I could bring Jake along.

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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Jacobs Buddy
Advanced Rider



USA
166 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  9:54:07 PM  Show Profile Send Jacobs Buddy a Private Message
Yes I will check that. How is the weather out there I SD? I just got a letter from my cousin Tina in whitewood. she what us to come out and visit some time soon. I would if I could bring Jake along.

I whisper but my horse don't listen.
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  10:36:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
I'm not too far from Whitewood. Temps have been better these last two weeks, 40's and 50's and no snow.

You could just bring Jake along, but be sure to stop at Toys R Us first to pick up some travel games to keep him busy on the road. ;o)
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ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 12/29/2005 :  10:36:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
I'm not too far from Whitewood. Temps have been better these last two weeks, 40's and 50's and no snow.

You could just bring Jake along, but be sure to stop at Toys R Us first to pick up some travel games to keep him busy on the road. ;o)
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  01:00:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
When picking toys you have to do like you would do with dogs, don't give them anything that is or is like what you don't want them to chew on. So for dogs no old socks, shoes, etc. For horses nothing leather, no to the old saddle blankets, if you use rope try to use ones that is different then your lead ropes if possible, no buckets, etc. If you donn't want him chewing on buckets and stealing them then don't give him one to start with.

We had a gelding like that but what he would normally do was bring the stuff to you. So when the guys would park in the pasture to go cut wood he would bring them the gas can, that was full in the back of the truck but not full by the time he got it to them. Or the battiery for the wood splitter, never mind that he stole it from the wood splitter and they had no use for it out in the woods.

For the chewing on fencing and the barn all you can do it put up things to make it hard for him. All windows that horses can reach should be bared no matter if they are mouthy or not. Use wire, sheet metal or hot wires to stop them from chewing on wood and plastic things. With lead ropes and reins and things that he tries to chew on when you have him tied up or working with him you just have to train him not to by making it harder to chew and easier to not chew. When he starts get after him about it, make him do something but do it every time. No "O' that's so cute" and let him get away with it. For being around people teach him to respect you and stay out of your space. All horses need to learn that and if they respect your space they aren't close enough to chew on you.

Also for toys have you got him anything that spits out treats or is a treat like the Lik It? Some really go for that.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  01:00:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
When picking toys you have to do like you would do with dogs, don't give them anything that is or is like what you don't want them to chew on. So for dogs no old socks, shoes, etc. For horses nothing leather, no to the old saddle blankets, if you use rope try to use ones that is different then your lead ropes if possible, no buckets, etc. If you donn't want him chewing on buckets and stealing them then don't give him one to start with.

We had a gelding like that but what he would normally do was bring the stuff to you. So when the guys would park in the pasture to go cut wood he would bring them the gas can, that was full in the back of the truck but not full by the time he got it to them. Or the battiery for the wood splitter, never mind that he stole it from the wood splitter and they had no use for it out in the woods.

For the chewing on fencing and the barn all you can do it put up things to make it hard for him. All windows that horses can reach should be bared no matter if they are mouthy or not. Use wire, sheet metal or hot wires to stop them from chewing on wood and plastic things. With lead ropes and reins and things that he tries to chew on when you have him tied up or working with him you just have to train him not to by making it harder to chew and easier to not chew. When he starts get after him about it, make him do something but do it every time. No "O' that's so cute" and let him get away with it. For being around people teach him to respect you and stay out of your space. All horses need to learn that and if they respect your space they aren't close enough to chew on you.

Also for toys have you got him anything that spits out treats or is a treat like the Lik It? Some really go for that.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  10:44:57 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Stormie; You reminded me of Terra's favorite toy when she was a yearling and a 2 year old (She's since outgrown it). I see your point in not using buckets for toys and agree with your reasoning, but there are exceptions to every rule.

I really don't remember exactly how she got it, but Terra used to play for hours with one of those plastic 5 gallon buckets you can get about anywhere. I made sure the wire handle was off of it, since I'd heard horror stories of horses getting their legs caught it them and slicing them up.

Anyway, she used to roll that bucket all over the arena with her nose and front legs. Then one day, I noticed she had it between her back legs, and acting like she couldn't figure out how to get away from it. So, like any concerned mom, I helped her step away from the bucket and put it to one side. I received this strange look on her face before she walked back to the bucket, sniffed it over with her nose, and then proceeded to back into the bucket until it was between her back legs, again, and started rolling it around just like she'd been doing when I noticed it the first time . It was a game she was playing with her bucket, and she was thoroughly enjoying it! I just laughed at her and let it go.

The strange part about all this is that in the winter, I set out two 5 gallon buckets full of water just inside the arena fence for my two horses to drink during the day. Terra knew the difference between the water buckets and her "toy". It was unusual for either her or Dove to tip those water buckets over... though it did happen occassionally.

Like I said; I totally understand why you say not to do this, but it worked just fine with Dove & Terra. They were definitely the exception to the rule.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  10:44:57 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Stormie; You reminded me of Terra's favorite toy when she was a yearling and a 2 year old (She's since outgrown it). I see your point in not using buckets for toys and agree with your reasoning, but there are exceptions to every rule.

I really don't remember exactly how she got it, but Terra used to play for hours with one of those plastic 5 gallon buckets you can get about anywhere. I made sure the wire handle was off of it, since I'd heard horror stories of horses getting their legs caught it them and slicing them up.

Anyway, she used to roll that bucket all over the arena with her nose and front legs. Then one day, I noticed she had it between her back legs, and acting like she couldn't figure out how to get away from it. So, like any concerned mom, I helped her step away from the bucket and put it to one side. I received this strange look on her face before she walked back to the bucket, sniffed it over with her nose, and then proceeded to back into the bucket until it was between her back legs, again, and started rolling it around just like she'd been doing when I noticed it the first time . It was a game she was playing with her bucket, and she was thoroughly enjoying it! I just laughed at her and let it go.

The strange part about all this is that in the winter, I set out two 5 gallon buckets full of water just inside the arena fence for my two horses to drink during the day. Terra knew the difference between the water buckets and her "toy". It was unusual for either her or Dove to tip those water buckets over... though it did happen occassionally.

Like I said; I totally understand why you say not to do this, but it worked just fine with Dove & Terra. They were definitely the exception to the rule.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  12:47:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
With training it is best hold off on giving things like that until the animal learns the difference. Terra did maybe because you didn't use them around her so she wasn't given the chance? It's like getting a puppy. If you pop an old shoe in front of them right away they are too young and too chewy to be able to understand the difference from that old shoe and your $500 custom made field boots. But if you wait until the pup is older and has learn the Leave It cue and a few other cues and understands when something is given to chew on and something isn't you have lessen the chances that your $500 field boots will be made into $500 chew toys. I still don't give my dogs clothing or shoes to chew on but my GSD will steal my one coat when she isn't feeling well and uses it as a pillow. But if you take a dog or a horse that already has a history of stealing things or chewing on things you don't want them to it's harder. If your 5 yr old chewed up a Prof. Choice SMX saddle pad it's not going to help the training if you give them old saddle pads and blankets to play with.....now that I think about it the Leave It cue should be trained into horses. It would make chewing so much easier to deal with. Do you think that a horse would think it was odd to send them to K9 school? lol I can just see it old Buster gets it into his head to buck and his owner is up there yelling Leave It, Leave It Buster. I do catch myself telling the horses and humans Leave It, not that it does any good.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  12:47:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
With training it is best hold off on giving things like that until the animal learns the difference. Terra did maybe because you didn't use them around her so she wasn't given the chance? It's like getting a puppy. If you pop an old shoe in front of them right away they are too young and too chewy to be able to understand the difference from that old shoe and your $500 custom made field boots. But if you wait until the pup is older and has learn the Leave It cue and a few other cues and understands when something is given to chew on and something isn't you have lessen the chances that your $500 field boots will be made into $500 chew toys. I still don't give my dogs clothing or shoes to chew on but my GSD will steal my one coat when she isn't feeling well and uses it as a pillow. But if you take a dog or a horse that already has a history of stealing things or chewing on things you don't want them to it's harder. If your 5 yr old chewed up a Prof. Choice SMX saddle pad it's not going to help the training if you give them old saddle pads and blankets to play with.....now that I think about it the Leave It cue should be trained into horses. It would make chewing so much easier to deal with. Do you think that a horse would think it was odd to send them to K9 school? lol I can just see it old Buster gets it into his head to buck and his owner is up there yelling Leave It, Leave It Buster. I do catch myself telling the horses and humans Leave It, not that it does any good.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/30/2005 :  1:05:45 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Interesting idea. I don't know if it'd work or not. LOL

I had a half-Arabian/half-QH gelding we boarded for awhile, and he amazed me in what he played with to while away the hours (he was a yearling/coming 2 year old). I had gaming barrels set up for practice in the arena, and it wasn't the least bit unusual for me to find one rolled on its side and outside the fence! So, one day, I kept an eye on him and watched him rock one of those barrels back & forth until it fell over and then use his whole head and neck to roll it out of the arena! These were the big all metal 55 gallon drums and he was a small made horse... not even 15 hands tall!

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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