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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2005 :  10:32:05 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
I just bought my first English saddle. I've only ridden Western in the past (or an Endurance, sort of a cross between the two).

What I like about English is the increased ability to feel the horse under your legs -- closer contact. What bothered me, in my first ride in it, is that I just don't have the same feeling of security that I do in a Western. Best way I can describe it, is with western, I feel like I'm riding IN the saddle; with english, I feel like I'm riding ON the saddle.

Is that something you just get used to so that once you're used to it, you feel more secure? If horse bolts in an English saddle and you have a grab strap between the 2 front D rings, if you get caught off guard, is it a lot harder to stay on?

Any advice or opinions as to the differences between western and english once you get used to them would be VERY much appreciated.

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2005 :  1:53:02 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I remember my first time in an English saddle. I'm assuming this is a hunt seat type saddle... like the ones you see jumping horses wearing on TV? The first thing I thought was someone had forgotten to finish making the saddle. Where was the horn for crying out loud?! I know exactly what you mean about riding "ON" it instead of "IN" it. It does take time to get used to the transition.

About the only thing you have to latch on to if you lose your balance to stay on is the pommel or the horse's mane. Even though I don't ride hunt seat much anymore, I still enjoy riding in one once in awhile. But I mostly trail ride, nowadays, and my hunt seat saddle seems to be collecting more dust these days.

Do you have anything specific you would like advice about? The one thing that comes to mind is stirrup length. In a hunt seat saddle, if you take your feet out of the stirrups once you're mounted on the horse, your ankles should be even with the bottom of your irons (that's what they call English stirrups). It feels a little strange having your stirrups that short, but it puts your legs in the proper position and your knees where they belong.

Do you know how to post to a trot? I'm short on time, today, but if I don't get back in time hopefully someone can explain it to you. Otherwise, I'll be back, tomorrow, when I have more time to explain it. Is there any place near you that gives lessons in English style riding? That's would actually be your best option.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2005 :  1:53:02 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
I remember my first time in an English saddle. I'm assuming this is a hunt seat type saddle... like the ones you see jumping horses wearing on TV? The first thing I thought was someone had forgotten to finish making the saddle. Where was the horn for crying out loud?! I know exactly what you mean about riding "ON" it instead of "IN" it. It does take time to get used to the transition.

About the only thing you have to latch on to if you lose your balance to stay on is the pommel or the horse's mane. Even though I don't ride hunt seat much anymore, I still enjoy riding in one once in awhile. But I mostly trail ride, nowadays, and my hunt seat saddle seems to be collecting more dust these days.

Do you have anything specific you would like advice about? The one thing that comes to mind is stirrup length. In a hunt seat saddle, if you take your feet out of the stirrups once you're mounted on the horse, your ankles should be even with the bottom of your irons (that's what they call English stirrups). It feels a little strange having your stirrups that short, but it puts your legs in the proper position and your knees where they belong.

Do you know how to post to a trot? I'm short on time, today, but if I don't get back in time hopefully someone can explain it to you. Otherwise, I'll be back, tomorrow, when I have more time to explain it. Is there any place near you that gives lessons in English style riding? That's would actually be your best option.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2005 :  3:17:42 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Hi, RH--

No, mine is not a hunt seat, it's an All Purpose (sort of a combination between Dressage and Close Contact -- it has the flare at the front but also some length to the side flaps. I think my stirrups were too long the one time so far I've ridden in it, but will use your suggestion as a guide.

As for posting, yes I've always known how to post, I even post on a western with Cloud sometimes, depending on her trot at the time. I prefer a sitting trot but it depends on how BIG of a trot we're in, lol. She has different degrees of "trot," more than any other horse I've ridden.

As for something to hang onto if the unexpected happens, I looked at Grab Straps (a/k/a "bucking straps") and they are way too long. You'd be holding the thing at belly button height and it would have way too much swing and leeway to it, but they seem to be a pretty standard length. I attached, instead, a curb strap which I have set to go fairly straight across the pommel, but could loosen it if I wanted, to have a little more arch.

Here's a link to show you the saddle. It has more contact if I want to get into dressage (a lot of first level dressage riders use an AP saddle) and it also seems to be the choice of "firsts" on English when people are used to western. But I do wish it had a little deeper seat (higher cantle) just because that would add to feeling a little more secure. I'm figuring that a lot of that is psychological because you can get off balance in a Western saddle also (in fact it's actually harder to bail from in some ways). Next time I may try my shearling seat pad because I know even in the western one it made me feel more secure, it has a tad of grip that a leather or smooth synthetic seat doesn't offer.
http://www.wintec.net.au/
On menu on the right (blue lineup) click on All Purpose Wintec 500. I thought there was a front view and other views, but not on that website apparently. But that shows it. And yes, I know, there are lower cantled, flatter seat English saddles, lol. I must be spoiled by Western.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/05/2005 :  3:17:42 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Hi, RH--

No, mine is not a hunt seat, it's an All Purpose (sort of a combination between Dressage and Close Contact -- it has the flare at the front but also some length to the side flaps. I think my stirrups were too long the one time so far I've ridden in it, but will use your suggestion as a guide.

As for posting, yes I've always known how to post, I even post on a western with Cloud sometimes, depending on her trot at the time. I prefer a sitting trot but it depends on how BIG of a trot we're in, lol. She has different degrees of "trot," more than any other horse I've ridden.

As for something to hang onto if the unexpected happens, I looked at Grab Straps (a/k/a "bucking straps") and they are way too long. You'd be holding the thing at belly button height and it would have way too much swing and leeway to it, but they seem to be a pretty standard length. I attached, instead, a curb strap which I have set to go fairly straight across the pommel, but could loosen it if I wanted, to have a little more arch.

Here's a link to show you the saddle. It has more contact if I want to get into dressage (a lot of first level dressage riders use an AP saddle) and it also seems to be the choice of "firsts" on English when people are used to western. But I do wish it had a little deeper seat (higher cantle) just because that would add to feeling a little more secure. I'm figuring that a lot of that is psychological because you can get off balance in a Western saddle also (in fact it's actually harder to bail from in some ways). Next time I may try my shearling seat pad because I know even in the western one it made me feel more secure, it has a tad of grip that a leather or smooth synthetic seat doesn't offer.
http://www.wintec.net.au/
On menu on the right (blue lineup) click on All Purpose Wintec 500. I thought there was a front view and other views, but not on that website apparently. But that shows it. And yes, I know, there are lower cantled, flatter seat English saddles, lol. I must be spoiled by Western.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  01:09:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I had the same problem with the Wintec 500 and it wasn't my first time in an english saddle. My first english saddle was a great AP that was very deep seated.

It does take some getting use to but I would first make sure it fits the horse. I know that when they perch up on the back it makes that feeling worst. Also it might be that the saddle doesn't fit you. So if the problem doesn't go away you might have to go with a better fit for you. The twist could be off for your build, the seat might not be wide enough. When I was taking dressage lessons at this one barn it seemed like I was on a different horse every time because I got to try out the new ones. That meant a different saddle all of the time and some worked for me others didn't. One that was really bad was a big enough seat but I felt like I was sitting on a little mini sized saddle. It was made worst by the fact that the horse was huge.

I have also just tied a piece of rope for a grap strap. I make a lot of stuff out of rope...speak of which I got the one program on this computer so hopefully I can get the directions open on making a side pull to email to you. If it doesn't work I'll try to send it anyway and see if you can open it.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  01:09:56 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
I had the same problem with the Wintec 500 and it wasn't my first time in an english saddle. My first english saddle was a great AP that was very deep seated.

It does take some getting use to but I would first make sure it fits the horse. I know that when they perch up on the back it makes that feeling worst. Also it might be that the saddle doesn't fit you. So if the problem doesn't go away you might have to go with a better fit for you. The twist could be off for your build, the seat might not be wide enough. When I was taking dressage lessons at this one barn it seemed like I was on a different horse every time because I got to try out the new ones. That meant a different saddle all of the time and some worked for me others didn't. One that was really bad was a big enough seat but I felt like I was sitting on a little mini sized saddle. It was made worst by the fact that the horse was huge.

I have also just tied a piece of rope for a grap strap. I make a lot of stuff out of rope...speak of which I got the one program on this computer so hopefully I can get the directions open on making a side pull to email to you. If it doesn't work I'll try to send it anyway and see if you can open it.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  08:11:24 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Stormie, that would be great (side pull instructions). Let me know what program you have, maybe it's one I know how to deal with. If a side pull is what I think it is, I'd love to see how to make one. I've heard that term used for both bitless bridle (for riding) and also I think as a working halter that has more control. Which is the one you're talking about?

As for the Wintec 500, you found you didn't feel as secure in it compared to other English, eh? Next time I try it I'm going to put the shearling seat cover on it, it gives a little more stability feel as opposed to smooth leather/equileather. That may help some.

I think all English saddles would appear to me to be "perched" in comparison to Western. Very interesting though, the Wintec500 I borrowed to try (ever so fleetingly brief, about 10 minutes) looked definitely "perched" on Cloud, yet the one I'd bought didn't as much. Same saddle, except the "perched" one had the wide gullet in it, mine has the regular (medium). That shouldn't make any difference on the back of the saddle. Mine definitely fits Cloud in the withers, I get 4 fingers with no weight, and tho it's hard to bend hand around to get an accurate finger stack, I believe 3 (at least 2) with me on her. I read on a website that sells them that Wintecs can look "perched" at first (the word they used), they settle in. Will have to find that site again and re-read it.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  08:11:24 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
Stormie, that would be great (side pull instructions). Let me know what program you have, maybe it's one I know how to deal with. If a side pull is what I think it is, I'd love to see how to make one. I've heard that term used for both bitless bridle (for riding) and also I think as a working halter that has more control. Which is the one you're talking about?

As for the Wintec 500, you found you didn't feel as secure in it compared to other English, eh? Next time I try it I'm going to put the shearling seat cover on it, it gives a little more stability feel as opposed to smooth leather/equileather. That may help some.

I think all English saddles would appear to me to be "perched" in comparison to Western. Very interesting though, the Wintec500 I borrowed to try (ever so fleetingly brief, about 10 minutes) looked definitely "perched" on Cloud, yet the one I'd bought didn't as much. Same saddle, except the "perched" one had the wide gullet in it, mine has the regular (medium). That shouldn't make any difference on the back of the saddle. Mine definitely fits Cloud in the withers, I get 4 fingers with no weight, and tho it's hard to bend hand around to get an accurate finger stack, I believe 3 (at least 2) with me on her. I read on a website that sells them that Wintecs can look "perched" at first (the word they used), they settle in. Will have to find that site again and re-read it.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  12:02:32 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Sounds like you've had some experience with English saddles before, OTW. I didn't know, and was starting from scratch.

Great advice as normal, Stormie. I thought I had enough experience to talk on this subject, and now I'm not so sure. I'm not well versed on all the different English saddles. My experience is limited to one year with a hunter/jumper stable and showing 4 different horse in hunt seat pleasure classes at ApHC regional & national levels. Dressage is something I've thought about taking lessons in... though I have used elementary dressage techniques in my horse training.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  12:02:32 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Sounds like you've had some experience with English saddles before, OTW. I didn't know, and was starting from scratch.

Great advice as normal, Stormie. I thought I had enough experience to talk on this subject, and now I'm not so sure. I'm not well versed on all the different English saddles. My experience is limited to one year with a hunter/jumper stable and showing 4 different horse in hunt seat pleasure classes at ApHC regional & national levels. Dressage is something I've thought about taking lessons in... though I have used elementary dressage techniques in my horse training.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  6:43:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Red Hawk

I haven't done that much with english and not for a couple years but with having such a hard time fitting Jazz for a saddle I have been forced to learn more about english saddles then I ever wanted to know!


OTW

To wide i the gullet can make the back pop up. One other thing I found is that with the CAIR panels(like all panels) it can be shaped wrong for the horse. I tried one that was filled more on one side then the other. I not totally sure how the CAIR panels work but that didn't look right to be at all. If one saddle was flocked and other a CAIR or even just one broke in more or broke in to one type of horse that would make a difference.

The sidepull I'm talking about is a bitless bridle not a halter. I think the halter you are thinking of is Dually Halter which would be different yet. I think it is saved on Word but when the computer went haywire I lot that program and don't have it back. I'm stuck with Works for now and it's an older one so I'm not sure if it will open it or not. If not I'll try to find somewhere I posted it before.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/06/2005 :  6:43:58 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Red Hawk

I haven't done that much with english and not for a couple years but with having such a hard time fitting Jazz for a saddle I have been forced to learn more about english saddles then I ever wanted to know!


OTW

To wide i the gullet can make the back pop up. One other thing I found is that with the CAIR panels(like all panels) it can be shaped wrong for the horse. I tried one that was filled more on one side then the other. I not totally sure how the CAIR panels work but that didn't look right to be at all. If one saddle was flocked and other a CAIR or even just one broke in more or broke in to one type of horse that would make a difference.

The sidepull I'm talking about is a bitless bridle not a halter. I think the halter you are thinking of is Dually Halter which would be different yet. I think it is saved on Word but when the computer went haywire I lot that program and don't have it back. I'm stuck with Works for now and it's an older one so I'm not sure if it will open it or not. If not I'll try to find somewhere I posted it before.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  10:41:35 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

Sounds like you've had some experience with English saddles before, OTW. I didn't know, and was starting from scratch.

Great advice as normal, Stormie. I thought I had enough experience to talk on this subject, and now I'm not so sure. I'm not well versed on all the different English saddles. My experience is limited to one year with a hunter/jumper stable and showing 4 different horse in hunt seat pleasure classes at ApHC regional & national levels. Dressage is something I've thought about taking lessons in... though I have used elementary dressage techniques in my horse training.



Absolutely no experience at all, RH. LOL. (As usual.) No, I actually have spent a lot of time reading about the different types, and went to a tack store and they explained the difference. I told her I was starting from scratch and what I wanted it for, namely a closer contact with my horse (missing totally with the western saddle I'm using); I wanted to be able to use it for some basic, elementary dressage in case I wanted to take lessons in that; and also, I wanted it to be comfortable enough for trail riding.

I'd been looking at their dressage saddles and when I told her that, she said, "Sounds like you should have an AP saddle." Then another person told me the differences. Once she did, I could see it. Up till then they all looked the same to me.

First English saddle I've ever sat in was at the tack shop. So I'm totally green on English saddles, just accumulated some info about them.

As for stirrup length, I didn't know that until I read your post. Mine are definitely set too long, daughter even thought so. I raised them a notch and may raise them another next time I ride her.

STORMIE: I have a feeling that something was wrong with the Wintec 500 AP that I borrowed to try on Cloud before I bought the one online. It just looked funny, too "perched." I took a chance on buying the other one, and immediately when I put it on her I felt it sat better. Next time I put it on her (hopefully later today) I'm going to girth it up and do a much more detailed fit check. I have a feeling it may be a pretty reasonable fit.

Regarding your files, what happened to toast your computer? A virus of some sort? If your MS Word program was a newer version than your MS Works program, that may be why it won't open.

**** Great info, I have used this!****
Also, if you have Windows XP (and I'm sure there's a similar way to do this with other OpSys) there is a way to restore your computer to however it was before a certain date. Say you screw something up. You can go into Control Panel and there's a choice where you can pick a date in the past (the day before your computer got screwed up) and RESTORE the system to how it was on that date. And I believe that's the word it's listed under. That little trick can fix a variety of problems. It won't delete work you've done since that date (saved data files), it will just RESTORE SYSTEM.
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  10:41:35 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Red Hawk

Sounds like you've had some experience with English saddles before, OTW. I didn't know, and was starting from scratch.

Great advice as normal, Stormie. I thought I had enough experience to talk on this subject, and now I'm not so sure. I'm not well versed on all the different English saddles. My experience is limited to one year with a hunter/jumper stable and showing 4 different horse in hunt seat pleasure classes at ApHC regional & national levels. Dressage is something I've thought about taking lessons in... though I have used elementary dressage techniques in my horse training.



Absolutely no experience at all, RH. LOL. (As usual.) No, I actually have spent a lot of time reading about the different types, and went to a tack store and they explained the difference. I told her I was starting from scratch and what I wanted it for, namely a closer contact with my horse (missing totally with the western saddle I'm using); I wanted to be able to use it for some basic, elementary dressage in case I wanted to take lessons in that; and also, I wanted it to be comfortable enough for trail riding.

I'd been looking at their dressage saddles and when I told her that, she said, "Sounds like you should have an AP saddle." Then another person told me the differences. Once she did, I could see it. Up till then they all looked the same to me.

First English saddle I've ever sat in was at the tack shop. So I'm totally green on English saddles, just accumulated some info about them.

As for stirrup length, I didn't know that until I read your post. Mine are definitely set too long, daughter even thought so. I raised them a notch and may raise them another next time I ride her.

STORMIE: I have a feeling that something was wrong with the Wintec 500 AP that I borrowed to try on Cloud before I bought the one online. It just looked funny, too "perched." I took a chance on buying the other one, and immediately when I put it on her I felt it sat better. Next time I put it on her (hopefully later today) I'm going to girth it up and do a much more detailed fit check. I have a feeling it may be a pretty reasonable fit.

Regarding your files, what happened to toast your computer? A virus of some sort? If your MS Word program was a newer version than your MS Works program, that may be why it won't open.

**** Great info, I have used this!****
Also, if you have Windows XP (and I'm sure there's a similar way to do this with other OpSys) there is a way to restore your computer to however it was before a certain date. Say you screw something up. You can go into Control Panel and there's a choice where you can pick a date in the past (the day before your computer got screwed up) and RESTORE the system to how it was on that date. And I believe that's the word it's listed under. That little trick can fix a variety of problems. It won't delete work you've done since that date (saved data files), it will just RESTORE SYSTEM.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  1:08:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
The works is older then the word was. My computer guy put the Word on for me and then when he fixed this time didn't put it back on. We had a storm around thanksgiving and it was knocking the power off but it was that on, off, on, off thing and the computer just fired. He couldn't restore much on it and had to replace a bunch of stuff. I lost a bunch of stuff, mostly photos, files, etc. I haven't tried to open this file yet. I have it on CD and need to find it first which is what I'm trying to do right now. Nothing is marked well so out of 20 cds it has to be somewhere! lol
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  1:08:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
The works is older then the word was. My computer guy put the Word on for me and then when he fixed this time didn't put it back on. We had a storm around thanksgiving and it was knocking the power off but it was that on, off, on, off thing and the computer just fired. He couldn't restore much on it and had to replace a bunch of stuff. I lost a bunch of stuff, mostly photos, files, etc. I haven't tried to open this file yet. I have it on CD and need to find it first which is what I'm trying to do right now. Nothing is marked well so out of 20 cds it has to be somewhere! lol
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  2:15:33 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Stormie

The works is older then the word was. My computer guy put the Word on for me and then when he fixed this time didn't put it back on. We had a storm around thanksgiving and it was knocking the power off but it was that on, off, on, off thing and the computer just fired. He couldn't restore much on it and had to replace a bunch of stuff. I lost a bunch of stuff, mostly photos, files, etc. I haven't tried to open this file yet. I have it on CD and need to find it first which is what I'm trying to do right now. Nothing is marked well so out of 20 cds it has to be somewhere! lol



Arrrrgh, sounds like my office. I have about 30 CDs to go through (okay 15 but it seems like more). It goes fast once you start, but the problem is starting, lol.

SO sorry to hear about your computer getting fried. When we have a big windstorm or anything that even makes me think the power's going to go (and it will in a heartbeat), I turn off. If it's going to be an electric storm, I downright climb under and behind and unplug. I lost a hard drive and a LOT of business-related stuff I culdn't duplicate, thank heavens I'd backed it up and was able to recopy it back onto new hard drive. At least you have your data files on CDs, or some (hopefully most) of them. It's soooo easy not to bother backing up, but when things go south, that's all that saves you.

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/07/2005 :  2:15:33 PM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by Stormie

The works is older then the word was. My computer guy put the Word on for me and then when he fixed this time didn't put it back on. We had a storm around thanksgiving and it was knocking the power off but it was that on, off, on, off thing and the computer just fired. He couldn't restore much on it and had to replace a bunch of stuff. I lost a bunch of stuff, mostly photos, files, etc. I haven't tried to open this file yet. I have it on CD and need to find it first which is what I'm trying to do right now. Nothing is marked well so out of 20 cds it has to be somewhere! lol



Arrrrgh, sounds like my office. I have about 30 CDs to go through (okay 15 but it seems like more). It goes fast once you start, but the problem is starting, lol.

SO sorry to hear about your computer getting fried. When we have a big windstorm or anything that even makes me think the power's going to go (and it will in a heartbeat), I turn off. If it's going to be an electric storm, I downright climb under and behind and unplug. I lost a hard drive and a LOT of business-related stuff I culdn't duplicate, thank heavens I'd backed it up and was able to recopy it back onto new hard drive. At least you have your data files on CDs, or some (hopefully most) of them. It's soooo easy not to bother backing up, but when things go south, that's all that saves you.

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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  12:05:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
It was a freak thing. It wasn't really storming but snowing. It just build up and before I figured anything was going to happen the power went crazy.
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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  12:05:03 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
It was a freak thing. It wasn't really storming but snowing. It just build up and before I figured anything was going to happen the power went crazy.
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  04:05:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
A good plan is to buy one of the USB hard drives, 30 Gig or so and hook it to your computer to do automatic scheduled back-ups. I am sure your local computer guy could fix you up.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 12/08/2005 :  04:05:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
A good plan is to buy one of the USB hard drives, 30 Gig or so and hook it to your computer to do automatic scheduled back-ups. I am sure your local computer guy could fix you up.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2005 :  11:29:08 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
I tried English saddle again yesterday. I admit, I was hinky about it, I don't have the same feeling of security in it. Grab strap helped a lot with that, and so did (psychologically) a fleece saddle cover which gives a cushier, more "sunk in" feel. AND shortening my stirrups. Based of RH's advice, they were ridiculously long. When I got them short enough to dangle at my ankle bones, the leathers turning sideways bothered me (rubbed into my panta legs), but another notch down and they didn't. That's 3 notches from where they started from though, lol.

ONE QUESTION: Cloud's withers don't rise up, then immediately down and suddenly her sway in her back starts. They go up, then they t-r-a-i-l down again, so the sway part of her back is just farther back than it is on other horses. I had the saddle positioned so it looked perfect from all normal fitting guides, but by the time we rode for 1/2 hour, it had slid back quite a ways. Girth was tight enough, but just the way it settles itself in.

Should I tamper around with a breastplate to keep it farther forward? Or just resign myself to riding back farther on the horse than I'd rather? (Saddle AND pad slid back.) I don't think girth could have been reasonably any tighter than it was. I'd sure rather have saddle farther forward than it wants to slide, but I'm wondering if it's just finding its normal place on HER particular back and I should leave well enough alone.

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OnTheWay
Clinician

1433 Posts

Posted - 12/09/2005 :  11:29:08 AM  Show Profile Send OnTheWay a Private Message
I tried English saddle again yesterday. I admit, I was hinky about it, I don't have the same feeling of security in it. Grab strap helped a lot with that, and so did (psychologically) a fleece saddle cover which gives a cushier, more "sunk in" feel. AND shortening my stirrups. Based of RH's advice, they were ridiculously long. When I got them short enough to dangle at my ankle bones, the leathers turning sideways bothered me (rubbed into my panta legs), but another notch down and they didn't. That's 3 notches from where they started from though, lol.

ONE QUESTION: Cloud's withers don't rise up, then immediately down and suddenly her sway in her back starts. They go up, then they t-r-a-i-l down again, so the sway part of her back is just farther back than it is on other horses. I had the saddle positioned so it looked perfect from all normal fitting guides, but by the time we rode for 1/2 hour, it had slid back quite a ways. Girth was tight enough, but just the way it settles itself in.

Should I tamper around with a breastplate to keep it farther forward? Or just resign myself to riding back farther on the horse than I'd rather? (Saddle AND pad slid back.) I don't think girth could have been reasonably any tighter than it was. I'd sure rather have saddle farther forward than it wants to slide, but I'm wondering if it's just finding its normal place on HER particular back and I should leave well enough alone.

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Stormie
Clinician

1630 Posts

Posted - 12/10/2005 :  12:42:24 AM  Show Profile  Visit Stormie's Homepage Send Stormie a Private Message
Sliding can be a sign that the saddle doesn't fit the best.
A breastcollar can help but first I would see about adjusting the girth. What billets did you have the girth buckled too?
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