Daily Equine Forum Visit Horse Saddle Shop Read Horse Saddle Shops Blog Horse Saddle Shop Twitter Horse Saddle Shop Facebook Image Map
Daily Equine Forum
Home | Profile | Register | Active Topics |Recent Messages | Active Polls | Members | Private Messages | Search | FAQ
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Caring and Owning Horses
 Horse Training
 Help with bit selection, please
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  08:55:07 AM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
My father in-law recently gave us a 4 year old mare paint horse. About all we know is that she has been broken to ride and has a very gentle disposition.

I had a trainer come over the other night and he rode her really well with nothing but a lead rope attached to her halter like a set of reins.

Here is my question. Since she performed well without a bit, should I use a hackamore as he suggested? I have read that if a person is not an experienced horseman, which I am not, that you can mess up a horse using a hackamore. If not a hackamore, would a snaffle bit be the next logical choice?? Thanks for your help!

Edited by - LabLuvR on 08/12/2005 11:26:28 AM

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  11:52:24 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Hello & welcome to .

I have worked with bosals (I'm assuming this is what you mean by hackamore?) & side pulls. I'll have to admit that they are not my cup of tea, though I know people who love them. Like you said, I think you need to know how to use one. If you can find someone to instruct you in their use, a bosal or side pull may be just what you need... though they are usually considered training aids to prepare a horse for carrying a bit.

I, myself, prefer a snaffle for a young horse or a horse that can't take a lot of pressure in his mouth. It sounds to me like this mare might be quite content with a mild snaffle.

Here are a few things to remember when selecting a bit:

1) Make sure the width of the mouthpiece fits the horse. It shouldn't stick out the sides of his mouth like a dog holding a bone or rubbing the corners of his mouth because it's too tight. The average bit is usually 5".

2) The thicker and smoother the mouthpiece, the milder the bit. Also, a 3 piece broken mouth piece is usually milder than a 2 piece, and a solid or one piece mouth piece is usually a little harsher. There are hollow mouth bits and rubber bits for horses that can't tolerate the weight of an average bit.

3) Everything that I've said so far also applies to curb(leverage) bits. If you decide to go with a curb bit remember that the longer the shanks the more pressure can be applied and the harsher the bit. The more movable pieces a bit has(such as swivel or loose shanks), the milder the bit(This is just my opinion as we have had some disagreement on this subject ).

And lastly: Any bit is only as harsh as the hands of the person holding the reins. So, evaluate how you rein your horse when you ride, and ask yourself how much pressure you might be(even unintentionally) applying to the reins through your hands.

If it's at all possible, try to find the person who rode this horse and what they rode her with. I'd also ask how well she responds to certain cues such as leg, seat, or hands and how much and what kind of training she's had. That would be your best solution. The more knowledge you can accumulate about this mare's riding history, the better off you will be.

Good luck, and let us know if we can be of any more help .
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  11:52:24 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Hello & welcome to .

I have worked with bosals (I'm assuming this is what you mean by hackamore?) & side pulls. I'll have to admit that they are not my cup of tea, though I know people who love them. Like you said, I think you need to know how to use one. If you can find someone to instruct you in their use, a bosal or side pull may be just what you need... though they are usually considered training aids to prepare a horse for carrying a bit.

I, myself, prefer a snaffle for a young horse or a horse that can't take a lot of pressure in his mouth. It sounds to me like this mare might be quite content with a mild snaffle.

Here are a few things to remember when selecting a bit:

1) Make sure the width of the mouthpiece fits the horse. It shouldn't stick out the sides of his mouth like a dog holding a bone or rubbing the corners of his mouth because it's too tight. The average bit is usually 5".

2) The thicker and smoother the mouthpiece, the milder the bit. Also, a 3 piece broken mouth piece is usually milder than a 2 piece, and a solid or one piece mouth piece is usually a little harsher. There are hollow mouth bits and rubber bits for horses that can't tolerate the weight of an average bit.

3) Everything that I've said so far also applies to curb(leverage) bits. If you decide to go with a curb bit remember that the longer the shanks the more pressure can be applied and the harsher the bit. The more movable pieces a bit has(such as swivel or loose shanks), the milder the bit(This is just my opinion as we have had some disagreement on this subject ).

And lastly: Any bit is only as harsh as the hands of the person holding the reins. So, evaluate how you rein your horse when you ride, and ask yourself how much pressure you might be(even unintentionally) applying to the reins through your hands.

If it's at all possible, try to find the person who rode this horse and what they rode her with. I'd also ask how well she responds to certain cues such as leg, seat, or hands and how much and what kind of training she's had. That would be your best solution. The more knowledge you can accumulate about this mare's riding history, the better off you will be.

Good luck, and let us know if we can be of any more help .
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:02:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
Red Hawk,

Thanks for your response! I am working on trying to find out more about this horses history, but so far, not much luck. Not being experienced with horses, my gut feeling is that a snaffle may well be the best. The bridle my father in law gave us, has a high port curb. She did okay, but I don't know that she needed all of that.

How can a rookie such as myself tell how a horse is responding with either a like or dislike for a certain bit? Thanks again, I appreciate all of ya'lls help!
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:02:38 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
Red Hawk,

Thanks for your response! I am working on trying to find out more about this horses history, but so far, not much luck. Not being experienced with horses, my gut feeling is that a snaffle may well be the best. The bridle my father in law gave us, has a high port curb. She did okay, but I don't know that she needed all of that.

How can a rookie such as myself tell how a horse is responding with either a like or dislike for a certain bit? Thanks again, I appreciate all of ya'lls help!
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:22:19 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
If a horse is uncomfortable when you are riding, she will usually become stiff in some part of the body... normally the head & neck... whether it's the bit, bridle, saddle, etc. Unless your mare carries her head naturally a little high, the best rule of thumb is a horse will raise her head when she's uncomfortable or hurting and will lower it when she's relaxed and at ease. She'll also do this if she's confused and doesn't understand what you want her to do... or if it's something she does know how to do, but just doesn't want to do it. LOL If you feel her back raise up sharply in response to something you've done, this is usually an excellent indicator that too much pressure has been applied somewhere and/or she is hurting.

If you don't know this mare very well, I would use the softest cues possible and then strengthen them very, very, gradually until I get a response. I would also try to ride this mare from my leg, seat, and balance cues before applying any rein cues. You'd be surprised how much easier a horse will respond if leg & body cues are applied before any reining cues are used. In combination they will lighten your hands tremendously, and your mare will be much more at ease. I would ask your trainer to demonstrate this so you can better understand what I'm talking about. Some people have no idea that you can get a better response and be a better rider if you ride mostly from your legs, seat, and sense of balance more than your hands .
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:22:19 PM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
If a horse is uncomfortable when you are riding, she will usually become stiff in some part of the body... normally the head & neck... whether it's the bit, bridle, saddle, etc. Unless your mare carries her head naturally a little high, the best rule of thumb is a horse will raise her head when she's uncomfortable or hurting and will lower it when she's relaxed and at ease. She'll also do this if she's confused and doesn't understand what you want her to do... or if it's something she does know how to do, but just doesn't want to do it. LOL If you feel her back raise up sharply in response to something you've done, this is usually an excellent indicator that too much pressure has been applied somewhere and/or she is hurting.

If you don't know this mare very well, I would use the softest cues possible and then strengthen them very, very, gradually until I get a response. I would also try to ride this mare from my leg, seat, and balance cues before applying any rein cues. You'd be surprised how much easier a horse will respond if leg & body cues are applied before any reining cues are used. In combination they will lighten your hands tremendously, and your mare will be much more at ease. I would ask your trainer to demonstrate this so you can better understand what I'm talking about. Some people have no idea that you can get a better response and be a better rider if you ride mostly from your legs, seat, and sense of balance more than your hands .
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:28:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
Great suggestions! I will talk to him the next time he comes out. Thanks!
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:28:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
Great suggestions! I will talk to him the next time he comes out. Thanks!
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:33:54 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Welcome to the Board!!

I wish someone would give me a horse!

I think the secret to any bit is to release the pressure immediately when a horse makes the slightest correct response. I saw a guy riding a young horse on the trail last weekend and all I remember was the horse's gaping mouth, high headset & dancing around and the guys death grip on the reins. He had constant pressure on the horse's mouth and he wasn't letting up. Poor horse didn't know what to do.

If the bit is too harsh or the horse just doesn't like it, there will be a lot of head tossing &/or slinging. The horse may take the bit in his teeth and pull. These are also signs of the horse's teeth needing worked on.

You want to use least amount of pressure needed to get the response you want. Remember that not all cues are done via the reins & bit. In fact, it's is only a small part of what is used to control a horse. Your feet, legs & seat are all used too.

Edited to add..... Voice commands are also used... walk, trot, whoa, easy are terms I use when riding. I also use some other terms sometimes that I can't type here. ROFL!

How much experience do you have with horses?



Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~

Edited by - PaintGal on 08/12/2005 1:44:27 PM
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:33:54 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
Welcome to the Board!!

I wish someone would give me a horse!

I think the secret to any bit is to release the pressure immediately when a horse makes the slightest correct response. I saw a guy riding a young horse on the trail last weekend and all I remember was the horse's gaping mouth, high headset & dancing around and the guys death grip on the reins. He had constant pressure on the horse's mouth and he wasn't letting up. Poor horse didn't know what to do.

If the bit is too harsh or the horse just doesn't like it, there will be a lot of head tossing &/or slinging. The horse may take the bit in his teeth and pull. These are also signs of the horse's teeth needing worked on.

You want to use least amount of pressure needed to get the response you want. Remember that not all cues are done via the reins & bit. In fact, it's is only a small part of what is used to control a horse. Your feet, legs & seat are all used too.

Edited to add..... Voice commands are also used... walk, trot, whoa, easy are terms I use when riding. I also use some other terms sometimes that I can't type here. ROFL!

How much experience do you have with horses?



Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~

Edited by - PaintGal on 08/12/2005 1:44:27 PM
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:45:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
How much experience do I have? Great question. I have 3 post and you force me to reveal my age.

Let's just say that 30++ years ago I rode ponies and horses a lot. Since that time,I have been out of the loop totally. Hopefully I forgot some bad habits in the process, the process is I don't hardly remember diddly and it is quite like starting anew.
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  1:45:37 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
How much experience do I have? Great question. I have 3 post and you force me to reveal my age.

Let's just say that 30++ years ago I rode ponies and horses a lot. Since that time,I have been out of the loop totally. Hopefully I forgot some bad habits in the process, the process is I don't hardly remember diddly and it is quite like starting anew.
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  2:04:19 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by LabLuvR

How much experience do I have? Great question. I have 3 post and you force me to reveal my age.

Let's just say that 30++ years ago I rode ponies and horses a lot. Since that time,I have been out of the loop totally. Hopefully I forgot some bad habits in the process, the process is I don't hardly remember diddly and it is quite like starting anew.



Didn't you read the rules? After the 3rd post, you must reveal your age, weight, SS#, address and your banking info. LOL!!

A lot of DE members were where you are not too long ago. I always had horses around but didn't ride much for a L-O-N-G time. My focus had been on barrels & poles when I was riding/showing and now that I'm back in the saddle, my interest has switched to trail riding, although I still have a desire to circle stumps, barrels, large rocks and people if they don't move too fast.

I bet you remember more and are probably a much better rider than you think you are. Give yourself time to get to know your mare & time for your mare to get to know you. It takes time to build a relationship with your horse so be patient and go slow.

Keep us posted though! Pictures are always nice. HINT!! HINT!!!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5300 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  2:04:19 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by LabLuvR

How much experience do I have? Great question. I have 3 post and you force me to reveal my age.

Let's just say that 30++ years ago I rode ponies and horses a lot. Since that time,I have been out of the loop totally. Hopefully I forgot some bad habits in the process, the process is I don't hardly remember diddly and it is quite like starting anew.



Didn't you read the rules? After the 3rd post, you must reveal your age, weight, SS#, address and your banking info. LOL!!

A lot of DE members were where you are not too long ago. I always had horses around but didn't ride much for a L-O-N-G time. My focus had been on barrels & poles when I was riding/showing and now that I'm back in the saddle, my interest has switched to trail riding, although I still have a desire to circle stumps, barrels, large rocks and people if they don't move too fast.

I bet you remember more and are probably a much better rider than you think you are. Give yourself time to get to know your mare & time for your mare to get to know you. It takes time to build a relationship with your horse so be patient and go slow.

Keep us posted though! Pictures are always nice. HINT!! HINT!!!

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 6 y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  3:09:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
As soon as I can figure out how to download some pics I will. Thanks to all of you for your help. My focus is getting my mare where I can do some relaxing trail rides. I have no doubt we will get there. My priority is taking it slow and do it the correct way. Thanks again!
Go to Top of Page

LabLuvR
Tenderfoot

6 Posts

Posted - 08/12/2005 :  3:09:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit LabLuvR's Homepage Send LabLuvR a Private Message
As soon as I can figure out how to download some pics I will. Thanks to all of you for your help. My focus is getting my mare where I can do some relaxing trail rides. I have no doubt we will get there. My priority is taking it slow and do it the correct way. Thanks again!
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2005 :  11:57:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Welcome to the forum! You have a lot of compnay here....us oldies who rode long a go...or NOT..and revisiting childhood fascination with horses!

I wish I had known about this forum when I first returned to horses!
Go to Top of Page

fracturedbones
Clinician



3424 Posts

Posted - 08/13/2005 :  11:57:41 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Welcome to the forum! You have a lot of compnay here....us oldies who rode long a go...or NOT..and revisiting childhood fascination with horses!

I wish I had known about this forum when I first returned to horses!
Go to Top of Page

galadriel
Beginning Rider

53 Posts

Posted - 08/14/2005 :  09:29:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit galadriel's Homepage Send galadriel a Private Message
If she goes well in a halter with reins, then you might consider a sidepull. These are not severe the way a hackamore can be.

There are a lot of complications involved in selecting a bit. If the horse has a low palate or a thick tongue, a single-jointed snaffle may be uncomfortable. A thick tongue may also leave less room for a bit, meaning that a thinner bit is more comfortable. For either of these a French link or mullen mouth might be a better choice of mouthpiece--but some horses really like a single joint snaffle.

A horse with minimal training may do better with a full-cheek or D-ring bit. A horse with a busy mouth may prefer a loose ring (o-ring). An eggbutt is simple and works well for a lot of horses.

You also have a wide variety of mouthpiece matierials: stainless steel, rubber, sweet iron, copper, plastic.

And the only way to really know what a horse will like is to experiment! Unless you have a lot of friends with a lot of bits, that can get rather expensive ;) I tend to start with a hollow mouth (thick) single jointed eggbutt in stainless steel, and move on to further experimentation from there.
Go to Top of Page

galadriel
Beginning Rider

53 Posts

Posted - 08/14/2005 :  09:29:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit galadriel's Homepage Send galadriel a Private Message
If she goes well in a halter with reins, then you might consider a sidepull. These are not severe the way a hackamore can be.

There are a lot of complications involved in selecting a bit. If the horse has a low palate or a thick tongue, a single-jointed snaffle may be uncomfortable. A thick tongue may also leave less room for a bit, meaning that a thinner bit is more comfortable. For either of these a French link or mullen mouth might be a better choice of mouthpiece--but some horses really like a single joint snaffle.

A horse with minimal training may do better with a full-cheek or D-ring bit. A horse with a busy mouth may prefer a loose ring (o-ring). An eggbutt is simple and works well for a lot of horses.

You also have a wide variety of mouthpiece matierials: stainless steel, rubber, sweet iron, copper, plastic.

And the only way to really know what a horse will like is to experiment! Unless you have a lot of friends with a lot of bits, that can get rather expensive ;) I tend to start with a hollow mouth (thick) single jointed eggbutt in stainless steel, and move on to further experimentation from there.
Go to Top of Page

WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2005 :  8:11:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
hackamores are not severe unless its a mechanical hackamore.

I agree with red hawk when she say that a bit is only as hard as the riders hands.

I start my young horses in a snaffle and I wish I could keep them in it, but for showing the rules clearly state a horse must be in a bridle by the age of 5 or 6, correct me?

If you rely on voice and body aids your horse should be fine in whatever you wish to put her in. But if you dont trust your hands quite yet, keep to the mild bits.

My mare was frightned with large bits so everytime she wears a shank she is uncomfortable, any suggestions to make her not worry about the bit? I try to make it nice for her and give her all the rein she needs. But soon as the snaffle comes on she is happy. She was abused around the head and poll area, could this be triggering it?

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
Go to Top of Page

WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 08/25/2005 :  8:11:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
hackamores are not severe unless its a mechanical hackamore.

I agree with red hawk when she say that a bit is only as hard as the riders hands.

I start my young horses in a snaffle and I wish I could keep them in it, but for showing the rules clearly state a horse must be in a bridle by the age of 5 or 6, correct me?

If you rely on voice and body aids your horse should be fine in whatever you wish to put her in. But if you dont trust your hands quite yet, keep to the mild bits.

My mare was frightned with large bits so everytime she wears a shank she is uncomfortable, any suggestions to make her not worry about the bit? I try to make it nice for her and give her all the rein she needs. But soon as the snaffle comes on she is happy. She was abused around the head and poll area, could this be triggering it?

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  11:53:21 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by WhistleGrinAndRide

hackamores are not severe unless its a mechanical hackamore.

I agree with red hawk when she say that a bit is only as hard as the riders hands.

I start my young horses in a snaffle and I wish I could keep them in it, but for showing the rules clearly state a horse must be in a bridle by the age of 5 or 6, correct me?

If you rely on voice and body aids your horse should be fine in whatever you wish to put her in. But if you dont trust your hands quite yet, keep to the mild bits.

My mare was frightned with large bits so everytime she wears a shank she is uncomfortable, any suggestions to make her not worry about the bit? I try to make it nice for her and give her all the rein she needs. But soon as the snaffle comes on she is happy. She was abused around the head and poll area, could this be triggering it?

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman




By "large bits", I'm assuming you mean curb bits? A curb bit is any bit that applies leverage. This includes all "shank" bits. Forgive this lengthy explanation, WGAR, if you already know this, okay ?

When you put rein pressure on a curb bit, the shanks are drawn back and the curb chain (or strap) is raised into the horse's chin groove. At the same time (where the bridle's head stall connects to the top of the bit), pressure is being applied to the horse's poll. By this I mean that the bit pressure will tighten the crown piece of the bridle on top of the horse's head.

So, I would assume that if your mare was abused in the poll area, this could easily be the reason she gets frightened with a curb type bit. On the other hand, a snaffle applies pressure only to the horse's mouth and nothing else. There is no pressure applied to the poll or the chin groove.

I hope this helps you better understand what may be going on with your mare, and I'd say if she will ride okay with a snaffle, that I wouldn't change it. But if you are intending to show and she's too old to be shown in a snaffle or bosal according to the rules pertaining to that show, I really don't know what to tell you. Depending on how abused this mare was, she might never be comfortable in a curb bit... and if she can be corrected, it'll probably take a long, long time and tons of patience to regain her trust that she isn't being hurt with a curb bit .
Go to Top of Page

Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5092 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  11:53:21 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by WhistleGrinAndRide

hackamores are not severe unless its a mechanical hackamore.

I agree with red hawk when she say that a bit is only as hard as the riders hands.

I start my young horses in a snaffle and I wish I could keep them in it, but for showing the rules clearly state a horse must be in a bridle by the age of 5 or 6, correct me?

If you rely on voice and body aids your horse should be fine in whatever you wish to put her in. But if you dont trust your hands quite yet, keep to the mild bits.

My mare was frightned with large bits so everytime she wears a shank she is uncomfortable, any suggestions to make her not worry about the bit? I try to make it nice for her and give her all the rein she needs. But soon as the snaffle comes on she is happy. She was abused around the head and poll area, could this be triggering it?

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman




By "large bits", I'm assuming you mean curb bits? A curb bit is any bit that applies leverage. This includes all "shank" bits. Forgive this lengthy explanation, WGAR, if you already know this, okay ?

When you put rein pressure on a curb bit, the shanks are drawn back and the curb chain (or strap) is raised into the horse's chin groove. At the same time (where the bridle's head stall connects to the top of the bit), pressure is being applied to the horse's poll. By this I mean that the bit pressure will tighten the crown piece of the bridle on top of the horse's head.

So, I would assume that if your mare was abused in the poll area, this could easily be the reason she gets frightened with a curb type bit. On the other hand, a snaffle applies pressure only to the horse's mouth and nothing else. There is no pressure applied to the poll or the chin groove.

I hope this helps you better understand what may be going on with your mare, and I'd say if she will ride okay with a snaffle, that I wouldn't change it. But if you are intending to show and she's too old to be shown in a snaffle or bosal according to the rules pertaining to that show, I really don't know what to tell you. Depending on how abused this mare was, she might never be comfortable in a curb bit... and if she can be corrected, it'll probably take a long, long time and tons of patience to regain her trust that she isn't being hurt with a curb bit .
Go to Top of Page

WhistleGrinAndRide
Tenderfoot



17 Posts

Posted - 08/26/2005 :  3:43:03 PM  Show Profile  Visit WhistleGrinAndRide's Homepage Send WhistleGrinAndRide a Private Message
sorry yes I meant curb hehe

Thanks so much for the great response. She has really come a long way. She is now 8 years old and i have owned her from 5. She used to be scared of her head being touched now she just loves to be hugged and have her eyes pat.

Thanks, that must be the problem with the curb, around the poll area. I know I will take alot of patience. Thats ok, well stick to small shows where to rules are bendable hehe! Ill just comtinue hopefully to regain it.

What I forgot to mention, all horses when they reach a certain stage or training are ready for a bridle. Such as a curb. Snaffles are for young horses, so she will eventually need to be put in a bridle. I dont know if its the same over there but I know here, if someone sees your horse in a snaffle and hes overage they assume he isnt broke!

Thanks again.
WhistleGrinAndRide

Control the life in the body, so then the mind gets it, when the mind understands, then the feet understand."

Ray Hunt, master horseman
Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 New Topic  Topic Locked
 Printer Friendly
Jump To:
Daily Equine Forum © 2000-2002 Snitz Communications Go To Top Of Page
This page was generated in 0.23 seconds. Snitz Forums 2000