Daily Equine Forum Visit Horse Saddle Shop Read Horse Saddle Shops Blog Horse Saddle Shop Twitter Horse Saddle Shop Facebook Image Map
Daily Equine Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics |Recent Messages | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Caring and Owning Horses
 The Beginning Rider
 another new beginner
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

paintedbliss
Trainer



USA
618 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  4:52:09 PM  Show Profile Send paintedbliss a Private Message
I just bought my first riding horse. She seems like a sweet mare. I took riding lessons on and off, mostly off over the last few years.I am 43 now and a bit nervous, but excited. When i went looking a couple of years ago, hubby decided to buy me a baby, I know not the wisest choice,pretty toabaino paint. she is a fairly gentle girl, i have taught her some groundwork myself, she picks up feet, leads, pretty much obeys me. She has gotten my confidence up.I had boarded her with a farrier and he over the last year taught me alot. I wanted a riding horse to trail ride and have fun with, until my other girl is ready.
I found a very nice mare, another paint.She is 14.3 hands I'm 5'5 and 135lbs. She is a sorrel overo with a bald face and flaxen mane and tail. Her name is bliss She was a former reiner two years ago and got burned out in reining. You can tell she is welltrained, when she saw the saddle coming she stood up straight and never budged. The horse belonged to their 10 year old son who prefers atvs to horses.
She is not a speed demon but has a really nice trot and lope. She was also trained in competive trail, i got to ride her for a very short ride, but fell in love with her instantly. I plan on taking my time with her when she comes home. She comes home dec 4th, she will be staying at home with me, sweetie will come home then as well. We have a small lean to and a large pasture area. I plan on taking my time with her. We have No barn, but a big shed we can put them in when it gets real cold. The owner said she lives in a leanto with them and lived in one in wisconsin.(i know it gets cold there). I have blankets for them when the weather is real bad. My filly hates coming inside, so i know she will do fine.I'm just a lil nervous, hoping they will adjust. Neither one is aggressive but both defend themselves. Here are some pictures of my girls






edited to insert pictures

Edited by - PaintGal on 11/14/2005 8:45:34 PM

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  4:58:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Welcome, paintedbliss!!!

Very nice looking girls that you've got! Thanks for including their photos! We love pics! :) Bliss sounds like a sweetie!

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  4:58:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Welcome, paintedbliss!!!

Very nice looking girls that you've got! Thanks for including their photos! We love pics! :) Bliss sounds like a sweetie!

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  4:59:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Welcome to the Forum. Nice helpful folks here and you have only to ask for suggestions.
Nice pictures of your horses. Sound like you are off to a good start.

Ed

"How Tyme Flys"
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  4:59:52 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Welcome to the Forum. Nice helpful folks here and you have only to ask for suggestions.
Nice pictures of your horses. Sound like you are off to a good start.

Ed

"How Tyme Flys"
Go to Top of Page

ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  5:25:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
paintedbliss, welcome to the forum! I'm fairly new here also, and have found the folks here very helpful and friendly.

Beautiful horses!
Go to Top of Page

ree7
Advanced Rider

USA
164 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  5:25:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit ree7's Homepage Send ree7 a Private Message
paintedbliss, welcome to the forum! I'm fairly new here also, and have found the folks here very helpful and friendly.

Beautiful horses!
Go to Top of Page

FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  5:55:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Welcome...we look forward to hearing more about your horses...and your riding adventures.

Flooper

"Daddy, can you buy me a horsie?" "Sure honey, they can't cost THAT much."
Go to Top of Page

FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  5:55:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Welcome...we look forward to hearing more about your horses...and your riding adventures.

Flooper

"Daddy, can you buy me a horsie?" "Sure honey, they can't cost THAT much."
Go to Top of Page

paintedbliss
Trainer



USA
618 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  7:27:25 PM  Show Profile Send paintedbliss a Private Message
Thanks everyone, i'm sure i'll be here often once the girls come home.I'm going to see her on saturday, its almost a 2 hour drive, transporter can't pick her up til the 4th. I thought i just try bonding with her by grooming her, gentle groundwork ect so when she comes home i won't be a total stranger to her. I feel like 12 again waiting for a christmas horse, if anything my horses will keep me young at heart.
Go to Top of Page

paintedbliss
Trainer



USA
618 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  7:27:25 PM  Show Profile Send paintedbliss a Private Message
Thanks everyone, i'm sure i'll be here often once the girls come home.I'm going to see her on saturday, its almost a 2 hour drive, transporter can't pick her up til the 4th. I thought i just try bonding with her by grooming her, gentle groundwork ect so when she comes home i won't be a total stranger to her. I feel like 12 again waiting for a christmas horse, if anything my horses will keep me young at heart.
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  8:51:25 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Welcome to the Board!

Your horses are lovely & Bliss sounds like a great mare. I know you can't wait till she gets home. Keep us posted on their progress!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 11/14/2005 :  8:51:25 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Welcome to the Board!

Your horses are lovely & Bliss sounds like a great mare. I know you can't wait till she gets home. Keep us posted on their progress!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA

"My treasures do not sparkle or glitter, they shine in the sun and neigh in the night."



~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2005 :  12:44:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Welcome....and beautiful horses and pics!
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2005 :  12:44:36 PM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Welcome....and beautiful horses and pics!
Go to Top of Page

hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2005 :  12:52:09 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message
Welcome! I've always liked the look of Paints, and yours are beautiful.
You'll find there are several of us mature beginners here to commiserate with.

Edited by - hmeyer on 11/15/2005 12:56:18 PM
Go to Top of Page

hmeyer
Clinician



USA
2194 Posts

Posted - 11/15/2005 :  12:52:09 PM  Show Profile Send hmeyer a Private Message
Welcome! I've always liked the look of Paints, and yours are beautiful.
You'll find there are several of us mature beginners here to commiserate with.

Edited by - hmeyer on 11/15/2005 12:56:18 PM
Go to Top of Page

Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  10:42:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
VERY nice looking horses, paintedbliss!! Welcome to the fourms I too have a leanto, but it's for looks. LOL If you see my signature, you will note I'm from Nebraska. Harsh winters there. Rush Creek Arabian Horse Ranch as around 100 or so horses out in the sandills in the winter. Never seen the sandhills? No trees.!! People put up L shaped wood board fences about 15-20 feet long to break the wind. That's it.

My cousin Larry was doing some research work with the people of Iceland, and their horses up in the northern highlands of Iceland fare in the winter with just hay, no grain or other shelters, other than what can be found here and there. Horses have a very good fur that holds in air next to them and repels water quite well. I've seen horses out in the pastures back home in -20 to -30 F weather and sometimes with a 20+ mile an hour wind. They stand with their back to the wind and always come through fine. There are horses here in Michigan that only have some old farm machinery to stand behind for windbreak and no barn no leanto or other. Intersingly, we have our horse out in the pasture and it also surrounds our house. During the windy cold day of Thanksgiving, she headed out to the most open part of the pasture and rarely came up by the house EVEN though it was shelter from the wind. Why?? Because horses are 1. claustrophobic by nature, they don't like barns, stalls, or even leantoo 2. Wind meakes them nervous, as they can't hear or smell danger as well and being out in the middle of the pasture with the wind was preferrable for "safety" (to the horse) rather than being close in where these was little room to run. I know it sounds funny, but horses are just like that. Now,don't get me worng about horses and barns. Horses that are desensitized and "used" to a barn will willingly go in one, same with a hooded shleter. But, the natural tendency of a horse is to stay plumb away from such things.

Feed plenty of roughage during the colder parts of winter. Don't give them too much pelletized special feed, *little goes a long way* and the roughage creates heat in them during digestion.

PS. If you can abstain from riding your young horse until it is 6 years old you will have a much better horse in the long run. (Sure that will elicit a bunch of responses!!) It's better for the horse, but most people want to get use out of the horse early on. TRAIN in the formative years, but ride at 6 years. Clinton Anderson has an excellend 4 DVD set of "Gaining Respect and Control on the Ground" and only costa about $114.00 thereabouts. *S* Good basic skills and horsemanship and "be as gentle as possibe,but as firm as necessary". Use the "approach and retreat" methods to your advantage! May the horse be with you!

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
Go to Top of Page

Frost
Beginning Rider



USA
115 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  10:42:44 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frost's Homepage Send Frost a Private Message
VERY nice looking horses, paintedbliss!! Welcome to the fourms I too have a leanto, but it's for looks. LOL If you see my signature, you will note I'm from Nebraska. Harsh winters there. Rush Creek Arabian Horse Ranch as around 100 or so horses out in the sandills in the winter. Never seen the sandhills? No trees.!! People put up L shaped wood board fences about 15-20 feet long to break the wind. That's it.

My cousin Larry was doing some research work with the people of Iceland, and their horses up in the northern highlands of Iceland fare in the winter with just hay, no grain or other shelters, other than what can be found here and there. Horses have a very good fur that holds in air next to them and repels water quite well. I've seen horses out in the pastures back home in -20 to -30 F weather and sometimes with a 20+ mile an hour wind. They stand with their back to the wind and always come through fine. There are horses here in Michigan that only have some old farm machinery to stand behind for windbreak and no barn no leanto or other. Intersingly, we have our horse out in the pasture and it also surrounds our house. During the windy cold day of Thanksgiving, she headed out to the most open part of the pasture and rarely came up by the house EVEN though it was shelter from the wind. Why?? Because horses are 1. claustrophobic by nature, they don't like barns, stalls, or even leantoo 2. Wind meakes them nervous, as they can't hear or smell danger as well and being out in the middle of the pasture with the wind was preferrable for "safety" (to the horse) rather than being close in where these was little room to run. I know it sounds funny, but horses are just like that. Now,don't get me worng about horses and barns. Horses that are desensitized and "used" to a barn will willingly go in one, same with a hooded shleter. But, the natural tendency of a horse is to stay plumb away from such things.

Feed plenty of roughage during the colder parts of winter. Don't give them too much pelletized special feed, *little goes a long way* and the roughage creates heat in them during digestion.

PS. If you can abstain from riding your young horse until it is 6 years old you will have a much better horse in the long run. (Sure that will elicit a bunch of responses!!) It's better for the horse, but most people want to get use out of the horse early on. TRAIN in the formative years, but ride at 6 years. Clinton Anderson has an excellend 4 DVD set of "Gaining Respect and Control on the Ground" and only costa about $114.00 thereabouts. *S* Good basic skills and horsemanship and "be as gentle as possibe,but as firm as necessary". Use the "approach and retreat" methods to your advantage! May the horse be with you!

Vern

Former Nebraskan...
"The quickest way to double your money is to fold it over and put it back in your pocket."

'May the HORSE be with you!' Gentle as possible, yet firm as necessary.
"I like to ride bareback, and sometimes I even wear a shirt!"
Go to Top of Page

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  10:55:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Six years is about when we started riding my mare more formally, Frost....I hope that you are right! Prior to that, she had some groundwork, saddling, and one trail ride...then the owners turned her out and used her as a brood mare. Time will tell.... :)

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  10:55:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Six years is about when we started riding my mare more formally, Frost....I hope that you are right! Prior to that, she had some groundwork, saddling, and one trail ride...then the owners turned her out and used her as a brood mare. Time will tell.... :)

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  11:13:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Hook will be six years old in the New Year. We have trained lightly the past 3 years with more emphasis this year on speed events. I am hoping to show him in games ( barrels and poles) next summer. I really think it takes seven years of pretty consistent work to have a fully trained horse that 'can read your mind" and be together with you mentally when you ride.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Go to Top of Page

Hook
Trail Boss (Moderator)



Canada
6115 Posts

Posted - 11/25/2005 :  11:13:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Hook's Homepage Send Hook a Private Message
Hook will be six years old in the New Year. We have trained lightly the past 3 years with more emphasis this year on speed events. I am hoping to show him in games ( barrels and poles) next summer. I really think it takes seven years of pretty consistent work to have a fully trained horse that 'can read your mind" and be together with you mentally when you ride.

Hook(ed)......on Horses

"The best things in life are nearest: Breath in your nostrils, light in your eyes, flowers at your feet, duties at your hand, the path of right just before you. Then do not grasp at the stars, but do life's plain, common work as it comes, certain that daily duties and daily bread are the sweetest things in life. " Author: Robert Louis Stevenson
Go to Top of Page

EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2005 :  09:03:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
Yup, the age at which one should start riding a horse is pretty controversial...I think 6 is a bit late, but would not ride a horse younger than 3.

QH's are big in this area, and are usually started around here as 2 year olds, sometimes even younger than that. Really think this is the reason why, when I was in the market for a 10-15 year old QH, I could not find one in that age range sound enough to ride!

But...unless someone is planning on doing all the training themselves, it should be kept in mind that many trainers do not want to accept older horses. They seem to prefer to have them at 2, and will take them at 3, but are reluctant to take 4-year olds, and if you have anything older than that, good luck in finding a trainer who is either hungry or dedicated enough to want to work with it! That is what I've seen in this area, anyway.

EZ2SPOT
Go to Top of Page

EZ2SPOT
Clinician

USA
3785 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2005 :  09:03:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit EZ2SPOT's Homepage Send EZ2SPOT a Private Message
Yup, the age at which one should start riding a horse is pretty controversial...I think 6 is a bit late, but would not ride a horse younger than 3.

QH's are big in this area, and are usually started around here as 2 year olds, sometimes even younger than that. Really think this is the reason why, when I was in the market for a 10-15 year old QH, I could not find one in that age range sound enough to ride!

But...unless someone is planning on doing all the training themselves, it should be kept in mind that many trainers do not want to accept older horses. They seem to prefer to have them at 2, and will take them at 3, but are reluctant to take 4-year olds, and if you have anything older than that, good luck in finding a trainer who is either hungry or dedicated enough to want to work with it! That is what I've seen in this area, anyway.

EZ2SPOT
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 11/26/2005 :  7:52:03 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Funny the subject on what age to start a horse under saddle has come up at this particular time. Donna & I rode at Salamonie State Forest, today, and just as we were getting ready to head for home after a wonderful, relaxing ride (more on this in the "Trails" forum), another trailer pulled in. Two guys got out of the truck and unloaded two nice looking colts. I asked the ages and the man told me they weren't even two but had brought them to SSF for their first trip away from home. Needless to say my eyebrows rose an inch or two at his reply. Now there is some relatively flat riding to be had at SSF, but I couldn't help but wonder what kind of riding they had in mind. Personally, I thought they were both nuts to ride a youngster that age under saddle under any circumstances.

I'm a small person, but I usually start saddle training anytime after the horse's actual 2nd birthday. So, if the horse was born on March 9, I wouldn't swing a leg over him until March 9 of his second year. I keep 2 year olds in an arena and training down to 10 to 15 minutes in any one session. By 3 years of age, I'll take them on trail ride of about an hour or a little more on fairly flat ground with no hills if possible. By 4, I'll start riding hills and go out for 2 or 3 hours. By the time they're 5, I'll usually ride them like any other horse. Of course all this depends on how mature the horse is physically and mentally to handle the work and will be subject to change to meet that individual horse's requirements.

I do feel the horse ought to be started slowly and gradually be more challenged as he matures and can handle what is being asked of him to do. Some can take it sooner and some later. It just depends on the horse. I, too, feel that 6 is a little old to wait to start training for saddle. In my honest opinion, it shouldn't hurt to start a horse at 2 or 3 if using a good dose of common sense and not rushing him too soon into something he's not ready to handle.

"God forbid that I should go to any heaven in which there are no horses"
--Robert Browning

Don't walk in front of me, I may not follow. Don't walk behind me, I may not lead. Just walk beside me and be my friend.
-- Author Unknown
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Daily Equine Forum © 2000-2002 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.23 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000