Daily Equine Forum Visit Horse Saddle Shop Read Horse Saddle Shops Blog Horse Saddle Shop Twitter Horse Saddle Shop Facebook Image Map
Daily Equine Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics |Recent Messages | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Saddle and Tack Topics
 Tack Questions and Comments
 How to make and use a Sidepull
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  01:00:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I thought this might be easier instead of emailing it to 3-4 people, plus the number of photos can make it a pain to email off of this computer.

How to make a sidepull noseband


This noseband is designed to allow you to use a normal headstall and a curb strap. Unlike many sidepull bridles this will allow you to more easily custom fit a hard to fit horse. It may not fit all horses though because some will need a jaw strap to help stabilize it even more. You can have them added to a headstall by a repair shop.

What you will need:

Masking tape
Scissor or a knife
3/8” rope
2/16” rope
Four strong weld 1-1/2” rings
A strong needle
Fishing line or some type of strong thread
A candle and matches
Big nail
Pliers
Newspaper
Clothe measuring tape

What is nice to have:

Wood burning tool
1”-1 ˝” Wooden Dowel


You need to measure your horse to find out what size you need. Take the measuring tape and measure two inches behind the corner of the lips. You will measure from one side of the nose to there other to this spot on the face. You want the rings to be about two inches behind the lips and at that level or a little higher depending on the shape of the horse’s head. If you get too low your pressure will be off and if you get too high it will also be off. This measurement will be the finished length of the noseband. So you will need to adjust that measurement to get the length of the rope section. Remember to add some for the section that is folded over it will be at least 4”(2 for each side) plus a little extra so add at least 6 inches you can always cut off the extra.
Once you have that measurement you need to cut your 3/8” rope. You may use a thicker or thinner rope but remember that if you get too thin or too thick it can be hard to work with and the pressure or ‘loudness’ of the sidepull it going to be affect. You can also use one or two ropes but if you use a thin rope (3/8” or less) you really should have two). Measure your rope to the length you need and wrap masking tape around it so that it is centered over where you need to cut. Cut the rope and melt the end with the candle. You may want to hold the rope with pliers. Try not to make it too lumpy. You can shape it with a few layers of newspaper but don’t use your fingers because it does burn! You can also use the wood-burning tool for this. That is what I do. If you use the knife tool it will cut and melt it in one step. Cut the second piece the same way.
Take two of the rings and place both pieces of rope though it so that they lie flat next to each other and fold them over so that you have at least a 2” over lap. It is best to stitch them together at this point so that the rings are stitched on. Fishing line works great for this and holds up well. You can splice the rope together if you wish. Measure from the ends of the first two rings and figure out where the next two should be so that you get the right length. Attach the other two rings to the other side in the same manner. Try the noseband on the horse to make sure it is the right length.
You may want to melt the ends down somewhat so that they do not rub too much. You can use the nail and the candle but you must hold the nail with the pliers so that you don’t get burnt and carefully and slowly shape the ends. The newspaper can help with this also. Again you can use a wood-burning tool instead of the nail.
You can use the noseband at this point. It might not look ‘finished’ but it would work. Or you can ad the Large Knots to cover where you stitched the ends down. The Large Knots are a little hard to get the hang of. You might want to first try to make them on the wooden dowel with one rope first. You can use a marker to mark the 4 sides of the dowel so that you can keep track of where you are. Also if you have a really hard time making these or the small knots you can tie them first loosely on wooden dowels and carefully remove them and slide them onto the rope before you stitch the rings on. For the Large Knots you will need three pieces of 2/16” rope. Here are the directions for the Large Knot. Tighten the knot down so that it is snug and melt the ends with the nail or wood-burning tool.
Again at this point the noseband is useable but you may want to add the Pressure Knots. These are the first part of the Spanish Ring Knot or the five bight Turk’s head. The directions are for the Spanish Ring knot so you just need to do steps 1 through 11. These directions are from ‘How to Make Cowboy Horse Gear” by Bruce Grant. Unlike with the Large Knots you need to be careful when you melt the ends because you want these knots to move so that you can adjust them to where you need them or slide them all the way over so that they really don’t do anything.

At this point it’s finished completely but there are some other options you can do that I will get to later. To put your new sidepull bridle together you need to attach your headstall to the rings in the back along with the curb strap. On most horses a normal flat western curb strap is long enough. If not you can make one or have one made for you. The headstall should be a browband style with a throat latch because it is more stable then a one ear. Attach your favorite set of rings to the outside rings and you are done.

Here is some close ups of the knots.

Front of both knots together.


Back of Small knot


Back of Large knot



Customizing

There are a number of things you can do. Use different color rope for the main rope and the knots. You can leave the pressure knots off if you do not need them. You can take 2/16” rope and wrap the noseband. This will alter the pressure of it also and that may be an effect you want. You can wrap it in one of two ways. What I call the Around Wrap.

Take your 2/16” rope and measure a section out that is twice as long as the section you want to wrap and add about 3”. Fold this in half and lay it along the middle of the front of the nose band so that the folded end sticks out a little ways (that is important!). Starting at the other end wrap the rope around both larger ropes at once making sure to keep the end of the rope sticking out (that is important). Keep wrapping around and around making sure it is tight. Wrap until you get to the other end. With the end of the rope stick it through the folded end and hold it. Pull the other end of the rope that you left sticking out at the other end so that the folded end tightly holds the end just under the last wrap or two. Cut and melt both ends down.

What I call the Fish Tail.

Start by folding your 2/16” rope in half and placing the middle of it behind one end of the noseband. Bring the end on the right (A) in front of the Right Main Rope and then in between the two Main Ropes and behind the Left Main Rope. Now bring the left end (B) in front of the Left Main Rope and in between the Two Main ropes and behind the Right Main Rope. You will keep doing this all the way to the end by going A, B, A, B so that they alternate down the noseband. Make sure you push each one up tight to the one before and pull the rope tight. When you get to the end tie it off and melt it.

Another way to wrap the Fish Tail using two colors.

Tie both colors together and place the knot at the back of the noseband at one end. Do the same as above but each time you do a different color. Like bringing blue in front of Right Main Rope and going between the Two main ropes and behind Left Main Rope. Then bring white in front of Left Main Rope and go between the Two Main ropes and behind the Right Main Rope. Then continue with Blue, White, Blue, White. This works well for a Red, White and Blue one!!

Other projects

There are other things you can do with these same ideas. You can make reins by stitching snaps onto the ends and then placing the knots over them or wrapping over the ends. A dog leash can be made the same way. The knots can be places on normal halters, rope halters, headstalls, dog collars, breast colors, anything you want to dress up or have pressure knots on(like halters). I have been known to forget that I have a ring knot on my finger and go to town with them on! One thing that I like to do with the ring knots is to use them as brow band keepers like in the photo below. I always loose those things. They can also be used as keeper end where buckles are. Just make sure you make them large enough to slide a little and melt the ends.


How to use a Sidepull

Basically a sidepull is like the snaffle of the bitless bridles. It’s an easy to understand, direct pressure bridle that has no leverage. That means that if you pull on the Right rein with 5 lbs of pressure the horse is going to feel five lbs of pressure on the Left side of his face directing him to the Right. If you pull back on both reins at once the pressure is going to be on the front of the nose. There is no leverage, curb pressure, poll pressure, etc.
When you fit any sidepull you want the rings to be about 2” behind the lips, which is about where the rings of a snaffle would be. The noseband needs to be snug not hanging loose. The browband needs to fit and not be too tight or loose. The throat latch should be tight enough it holds the bridle in place but not so tight it affects the breathing or the placement of the head.
Because it is like a snaffle you can use it as a snaffle. It is great as a first bridle for a young horse. You can direct rein in it but you can also neck rein with it. It can be good to use when retraining a horse that is having issues with his training.
It is not for all horses or riders though. Some horses will just not like to go bitless and some riders can misuse even bitless styles like this one. If you are thinking of moving into a sidepull make sure you start out in a small enclosed area and reinforce the basics of going forward, halting, turning, giving to the bridle, backing, and transitions.
You cannot show in a sidepull but like with any bridle style that does not mean that you can’t use it if you show. There is nothing to stop you from using a sidepull or any other style at home when you are schooling or just having a fun day with your horse.
No matter the sidepull make sure you check for rubbing. Any type of nosepiece can rub the horse. If this happens make sure you have it adjusted correctly and if needed wrap the noseband (or curb strap if that is the problem) with something like strips of fabric, Sealtex or even Vetwrap. With Sealtex or Vetwrap you may want to put a layer of fabric or a halter fleece cover over it as they can get rough spots. They are good for quickly making a noseband fatter, stiffer and are easier to shape to make it flat instead of round.
Horses can get hard noses just like they can get hard mouths. Both are caused by the same thing, poor hands or poor training. It is not the horse or the bridle (in most cases) that makes a mouth or nose hard it is the poor training or the ungiving hands that do that. So make sure that you do not make your horse’s nose hard. Keep your hands light and your training up to day and the horse will always keep a light nose or mouth.

Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  08:38:16 AM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
Thanks for all the instructions Stormie. I want to put my coming 3 yr old under saddle this spring and was thinking a sidepull would be a good place to start.

And here Mr Parrot was wondering what his next winter project was going to be. As soon as he is done cleaning the saddles, I'm going to ask for one of these.

Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
Go to Top of Page

Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  08:38:16 AM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
Thanks for all the instructions Stormie. I want to put my coming 3 yr old under saddle this spring and was thinking a sidepull would be a good place to start.

And here Mr Parrot was wondering what his next winter project was going to be. As soon as he is done cleaning the saddles, I'm going to ask for one of these.

Jill
Life is too short to ride bad horses.
Go to Top of Page

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  08:49:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
He can clean MY saddles, if he's needin' something to do! :)

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  08:49:01 AM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
He can clean MY saddles, if he's needin' something to do! :)

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  12:16:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Mine too! I have a couple old ones that are well over due for a good cleaning but got pushed to the side when I was working on the McClellan I picked up this summer.
Go to Top of Page

Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/17/2005 :  12:16:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Mine too! I have a couple old ones that are well over due for a good cleaning but got pushed to the side when I was working on the McClellan I picked up this summer.
Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Daily Equine Forum © 2000-2002 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.06 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000