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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  05:20:22 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Hi Everyone-
I have a question for all you experienced horse people out there. My daughters new horse is very gentle friendly mare but is still such an outsider. Unfortuanatly my horse is a big &%*#*! I thought by now they'd be settled and getting along fine but my horse is still so mean to her--she bites or kicks at her any chance she gets and most of the time for no reason at all. She will trap the new horse in her own stall and bite her and eat her grain. When I'm in there I will shoo my horse out of the barn but I'm sure once I'm gone she does it again. I don't have time in the am to stall them to feed I do feed them in their individual stalls but like I said my horse will go into the horses stall and steal her grain. My husband thinks my horse has an attitude problem and I'm starting to think so too. I feel bad for the new horse she'll be standing on one side of the barn in the pasture all by herself and my mare and the naughty pony(yes I still have him) will be on the otherside of the barn in the pasture.
Is this something that will eventually work itself out--I don't have room to pasture them seperate either. I am worried that I may have to get rid of one of them if they can't get along--and I'm afraid it'll be my horse!!
Any suggestions will be appreciated

Dorthy Brown

Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:07:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Give it a bit more time, Dodi..... If there is any time (week-ends?) that you CAN separate them while feeding, it would help. Or can you feed them outside? Divide the rations up into enough feeders, plus one. (Three horses, four feeders/buckets, three horses, four piles of hay) That way, when the one gets chased off, he/she can circle around and eat out of another feeder....spread feeders away from each other so that there is not room for two horses to kick at each other while they eat.

At least your daughter's horse is getting some "alone" time....being in a diff. spot of the pasture. At least the others aren't chasing her non-stop! This situation sounds like it just needs more time, and the boss mare who steals the grain/feed isn't doing anything that any other boss horse wouldn't do.

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"

~~~~~~


Edited by - Saddletramp on 03/02/2005 06:08:38 AM
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Saddletramp
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2546 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:07:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit Saddletramp's Homepage Send Saddletramp a Private Message
Give it a bit more time, Dodi..... If there is any time (week-ends?) that you CAN separate them while feeding, it would help. Or can you feed them outside? Divide the rations up into enough feeders, plus one. (Three horses, four feeders/buckets, three horses, four piles of hay) That way, when the one gets chased off, he/she can circle around and eat out of another feeder....spread feeders away from each other so that there is not room for two horses to kick at each other while they eat.

At least your daughter's horse is getting some "alone" time....being in a diff. spot of the pasture. At least the others aren't chasing her non-stop! This situation sounds like it just needs more time, and the boss mare who steals the grain/feed isn't doing anything that any other boss horse wouldn't do.

-Saddletramp

"She never moved the stars from their courses,
but she loved a good man and she rode good horses"

~~~~~~


Edited by - Saddletramp on 03/02/2005 06:08:38 AM
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:15:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Ok I will give it more time, thats a relief cause I don't want to get rid of my horse. I do feed the hay outside and actually seperate into many piles and spread all over the pasture for that reason, so the new horse can eat--even though she is constantly chased away from the pile she's eating from. I have also tried feeding my horse grain inside the barn and the other horse outside--but my horse gobbles hers down then runs out and eats the other mares grain. When spring gets here I probably won't be feeding grain---or very little so it shouldn't be such an issue. I just wish they'd get along!!!!!!!!!!! ANd also wonder if we had brought home a gelding if we would be having the same issue?? Also it seems so strange to me that my mare was actually low in the herd at her old home and now is so.........bossy!!! The new mare is actually older than my mare so I thought she may take the position of the boss mare but so far no---she does kick back occasionally though.

Dorthy Brown
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:15:14 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Ok I will give it more time, thats a relief cause I don't want to get rid of my horse. I do feed the hay outside and actually seperate into many piles and spread all over the pasture for that reason, so the new horse can eat--even though she is constantly chased away from the pile she's eating from. I have also tried feeding my horse grain inside the barn and the other horse outside--but my horse gobbles hers down then runs out and eats the other mares grain. When spring gets here I probably won't be feeding grain---or very little so it shouldn't be such an issue. I just wish they'd get along!!!!!!!!!!! ANd also wonder if we had brought home a gelding if we would be having the same issue?? Also it seems so strange to me that my mare was actually low in the herd at her old home and now is so.........bossy!!! The new mare is actually older than my mare so I thought she may take the position of the boss mare but so far no---she does kick back occasionally though.

Dorthy Brown
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:28:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Dodib,

Had a similar problem. I wrote about it on the forum about 2 months ago...Toby was being a real you-know-what, and was beating up on Vern and Teddie a lot--lots of NASTY bite and kick marks, etc. I didn't know what to do, and it was really getting bad.

BUT...things have now calmed down. Toby has not bitten or kicked any of the other horses for a long time now. They are all getting along much better. Toby is still boss horse, and still will put his ears back and chase the others out of the barn or away from the hay if he feels like it, but at least there is no physical attacks anymore. What a relief!!! Haven't found any new bite or kick marks on Vern or Teddie for a long time now.

So I'd give it some more time...that's what it took with my gang.

Flooper

"Daddy, can you buy me a horsie?" "Sure honey, they can't cost THAT much."
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FLOOPER
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
2493 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  06:28:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit FLOOPER's Homepage Send FLOOPER a Private Message
Dodib,

Had a similar problem. I wrote about it on the forum about 2 months ago...Toby was being a real you-know-what, and was beating up on Vern and Teddie a lot--lots of NASTY bite and kick marks, etc. I didn't know what to do, and it was really getting bad.

BUT...things have now calmed down. Toby has not bitten or kicked any of the other horses for a long time now. They are all getting along much better. Toby is still boss horse, and still will put his ears back and chase the others out of the barn or away from the hay if he feels like it, but at least there is no physical attacks anymore. What a relief!!! Haven't found any new bite or kick marks on Vern or Teddie for a long time now.

So I'd give it some more time...that's what it took with my gang.

Flooper

"Daddy, can you buy me a horsie?" "Sure honey, they can't cost THAT much."
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5035 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  07:08:13 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by dodib

Ok I will give it more time, thats a relief cause I don't want to get rid of my horse. I do feed the hay outside and actually seperate into many piles and spread all over the pasture for that reason, so the new horse can eat--even though she is constantly chased away from the pile she's eating from. I have also tried feeding my horse grain inside the barn and the other horse outside--but my horse gobbles hers down then runs out and eats the other mares grain. When spring gets here I probably won't be feeding grain---or very little so it shouldn't be such an issue. I just wish they'd get along!!!!!!!!!!! ANd also wonder if we had brought home a gelding if we would be having the same issue?? Also it seems so strange to me that my mare was actually low in the herd at her old home and now is so.........bossy!!! The new mare is actually older than my mare so I thought she may take the position of the boss mare but so far no---she does kick back occasionally though.

Dorthy Brown



Sometimes a horse that was low in the pecking order will boss other horses around after being introduced to a totally different bunch of horses. But believe it or not, it's usually a huge bluff.

My mare Wimpy had been alone for awhile at one place I boarded her. So, when I brought Warrior home as a yearling, she immediately took him under her wing. You would've thought she'd given birth to him the way she treated him. Then years later, I had both of them at another place, and we had 5 horses there at the time. W.T. was one of them, and he was just a 2 year old then. Wimpy was in her early 20's but was still the alpha horse, and Warrior was 7 or 8 at the time.

Anyway, Wimpy would still protect Warrior from the other horses, which in turn made Warrior very brave. Warrior was just about 15 hands tall where W.T. stood 15.3, and yet Warrior had W.T. convinced that he could chew W.T. up and spit him out with one hoof tied behind his back. Naturally, this just made Warrior act nastier toward W.T.

Then we bought our own property and brought Warrior & W.T. home. This was after Wimpy had gone to her reward. Enter Dove. Warrior immediately tried to run the bluff on Dove that he was in charge. WRONG! Warrior's bluff had been called and Wimpy was no longer there to protect him. I never saw a more shocked horse in my life when Warrior discovered he was in BIG trouble. Dove put him in his place right now, and that was the end of it. You see, Warrior was a devout coward. He only SEEMED tough when in reality he was a puppy dog. The game was over, and he'd lost!

This might be the same game your TB mare is pulling. Also, it took most of the summer before Dove quit picking on Terra her yearling year. She had bite & kick marks on her for most of that 1st summer she was with us. By the following summer, the bite marks were less, and now Dove & her are the best of buds. Except at meal time. That's why I feed them in stalls with the doors securely latched. Steve feeds them early in the morning before he goes to work. Since I work 2nd shift, I can turn them out after I get up... usually around 9:00 am. I know this doesn't help your situation, but Warrior's story might explain your horses'(that plural ) behavior.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5035 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  07:08:13 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by dodib

Ok I will give it more time, thats a relief cause I don't want to get rid of my horse. I do feed the hay outside and actually seperate into many piles and spread all over the pasture for that reason, so the new horse can eat--even though she is constantly chased away from the pile she's eating from. I have also tried feeding my horse grain inside the barn and the other horse outside--but my horse gobbles hers down then runs out and eats the other mares grain. When spring gets here I probably won't be feeding grain---or very little so it shouldn't be such an issue. I just wish they'd get along!!!!!!!!!!! ANd also wonder if we had brought home a gelding if we would be having the same issue?? Also it seems so strange to me that my mare was actually low in the herd at her old home and now is so.........bossy!!! The new mare is actually older than my mare so I thought she may take the position of the boss mare but so far no---she does kick back occasionally though.

Dorthy Brown



Sometimes a horse that was low in the pecking order will boss other horses around after being introduced to a totally different bunch of horses. But believe it or not, it's usually a huge bluff.

My mare Wimpy had been alone for awhile at one place I boarded her. So, when I brought Warrior home as a yearling, she immediately took him under her wing. You would've thought she'd given birth to him the way she treated him. Then years later, I had both of them at another place, and we had 5 horses there at the time. W.T. was one of them, and he was just a 2 year old then. Wimpy was in her early 20's but was still the alpha horse, and Warrior was 7 or 8 at the time.

Anyway, Wimpy would still protect Warrior from the other horses, which in turn made Warrior very brave. Warrior was just about 15 hands tall where W.T. stood 15.3, and yet Warrior had W.T. convinced that he could chew W.T. up and spit him out with one hoof tied behind his back. Naturally, this just made Warrior act nastier toward W.T.

Then we bought our own property and brought Warrior & W.T. home. This was after Wimpy had gone to her reward. Enter Dove. Warrior immediately tried to run the bluff on Dove that he was in charge. WRONG! Warrior's bluff had been called and Wimpy was no longer there to protect him. I never saw a more shocked horse in my life when Warrior discovered he was in BIG trouble. Dove put him in his place right now, and that was the end of it. You see, Warrior was a devout coward. He only SEEMED tough when in reality he was a puppy dog. The game was over, and he'd lost!

This might be the same game your TB mare is pulling. Also, it took most of the summer before Dove quit picking on Terra her yearling year. She had bite & kick marks on her for most of that 1st summer she was with us. By the following summer, the bite marks were less, and now Dove & her are the best of buds. Except at meal time. That's why I feed them in stalls with the doors securely latched. Steve feeds them early in the morning before he goes to work. Since I work 2nd shift, I can turn them out after I get up... usually around 9:00 am. I know this doesn't help your situation, but Warrior's story might explain your horses'(that plural ) behavior.
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Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  07:44:05 AM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
Some horses are just plain pissants. My husbands mare Rosie was hand raised here and absolutely runs that pasture with an iron hoof. She must be first in the barn, she must be first in the trailer, she must be first thru the gate, she must lead the group on all trail rides. BG has worked with her a lot and she knows not to be aggressive on the trail to strangers, but I have seen her get angry another horse, waited until they got in the pasture and immediately gave her two kicks.
Strange thing is, when my gelding Max was orphaned at three months, Auntie Rose took over, sheltered him, let him eat her grain( this had NEVER happened before) and gave him companionship. Allows him to come in the barn first, but my mare had never better try it. Go figure.
We just make sure there is enough space for all, and my mare has learned to stay away from Rose. Max gives her companionship so she can feel part of the herd, but her and Rose do not play or bond.

Jill

Life is to short to ride bad horses.
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Parrothead
Trainer



USA
559 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  07:44:05 AM  Show Profile Send Parrothead a Private Message
Some horses are just plain pissants. My husbands mare Rosie was hand raised here and absolutely runs that pasture with an iron hoof. She must be first in the barn, she must be first in the trailer, she must be first thru the gate, she must lead the group on all trail rides. BG has worked with her a lot and she knows not to be aggressive on the trail to strangers, but I have seen her get angry another horse, waited until they got in the pasture and immediately gave her two kicks.
Strange thing is, when my gelding Max was orphaned at three months, Auntie Rose took over, sheltered him, let him eat her grain( this had NEVER happened before) and gave him companionship. Allows him to come in the barn first, but my mare had never better try it. Go figure.
We just make sure there is enough space for all, and my mare has learned to stay away from Rose. Max gives her companionship so she can feel part of the herd, but her and Rose do not play or bond.

Jill

Life is to short to ride bad horses.
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3394 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  10:09:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Dorothy, you've gotten some good advice here. Things will work out in time I think also. Much as the pony runs the TB around and kicks, will try to bite, they now do play stuff like that too, and he hollars in agony if the TB is lead away! He actually is the bigger baby though tries to act like boss man!

People get more offended with this type of behavior than horses I think... behavior like this is part of their world...but politically "incorrect" in human type behavior.
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3394 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  10:09:04 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Dorothy, you've gotten some good advice here. Things will work out in time I think also. Much as the pony runs the TB around and kicks, will try to bite, they now do play stuff like that too, and he hollars in agony if the TB is lead away! He actually is the bigger baby though tries to act like boss man!

People get more offended with this type of behavior than horses I think... behavior like this is part of their world...but politically "incorrect" in human type behavior.
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TexasJody
Advanced Rider



USA
369 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  4:03:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit TexasJody's Homepage Send TexasJody a Private Message
This is sort of 'normal' horse behavior. I take it the older horse was brought in last? Usually the first horse there will claim the territory...the second horse is the 'intruder'. Your older horse does not want a physical battle, or she would have provided one by this time and with this amount of provocation. Do your stalls not have doors? Can you get one of those stall guards to stretch across the door so your horse can't disturb her while she's eating?

If not I would suggest that you take charge at mealtimes...get your lunging whip and discourage your horse from this behavior. Drive her out and don't let her come back. She will learn that you WANT the other horse there, they're BOTH your horses.Your horse must learn to understand that she 'shares' the place, the barn, the feed, and YOU.

It's been a bit of a problem with our new horses settling in here, as well. My husband wanted to interfere, and I might have, but the one being picked on was holding her own quite well...and now the attacks have desisted. They get along well now, but I would not have allowed Star to be cannibalized without interfering.

Good luck,
TJ

Horse, thou art truly a creature without equal, for thou fliest without wings and conquerest without a sword.
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TexasJody
Advanced Rider



USA
369 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  4:03:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit TexasJody's Homepage Send TexasJody a Private Message
This is sort of 'normal' horse behavior. I take it the older horse was brought in last? Usually the first horse there will claim the territory...the second horse is the 'intruder'. Your older horse does not want a physical battle, or she would have provided one by this time and with this amount of provocation. Do your stalls not have doors? Can you get one of those stall guards to stretch across the door so your horse can't disturb her while she's eating?

If not I would suggest that you take charge at mealtimes...get your lunging whip and discourage your horse from this behavior. Drive her out and don't let her come back. She will learn that you WANT the other horse there, they're BOTH your horses.Your horse must learn to understand that she 'shares' the place, the barn, the feed, and YOU.

It's been a bit of a problem with our new horses settling in here, as well. My husband wanted to interfere, and I might have, but the one being picked on was holding her own quite well...and now the attacks have desisted. They get along well now, but I would not have allowed Star to be cannibalized without interfering.

Good luck,
TJ

Horse, thou art truly a creature without equal, for thou fliest without wings and conquerest without a sword.
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5097 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  5:13:25 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by dodib

She will trap the new horse in her own stall and bite her and eat her grain. When I'm in there I will shoo my horse out of the barn but I'm sure once I'm gone she does it again.



Can you feed grain at night while you're there and leave the stalls closed during the day? Having a set up that allows one horse to "trap" another is dangerous to both horses. One or both horses could be hurt while one is trying to get through the stall door with the other in the way. If you have to feed grain in the morning, just dump it on the hay making sure to separate the piles of hay so you mare can't hog all of it. If I feed grain, I only feed it at night.

I bet once the pony is gone, your mare will decide the new horse isn't such a bad sort and will buddy up with her.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 5y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~
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PaintGal
Trail Boss (Moderator)



USA
5097 Posts

Posted - 03/02/2005 :  5:13:25 PM  Show Profile Send PaintGal a Private Message
quote:
Originally posted by dodib

She will trap the new horse in her own stall and bite her and eat her grain. When I'm in there I will shoo my horse out of the barn but I'm sure once I'm gone she does it again.



Can you feed grain at night while you're there and leave the stalls closed during the day? Having a set up that allows one horse to "trap" another is dangerous to both horses. One or both horses could be hurt while one is trying to get through the stall door with the other in the way. If you have to feed grain in the morning, just dump it on the hay making sure to separate the piles of hay so you mare can't hog all of it. If I feed grain, I only feed it at night.

I bet once the pony is gone, your mare will decide the new horse isn't such a bad sort and will buddy up with her.

Karen ~ Trails
&
Joe 5y/o Paint
Paoli, IN USA


~~~~~~
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  05:45:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Thank you all for the advice.
The new horse has been also getting her licks in --but is more passive than the other horse. Their ages aren't much different, my mare will be 7 and the new mare will be 10.
Our stalls are very makeshift right now--if winter ever ends we will be doing the barn floor and making some "real" stalls. But I do not have time in the morning to lock them in the stalls---I feed then leave for work.
I have started feeding the new mare her grain outside so at least she can't get trapped in the stall--if my mare decides to take the other mares grain she just gets chased away--so its safer anyway
My mare seems to act meaner to her when I'm there. When I observe from a distance they seem to get along ok. Eat hay next to each other I've even seen them grooming each other. My mare acts extremely jealous--she seems to hate for me to pay any attention to the new mare. Very weird............

Dorthy Brown
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  05:45:20 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Thank you all for the advice.
The new horse has been also getting her licks in --but is more passive than the other horse. Their ages aren't much different, my mare will be 7 and the new mare will be 10.
Our stalls are very makeshift right now--if winter ever ends we will be doing the barn floor and making some "real" stalls. But I do not have time in the morning to lock them in the stalls---I feed then leave for work.
I have started feeding the new mare her grain outside so at least she can't get trapped in the stall--if my mare decides to take the other mares grain she just gets chased away--so its safer anyway
My mare seems to act meaner to her when I'm there. When I observe from a distance they seem to get along ok. Eat hay next to each other I've even seen them grooming each other. My mare acts extremely jealous--she seems to hate for me to pay any attention to the new mare. Very weird............

Dorthy Brown
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TexasJody
Advanced Rider



USA
369 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:30:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit TexasJody's Homepage Send TexasJody a Private Message
No, not weird. Very common for a horse to be jealous of its owner. I had two horses that I enjoyed riding equally, but...they were for two different uses. When I rode one of them, the other would be annoyed...would behave aggressively to the returning horse.This just lasted a few minutes, long enough to register 'displeasure'.

A friend in La. trained horses for other people. His own horse was very jealous. One day he'd been working with a clients horse..leading it back into the barn. He walked near the stall of his horse...the horse reached over the door and bit Don...got him in the jugular and almost killed him. A jealous horse is not something to take lightly.

TJ

Horse, thou art truly a creature without equal, for thou fliest without wings and conquerest without a sword.
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TexasJody
Advanced Rider



USA
369 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:30:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit TexasJody's Homepage Send TexasJody a Private Message
No, not weird. Very common for a horse to be jealous of its owner. I had two horses that I enjoyed riding equally, but...they were for two different uses. When I rode one of them, the other would be annoyed...would behave aggressively to the returning horse.This just lasted a few minutes, long enough to register 'displeasure'.

A friend in La. trained horses for other people. His own horse was very jealous. One day he'd been working with a clients horse..leading it back into the barn. He walked near the stall of his horse...the horse reached over the door and bit Don...got him in the jugular and almost killed him. A jealous horse is not something to take lightly.

TJ

Horse, thou art truly a creature without equal, for thou fliest without wings and conquerest without a sword.
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:52:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Is there something I should be doing about her jealousy?? SHe has never acted aggressive at all towards people but she sure gets at the other horses if they come by me

Dorthy Brown
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dodib
Trainer

USA
783 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:52:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit dodib's Homepage Send dodib a Private Message
Is there something I should be doing about her jealousy?? SHe has never acted aggressive at all towards people but she sure gets at the other horses if they come by me

Dorthy Brown
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5035 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:55:29 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Dorthy; Would it be possible for you to go out first thing in the morning, bring your horses into their stalls, and feed them just their grain... then while they are in their stalls, put the hay outside for them and go back into the house to prepare for your work day? Then right before you leave (they should be done eating their grain by then), turn your horses out for their hay and leave for work? Steve & I did this when we were both working 1st shift, and it worked quite well.

I've had horses, many times, be jealous when I start working more with another horse. That was the main reason Warrior hated W.T. so much. Warrior just didn't have enough fire under the roof to challenge my riding skills. He was too lazy for my tastes. He hated W.T. when W.T. received more of my time and attention. The situation did improve over the years... but it never diminished entirely.

I liked Warrior, but we just never clicked. I kept him because anyone could ride him. He was the perfect horse if someone visiting wanted to ride with me. He was also a fantastic beginner's horse, and was my lesson horse for giving riding lessons for many years before he went to his reward.
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Red Hawk
Clinician



USA
5035 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  06:55:29 AM  Show Profile Send Red Hawk a Private Message
Dorthy; Would it be possible for you to go out first thing in the morning, bring your horses into their stalls, and feed them just their grain... then while they are in their stalls, put the hay outside for them and go back into the house to prepare for your work day? Then right before you leave (they should be done eating their grain by then), turn your horses out for their hay and leave for work? Steve & I did this when we were both working 1st shift, and it worked quite well.

I've had horses, many times, be jealous when I start working more with another horse. That was the main reason Warrior hated W.T. so much. Warrior just didn't have enough fire under the roof to challenge my riding skills. He was too lazy for my tastes. He hated W.T. when W.T. received more of my time and attention. The situation did improve over the years... but it never diminished entirely.

I liked Warrior, but we just never clicked. I kept him because anyone could ride him. He was the perfect horse if someone visiting wanted to ride with me. He was also a fantastic beginner's horse, and was my lesson horse for giving riding lessons for many years before he went to his reward.
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fracturedbones
Clinician



3394 Posts

Posted - 03/03/2005 :  09:48:48 AM  Show Profile  Visit fracturedbones's Homepage Send fracturedbones a Private Message
Dodi, re: your own safety: just be careful about getting in between them...one horse may be going for the other and you get trampled in the middle...

would let the horses sort it out. Grain is definetly one of those "it's ALL mine" things...

RH, was Dom the owner or the other horse? THAT is scary!!
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